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Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
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A

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

HENRY A. OBERING III, Chair, is a Booz Allen Hamilton executive vice president. An expert in acquisition and program management, he works with aerospace clients in the Air Force and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Prior to joining Booz Allen Hamilton, he led a comprehensive review of the National Reconnaissance Office (NRO) for the Director of National Intelligence that provided a new charter for that organization. Mr. Obering retired from the U.S. Air Force as a lieutenant general with more than 35 years of experience in space and defense systems development, integration, and operations. He served as director of the 8,500-person Missile Defense Agency (MDA). He was the Department of Defense (DoD) acquisition executive for the nation’s $10 billion per year missile defense portfolio. In addition, he served as the program manager for the Ballistic Missile Defense System. Prior to his assignment at MDA, he planned and programmed 68 joint Air Force and international programs with a $28 billion budget as Mission Area Director for Information Dominance on the Air Staff. Mr. Obering entered the Air Force in 1973 after completing the University of Notre Dame’s ROTC program as a distinguished graduate. He received his pilot wings in 1975 and flew operational assignments in the F-4E. Later, he was assigned to the Space Shuttle Program and participated in 15 space shuttle launches as a NASA orbiter project engineer and was responsible for integrating firing room launch operations. Other assignments include tours with the Air Force Inspector General, the Defense Mapping Agency, and Electronic Systems Center. Mr. Obering has twice earned the DoD’s highest non-combat award, the Defense Distinguished Service Medal for leadership. He was honored by the National Defense Industrial Association’s Missile Defense Division with the 2011 Kadish Award for Acquisition Excellence. He received an M.S. in astronautical engineering from Stanford University.

CLAUDE M. BOLTON, JR., became the executive-in-residence for the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) in January 2008. His primary focus is assisting the DAU president achieve the congressional direction to recruit, retain, train, and educate the DoD acquisition workforce. Mr. Bolton is also a management consultant to defense and commercial companies and is a board member for several companies. Prior to becoming the DAU executive-in-residence, He served as the Assistant Secretary of the Army for Acquisition, Logistics, and Technology where he served as the Army acquisition executive, the senior procurement executive, and the science adviser to the Secretary. Mr. Bolton oversaw the Elimination of Chemical Weapons Program, and had oversight and executive authority over the Project and Contracting Office charged with Iraq reconstruction. He was responsible for appointing, managing, and evaluating program executive officers as well as managing the Army Acquisition Corps and Army Acquisition Workforce. Mr. Bolton retired as a major general in the U.S. Air Force following a highly decorated career. Some

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
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highlights of Mr. Bolton’s Air Force service include serving as the Commander, Air Force Security Assistance Center, where he managed foreign military sales programs with totals exceeding $90 billion that supported more than 80 foreign countries; serving as a test pilot for the F-4, F-111, and F-16; program executive officer for the Air Force Fighter and Bomber programs; and the first program manager for the Advance Tactical Fighter Technologies program, which evolved into the F-22 System Program Office. An experienced command pilot flying more than 40 different aircraft including Army helicopters; during the Vietnam War he flew 232 combat missions, 40 over North Vietnam. Mr. Bolton served as commandant of the Defense Systems Management College, and as inspector general and director of requirements at Air Force Materiel Command (AFMC) headquarters. He holds an M.S. in management from Troy State University and an M.A. in national security and strategic studies from the Naval War College. In 2006, he was awarded a D.Sc. (honoris causa) from Cranfield University. In 2007, he was awarded an honorary doctor of science degree from the University of Nebraska, Lincoln, his alma mater. Mr. Bolton is a member of the National Research Council’s (NRC’s) Air Force Studies Board and is a past member of the NRC Committee on Evaluation of U.S. Air Force Preacquisition Technology Development and the Committee on Optimizing U.S. Air Force and Department of Defense Review of Air Force Acquisition Programs.

MICHAEL D. GRIFFIN is chairman and CEO of Schafer Corporation, a leading provider of scientific, engineering, and technical services and products in the national security sector. He was previously King-McDonald Eminent Scholar and professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at the University of Alabama, Huntsville. He was the Administrator of NASA from 2005-2009 and prior to that was the Space Department Head at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL). He has also held numerous executive positions with industry, including president and chief operating officer of In-Q-Tel, CEO of Magellan Systems, general manager of Orbital Science Corporation’s Space Systems Group, and executive vice president and chief technical officer at Orbital. Dr. Griffin’s earlier career includes service as both chief engineer and associate administrator for exploration at NASA and as the deputy for technology at the Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO). Prior to joining SDIO in an executive capacity, he played a key role in conceiving and directing several “first of a kind” space tests in support of strategic defense research, development, and flight testing. These included the first space-to-space intercept of a ballistic missile in powered flight, the first broad-spectrum spaceborne reconnaissance of targets and decoys in midcourse flight, and the first space-to-ground reconnaissance of ballistic missiles during the boost phase. He also played a leading role in other space missions in earlier work at JHU/APL, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Computer Science Corporation. Dr. Griffin was an adjunct professor for 13 years at the University of Maryland, JHU, and George Washington University, offering courses in spacecraft design, applied mathematics, guidance and navigation, compressible flow, computational fluid dynamics, spacecraft attitude control, astrodynamics, and introductory aerospace engineering. He is a registered professional engineer in Maryland and California and is the lead author of over two dozen technical papers and the textbook Space Vehicle Design. Dr. Griffin is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the International Academy of Astronautics, an honorary fellow and the current president of AIAA, a fellow of the American Astronautical Society, and a senior member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers. He is the recipient of numerous honors and awards, including the NASA Exceptional Achievement Medal, the AIAA Space Systems Medal and Goddard Astronautics Award, the National Space Club’s Goddard Trophy, the Rotary National Award for Space Achievement, the Missile Defense Agency’s Ronald Reagan Award, and the DoD Distinguished Public Service Medal, the highest award that can be conferred on a non-government employee. He received his Ph.D. in aerospace engineering from the University of Maryland and has been recognized with honorary doctoral degrees from Florida Southern College and the University of Notre Dame.

TERRY J. JAGGERS is a former chief engineer of the U.S. Air Force and former deputy chief engineer of DoD. He graduated from the Industrial College of the Armed Forces with a master’s degree in national security, the Florida Institute of Technology with a master’s degree in business administration, the University of Illinois with a bachelor’s degree in aerospace engineering, and Western Illinois University with a bachelor’s degree in mathematics. He holds appointments as senior research fellow at the University of Texas, Austin, and associate fellowship at AIAA. He serves on numerous professional societies and advisory boards including the University of Illinois

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×

Aerospace Engineering Department, the University of Maryland System Research Institute, and the Science and Technology Policy Institute, where he provides science, technology, engineering, and STEM workforce advice to the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy and various agency S&T executives. Mr. Jaggers is currently chief scientist at Decisive Analytics Corporation, where he provides strategic advice to the CEO on the future of systems engineering, big data analytics, intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance fusion for missile defense and space, and cyber protection. Prior to this, he was the NRC board director for both U.S. Air Force and Office of Director of National Intelligence programs, overseeing $45 million in studies and recommendations to senior leaders spanning science and technology, development planning system acquisition, space protection, strategic deterrence, sustainment, and other critical national security issues. He is a former Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Systems Engineering and former Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Science, Technology, and Engineering where he provided program engineering and technical management policy for over $60 billion in major acquisition category I and II programs, functional development for more than 40,000 scientist and engineer professionals, and oversight for the $2 billion Air Force S&T program as S&T executive. He was directly responsible for instituting the early systems engineering initiative leading to the enactment of the Weapon Systems Acquisition Reform Act and subsequent revitalization of development planning, launched the first-ever Air Force STEM Strategic Plan leading to the Air Force STEM Advisory Council, and is a member of the national security space workforce cadre serving in launch and range operations, development planning, and joint space program office assignments.

GARY A. KYLE is president and CEO of Persistent Agility, Inc., a veteran-owned small business providing unique, innovative, and proven business and mission solutions. He leads and participates on senior-level teams that independently advise C-level executives and U.S. government senior leaders on complex multibillion dollar acquisition, contracting, and strategy matters. Mr. Kyle served as a principal at Booz Allen Hamilton, where he led a team of 52 business analytics consultants providing acquisition, contracting, cost, and financial expertise for Air Force clients. He was hand selected by the Air Force Space Command and the NRO as the business lead for the Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle Tiger Team that defined the program’s future acquisition tenets. As the Verizon senior vice president for global military sales, Mr. Kyle drove the organization’s record revenue growth. He also led the staff responsible for financial management and customer service for the $900+ million defense and international services organization. Mr. Kyle served as a senior Air Force officer and held high-visibility assignments both in the Pentagon and supporting multibillion dollar major defense acquisition programs. Mr. Kyle received numerous team and personal awards, including the DoD David Packard Excellence in Acquisition Award; DoD Value Engineering Award; DoD Defense Standardization Program National Honorary Award; Air Force John J. Welch, Jr. Award for Excellence in Acquisition Management (twice); Secretary of the Air Force Contracting Award for Outstanding Strategic Acquisition Reform; and Los Angeles Chapter of the Air Force Association Officer of the Year Award. Mr. Kyle holds an M.A. in telecommunications from the George Washington University, an M.S. in national resource strategy from National Defense University, and an M.S. in procurement and acquisition management from Northrop University. He is a graduate of the Defense Systems Management College Program Management Course and holds the highest DoD acquisition certifications in both program management and contracting.

JON S. OGG is CEO and principal partner at AeroVise LLC. Mr. Ogg retired in 2008 after 33 years with the Air Force serving in multiple assignments of increasing responsibility spanning defense systems research, development, and sustainment. His clients include the Air Force, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, DoD, and various defense companies. Mr. Ogg is an experienced systems engineer who spent his first 15 years tackling engineering challenges spanning virtually all Air Force fighter, bomber, airlift, and trainer propulsion systems in the field today. In 1991, he expanded his breadth of experience and responsibility to a critical leadership role serving as chief engineer for the F-22 Advanced Tactical Fighter (ATF) for nearly a decade, bringing it from source selection to production. Mr. Ogg served as chief/lead engineer for multiple propulsion programs, including F100, F110, TF-34, F101, YF120, YF119, and Cruise Missile systems. He led the development and initial production of F-22 ATF while acting as a primary interface to senior Air Force and Office of the Secretary of Defense personnel. He took the lead in revitalizing systems engineering across AFMC and stood up a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×

classified development planning organization responsible for application of advanced technologies in birthing new weapon systems. As the director of engineering for the research, acquisition, and sustainment arm of the Air Force, Mr. Ogg was responsible for a technical workforce of more than 12,000 and the processes and policies governing their operations. He led numerous high-level teams spanning acquisition strategies, affordability assessments for Global Hawk, T-6 Trainer, and F-22, request for proposal preparations, risk assessments, flight certifications, counter-IED solutions, and generic production cost-cutting initiatives. Mr. Ogg was the chief information officer for AFMC. In this capacity, he was the command’s primary catalyst for e-business transformation, cutting more than $200 million (20 percent) out of operations during his 2.5-year tenure. Mr. Ogg established direct links between 6.2/6.3 research and rapid fielding of counter-IED, advanced turbine engine, and hydrocarbon-based hypersonic propulsion. He institutionalized modeling and simulation and systems-of-systems focus as key enablers for reducing development cycle time while providing integrated solutions to warfighters’ needs. Mr. Ogg holds an M.S. in aeromechanical engineering from Ohio State University and an MBA from MIT.

SUE C. PAYTON is president of SCI Aerospace, Inc. She is a former Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition and former Deputy Under Secretary of Defense. Ms. Payton served as a presidential appointee in two presidential administrations, with responsibility for acquisition, procurement, and technology transition. In the Air Force, she directed an annual budget in excess of $30 billion that included major weapon systems such as unmanned aircraft, fighter aircraft and munitions, information technology, alternative energy, advanced manufacturing, and intelligence programs. Prior to her government service in 2001, she worked in senior leadership capacities at Lockheed Martin/Martin Marietta with responsibility for leading DoD initiatives in areas such as information technology, complex space systems, intelligence, and operations. Her program achievements have been noted on numerous television shows and dozens of media publications, and she is the inaugural recipient of the DoD 2011 Manufacturing Technology Champion Award. In her role as the president of SCI Aerospace, she serves on industry and research laboratory advisory boards. A graduate of Eastern Illinois University (EIU), she earned master’s degrees in systems acquisition management and computer information systems from the University of Southern California and Nova Southeastern University, receiving an honorary Ph.D. in public service from EIU. She is a member of many government-industry/educational/nonprofit organizations, including the EOD Warrior Foundation, U.S. Geospatial Intelligence Foundation, the EIU Foundation board of directors, the Air Force Academy Systems Engineering Program Advisory Council, Purdue University president’s council, SMU’s Caruth Institute, and the Doolittle Institute.

RICHARD T. ROCA is director emeritus at JHU/APL. He became director at JHU/APL in January 2000 and stepped down from that position in June 2010. While director, he led a not-for-profit University Affiliated Research Center that performs research and development work on behalf of DoD, primarily the U.S. Navy, and for NASA and other federal agencies. The organization has on the order of 5,000 employees, over two-thirds of whom are engineers and scientists. Currently, Dr. Roca is a member of the board of directors of the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory, Inc. He spent the first years of his professional career with the AT&T Corporation. He joined Bell Laboratories to design communications equipment and networks, and rose over three decades to major corporate leadership roles there. Immediately before his move to JHU/APL, Dr. Roca was vice president for IP services planning and development at AT&T Laboratories (the AT&T successor to Bell Labs). Other senior roles included chief technical officer of AT&T Solutions, the professional services business unit of AT&T; Civilian Markets Vice President in AT&T’s federal systems business unit; and executive director at AT&T Bell Laboratories of the Special Services Division and the Government Information Systems Division. He is a fellow of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers and a past vice president of its Board on Engineering Education. He is a visitor for the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology, which accredits U.S. engineering schools. Dr. Roca received an Sc.D. from MIT in mechanical engineering. In 1977, he was awarded a congressional fellowship and worked on the National Energy Act within the House Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Energy and Power. In 2011, he received the Secretary of Defense Award for Outstanding Public Service.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Research Council. 2015. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force: A Workshop Report. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21752.
×
Page 30
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The U.S. Air Force has experienced many acquisition program failures - cost overruns, schedule delays, system performance problems, and sustainability concerns - over program lifetimes. A key contributing factor is the lack of sufficient technical knowledge within the Air Force concerning the systems being acquired to ensure success.

To examine this issue, the Assistant Secretary of the Air Force for Acquisition requested that the Air Force Studies Board of the National Research Council undertake a workshop to identify the essential elements of the technical baseline - data and information to establish, trade-off, verify, change, accept, and sustain functional capabilities, design characteristics, affordability, schedule, and quantified performance parameters at the chosen level of the system hierarchy - that would benefit from realignment under Air Force or government ownership, and the value to the Air Force of regaining ownership under its design capture process of the future. Over the course of three workshops from November 2014 through January 2015, presenters and participants identified the barriers that must be addressed for the Air Force to regain technical baseline control to include workforce, policy and process, funding, culture, contracts, and other factors and provided a terms of reference for a possible follow-on study to explore the issues and make recommendations required to implement and institutionalize the technical baseline concept. Owning the Technical Baseline for Acquisition Programs in the U.S. Air Force summarizes the presentations and discussion of the three workshops.

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