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Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

D

Agendas

Regional Disaster Response Coordination
to Support Health Outcomes:
A Workshop Series

March 26, 2014
Huntington Room
The Beckman Center
Irvine, CA

8:30 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks, Challenges to Ensuring Health in Regional Disaster Preparedness: Community Planning and Engagement, Information Management and Coordination, and Surge Management

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair
Senior Partner
Martin, Blanck & Associates

Session I: Community Planning and Engagement

8:50 a.m.

Panel Presentation: Community Planning Across a Region: Previous Work, Examples of Success and Continuing Needs to Address Regional Disasters Versus Local Disasters

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Cross-Sector Collaboration:
ANA-MARIE JONES
Executive Director
Collaborating Agencies Responding to Disasters (CARD)

 

At-Risk Populations:
TERESA EHNERT
Bureau Chief, Public Health Emergency Preparedness
Arizona Department of Health Services

 

Engagement of Volunteers in Emergencies:
CAPT. ROBERT TOSATTO
Director
Division of Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps

 

Social Capital and Cohesion:
DANIEL ALDRICH
Associate Professor of Political Science
Purdue University

9:50 a.m.

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

10:20 a.m.

BREAK

Session II: Breakout Discussions

10:40 a.m.

Breakout Discussion by Focus Area

Cross-Sector Collaboration:

Having multiple businesses, government authorities, nonprofit governmental organizations (NGOs), and faith-based groups in a community can greatly augment disaster response, but challenges remain in building integrated, coordinated responses across a community, especially when standard memo-randa of understanding (MOUs) might not be sufficient, including (1) supply chain interruptions affecting multiple jurisdictions/communities; (2) conveying the need for preparedness by all to engage diverse, cross-sector involvement; and

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

(3) promoting health security collaborations within and across communities so authorities can “operationalize” a next level of response at the regional level.

 

Facilitators

 

ANA-MARIE JONES

Executive Director

Collaborating Agencies Responding to Disasters (CARD)

 

LYNNE KIDDER, Preparedness Forum Co-Chair
Former President & CEO
The Bipartisan WMD Terrorism Research Center

At-Risk Populations:

Engaging vulnerable and at-risk populations is often a challenge in cities nationwide, but coordinating this engagement across jurisdictions becomes even more difficult: (1) knowledge of medically vulnerable, electricity-dependent citizens is limited and haphazard, and sharing this knowledge is not always possible; (2) citizens receiving social services are often vulnerable in disasters but not included in pre-planning efforts (i.e., child care facilities, foster care programs, homeless youth, refugee populations, low-income families, and seniors) and might not be aware of their need to coordinate across a region; and (3) integrating community health clinic expansion with social service outreach is difficult across community borders/ jurisdictional lines.

 

Facilitators

 

TERESA EHNERT

Bureau Chief, Public Health Emergency Preparedness, Arizona Department of Health Services

 

SUZET MCKINNEY, Planning Committee

Deputy Commissioner, Chicago Department of Public Health

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Management of Volunteers During Emergencies:

Volunteer networks are essential in disasters and multiple volunteer organizations have built strong response frameworks. However, coordination of these organizations often remains a challenge, especially during responses that span multiple jurisdictions. Some key volunteer management issues include (1) promising practices in the management of volunteers across a region, including credentialing, background checks, initial and ongoing training, and core competencies; (2) coordination for the deployment of volunteers across organizations (e.g., MRC, American Red Cross, VOAD, etc.) and jurisdictions; (3) liability or other risks and barriers that could create difficulties for the use of volunteers for certain missions or regional deployments; and (4) management of spontaneous volunteers during a regional response.

 

Facilitators

 

CAPT. ROBERT TOSATTO

Director, Division of Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps

 

JOHN HICK, Planning Committee

Medical Director, Office of Emergency Preparedness, Minnesota Department of Health

Social Capital and Cohesion:

More research and evidence has been emerging to support the need for stronger social cohesion in communities to increase resilience to disasters, but existing challenges are (1) latent social conflicts existing in a region that can hinder network building; (2) difficulty in engaging individual citizens in preparedness activities and the importance of having “citizen responders”; and (3) unique considerations of connecting social capital networks across multiple communities if a disaster occurs affecting an entire region.

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Facilitators

 

DANIEL ALDRICH
Associate Professor of Political Science
Purdue University

 

KENNETH SCHOR, Preparedness Forum member
Acting Director
National Center for Disaster Medicine & Public Health

12:15 p.m.

LUNCH

Session III: Breakouts Continued

1:15 p.m.

Breakout Discussion by Focus Area

Cross-Sector Collaboration:

Having multiple businesses, government authorities, and NGOs and faith-based groups in a community can greatly augment disaster response, but challenges remain in building integrated, coordinated responses across a community, especially when standard MOUs might not be sufficient, including (1) supply chain interruptions affecting multiple jurisdictions/ communities; (2) conveying the need for preparedness by all to engage diverse, cross-sector involvement; and (3) promoting health security collaborations within and across communities so authorities can “operationalize” a next level of response at the regional level.

 

Facilitators

 

ANA-MARIE JONES

Executive Director

Collaborating Agencies Responding to Disasters (CARD)

 

LYNNE KIDDER, Preparedness Forum Co-Chair

Former President and CEO

The Bipartisan WMD Terrorism Research Center

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

At-Risk Populations:

Engaging vulnerable and at-risk populations is often a challenge in cities nationwide, but coordinating this engagement across jurisdictions becomes even more difficult (1) knowledge of medically vulnerable, electricity-dependent citizens is limited and haphazard, and sharing this knowledge is not always possible; (2) citizens receiving social services are often vulnerable in disasters but not included in pre-planning efforts (e.g., child care facilities, foster care programs, homeless youth, refugee populations, low-income families and seniors) and might not be aware of their need to coordinate across a region; and (3) integrating community health clinic expansion with social service outreach is difficult across community borders/jurisdictional lines.

 

Facilitators

 

TERESA EHNERT

Bureau Chief, Public Health Emergency Preparedness, Arizona Department of Health Services

 

SUZET MCKINNEY, Planning Committee

Deputy Commissioner, Chicago Department of Public Health

Management of Volunteers During Emergencies:

Volunteer networks are essential in disasters and multiple volunteer organizations have built strong response frameworks. However, coordination of these organizations often remains a challenge, especially during responses that span multiple jurisdictions. Some key volunteer management issues include (1) promising practices in the management of volunteers across a region, including credentialing, background checks, initial and ongoing training, and core competencies; (2) coordination for the deployment of volunteers across organizations (e.g., MRC, American Red Cross, VOAD, etc.) and jurisdictions; (3) liability or other risks and barriers that could create difficulties for the use of volunteers for certain missions or regional deployments; and (4) management of spontaneous volunteers during a regional response.

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Facilitators

 

CAPT. ROBERT TOSATTO

Director, Division of Civilian Volunteer Medical Reserve Corps

 

JOHN HICK, Planning Committee

Medical Director, Office of Emergency Preparedness, Minnesota Department of Health

Social Capital and Cohesion:

More research and evidence has been emerging to support the need for stronger social cohesion in communities to increase resilience to disasters, but existing challenges are (1) latent social conflicts existing in a region that can hinder network building; (2) difficulty in engaging individual citizens in preparedness activities and the importance of having “citizen responders”; and (3) unique considerations of connecting social capital networks across multiple communities if a disaster occurs affecting an entire region.

 

Facilitators

 

DANIEL ALDRICH

Associate Professor of Political Science
Purdue University

 

KENNETH SCHOR, Preparedness Forum member

Acting Director

National Center for Disaster Medicine & Public Health

2:30 p.m.

Group Rotation: Opportunity to give feedback to another topic area

  1. (1) What is missing?
  2. (2) Added perspective from your organization/discipline
Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Rotations:

Board Room → Huntington Room
Huntington Room → Board Room
Newport Room → Balboa Room
Balboa Room → Newport Room

3:00 p.m.

BREAK

Session IV: Wrap Up

3:30 p.m.

Final Plenary and Report-Out by Facilitators Huntington Room

 

  • Cross-Sector Collaboration
  • At-Risk Populations
  • Management of Volunteers
  • Social Capital and Cohesion

4:30 p.m.

Wrap-Up Discussion and Next Steps

 

  • What central themes emerged across topics?
    • Top identified challenges?
    • Top identified opportunities?

 

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair

Senior Partner

Martin, Blanck & Associates

5:00 p.m.

ADJOURN

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Regional Disaster Response Coordination
to Support Health Outcomes:
A Workshop Series

July 24, 2014
Malcolm Moos Health Sciences Tower
University of Minnesota
515 Delaware Street, SE
Minneapolis, MN

8:30 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks, Challenges to Ensuring Health in Regional Disaster Preparedness: Community Planning and Engagement, Information Management and Coordination, and Surge Management

 

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair

Senior Partner

Martin, Blanck & Associates

8:40 a.m.

Overview: Information and Incident Management

 

GARY SCHENKEL

Executive Director

Chicago Office of Emergency Management and Communication

Session I: Case Study Scenarios

Session Objectives:

  • Explore pieces of information management during disasters through various recent case studies
    • Identify gaps that still exist for specific disasters (i.e., slow moving, no-notice, natural disaster, etc.)

9:00 a.m.

Panel Presentation: Information Sharing and Coordination Lessons Learned from Past Experiences and Continuing Needs to Address Regional Disasters Versus Local Disasters

 

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Hurricane Sandy:

KELLIE BENTZ

Team Lead, Global Crisis Management
Target Corporation

 

Hurricane Evacuation Response (Katrina, Rita, Ike, Gustav):

MICHAEL MCCLENDON

Director

Office of Public Health Preparedness Emergency
Management Coordinator
Harris County Public Health and Environmental
Health Services

9:45 a.m.

Discussion with Attendees

10:00 a.m.

BREAK

10:15 a.m.

(Panel Continued)

 

West Virginia Chemical Spill:
RAHUL GUPTA

Executive Director/Health Officer

Kanawha-Charleston Health Department

 

2009 H1N1 Outbreak (MN):
AARON DEVRIES

Epidemiologist and Medical Director
Infectious Disease Division
Minnesota Department of Health

 

Boston Marathon Bombings:
RICHARD SERINO, Preparedness Forum Member
Former Deputy Administrator and
Chief Operating Officer
Federal Emergency Management Agency

11:15 a.m.

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

11:45 a.m.

LUNCH

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Session II: Breakout Discussions

12:45 p.m.

Breakout Discussions by Focus Area—Within focus areas discuss and identify 2 to 3 top constraints and opportunities related to each topic area. Discuss potential partnerships to help address challenges.

Information Sharing and Dissemination to Stakeholders:

 

  • Potential for integration of health PIOs into Joint Information Centers
  • How does information get to the PIO in each jurisdiction? How is information pushed to stakeholders such as NGOs, FBOs, and health care coalitions assisting in response efforts?
  • Private-sector communication spanning jurisdictions (i.e., multiple Targets throughout a region, COCA guidance from CDC)

 

Facilitators

 

RAHUL GUPTA
Executive Director/Health Officer
Kanawha-Charleston Health Department

JOHN HICK, Preparedness Forum Member
Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness
Hennepin County Medical Center

Using Data to Augment Situational Awareness and Incident Management:

 

  • How can surveillance and information be mined for intelligence to assist in response? How can libraries and information specialists assist in this effort?
  • Can informatics support clinical management and “community triage” to lessen surge demands on area hospitals?
Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×
  • How can non-traditional partners (e.g., sentinel laboratories, librarians, Information Sharing Advisory Councils, and others) be included in data collection and information coordination with public health and emergency management officials?
  • How can data and information gathered from shelters be shared and used to inform response?

 

Facilitators

 

DAN HANFLING, Preparedness Forum Member Special Advisor, Emergency Preparedness and Response
Inova Health System

 

RICHARD SERINO, Preparedness Forum Member
Former Deputy Administrator and
Chief Operating Officer
Federal Emergency Management Agency

Coordination Within and Across Sectors:

 

  • What are the preferred methods for private sector receiving messages?
  • How are 2-1-1 systems, distress hotlines, and librarians coordinated throughout a region?
  • How is vertical and horizontal flow of information managed?
    • Two-way communication with and integration of health care systems?
  • Facilitation of “net-centric” health care coalition information sharing across regions to inform larger disaster picture and needs
  • How to support decision making of policy makers: using information specialists to identify and organize information and multi-agency coordination to synthesize best picture
Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Facilitators

 

JOHN OSBORN, Preparedness Forum Member
Operations Administrator
Mayo Clinic

 

MICHAEL MCCLENDON
Director
Office of Public Health Preparedness Emergency
Management Coordinator
Harris County Public Health and Environmental
Health Services

3:00 p.m.

BREAK

Session III: Wrap Up

3:15 p.m.

Final Plenary and Report Out by Facilitators

4:15 p.m.

Wrap-Up Discussion and Next Steps

 

  • What central themes emerged across topics?
    • Top identified challenges?
    • Top identified opportunities?

 

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair
Senior Partner
Martin, Blanck & Associates

4:45 p.m.

ADJOURN

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Regional Disaster Response Coordination
to Support Health Outcomes:
A Workshop Series

November 15, 2014
Grand Salon 12
Hilton New Orleans Riverside
2 Poydras Street, New Orleans, LA

8:30 a.m.

Welcoming Remarks, Challenges to Ensuring Health in Regional Disaster Preparedness: Community Planning and Engagement, Information Management and Coordination, and Surge Management

 

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair
Senior Partner
Martin, Blanck & Associates

8:40 a.m.

Overview

Session I: Case Study Scenarios

Session Objectives:

  • Explore pieces of information management during disasters through various recent case studies
    • Identify gaps that still exist for specific disasters (i.e., slow moving, no-notice, natural disaster, etc.)

9:00 a.m.

Panel Presentation: Surge Management Coordination Lessons Learned from Past Experiences

 

Evacuation/Tracking of Patients:
LORI UPTON
Regional Director of Emergency Management
Operations
SouthEast Texas Regional Advisory Council

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Surge Capacity of Public Health and Human Services:
MONIQUE DAVIS
Hudson Regional Health Commission
New Jersey

 

Lessons Learned in Coordination of Community Response:
ROSANNE PRATS
Executive Director, Emergency Preparedness
Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals

11:15 a.m.

Discussion with Panelists and Attendees

11:45 a.m.

Tabletop Scenario Overview

12:00 p.m.

LUNCH

Session II: Breakout Discussions

12:45 p.m.

Breakout Discussions by Focus Area

Patient Evacuation and Tracking

 

  • How is this coordinated across state/regional EMS/pre-hospital providers?
    • For patients’ evacuated pre-storm, how are they tracked to their new destination?
  • Are certain hospitals in a region pre-identified for certain types of patients (i.e., infectious disease, burn, trauma, pediatric)?
    • How are “specialty care” transfers managed?
  • How are pre-hospital patient information systems able to communicate?
    • How are pre-hospital patient systems able to integrate into standard EHRs in a region?
Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Facilitators

 

JOLENE WHITNEY
Specialty Care Program Manager
Bureau of EMS and Preparedness
Utah State Health Department

 

LORI UPTON
Director of Preparedness
SouthEast Texas Regional Advisory Council

Surge Capacity and Community Resilience

 

  • How is the “surge of public health and human services” managed?
    • Can public health surge (i.e., mental health/social services, medical sheltering, mortuary services, environmental surveillance, health transportation) help to alleviate clinical surge issues?
  • How can you “surge” to strengthen community resilience?
    • What processes are built into communities?
    • What regional services can be anticipated and addressed to keep people out of the hospitals?
  • Are there possibilities for increasing surge capacity in the region through new models of integrated/team-based care and home health support?

 

Facilitators

 

UMAIR SHAH
Director
Harris County Public Health and Environmental
Services

 

ANDREW STEVERMER
Regional Emergency Coordinator
Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and
Response
U.S. Department of Health and Human Services

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

Coordination of All Community Groups Engaged in Emergency Planning (coalitions, schools, NGOs, etc.)

 

  • How are these entities coordinated at state and regional levels?
    • Who is overseeing coordination of grassroots/community groups?
    • What challenges arise for regions that cross state lines?
  • Who is the lead during a medical or public health surge response?
    • Where do these community groups fit into a unified command system?
  • What lessons have been learned in regional disasters (e.g., Sandy, the Gulf)?
    • How are new “players” integrated into structure (e.g., child task forces in MO, NJ, and NY)?

 

Facilitators

 

JOHN HICK, Preparedness Forum Member
Medical Director for Emergency Preparedness
Hennepin County Medical
Center, Minnesota

 

ROSANNE PRATS
Executive Director
Emergency Preparedness
Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals

3:00 p.m.

BREAK

Session III: Wrap-Up

3:15 p.m.

Final Plenary and Report Out by Facilitators

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×

4:15 p.m.

Wrap-Up Discussion and Next Steps

 

  • What central themes emerged across topics?
    • Top identified challenges?
    • Top identified opportunities?

 

W. CRAIG VANDERWAGEN, Planning Committee Chair
Senior Partner
Martin, Blanck & Associates

4:45 p.m.

ADJOURN

Suggested Citation:"D--Agendas." Institute of Medicine. 2015. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes: Summary of a Workshop Series. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21713.
×
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Next: E-- Biographical Sketches of Invited Speakers and Panelists »
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When disaster strikes, it rarely impacts just one jurisdiction. Many catastrophic disaster plans include support from neighboring jurisdictions that likely will not be available in a regional disaster. Bringing multiple stakeholders together from sectors that do not routinely work with each other can augment a response to a disaster, but can also be extremely difficult because of the multi-disciplinary communication and coordination needed to ensure effective medical and public health response. As many communities within a region will have similar vulnerabilities, a logical step in planning is to establish responsibilities and capacities, and be able to work toward common goals to address all-hazards when the entire region is affected. To explore these considerations, the Institute of Medicine's Forum on Medical and Public Health Preparedness for Catastrophic Events organized a series of three regional workshops in 2014 to explore opportunities to strengthen the regional coordination required in response to a large scale multijurisdictional disaster. The purpose of each regional workshop was to discuss ways to strengthen coordination among multiple jurisdictions in various regions to ensure fair and equitable treatment of communities from all impacted areas. Regional Disaster Response Coordination to Support Health Outcomes summarizes the presentation and discussion of these workshops.

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