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Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary (2015)

Chapter:Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
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B


Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches

Nupur Chaudhury, M.P.H., M.U.P., is a senior project manager with Rebuild by Design in Brooklyn, New York. She has worked at the nexus of urban planning and public health with projects in Ecuador, India, and the United States and through organizations such as the Clinton Foundation, UNICEF, United Nations-Habitat, the InterAmerican Development Bank, and New York City’s Department of City Planning. Previously at the Brownsville Partnership (an initiative of Rosanne Haggerty’s Community Solutions), Ms. Chaudhury designed and managed the entirety of the organization’s health programs in Brownsville, Brooklyn. She deliberately focused on acting as a bridge between city agencies and professionals in both the urban planning and public health fields to facilitate changes to the neighborhood’s urban form to improve health outcomes in Brownsville. She received a bachelor’s degree in the growth and structure of cities from Bryn Mawr College, a master’s degree in urban planning at New York University’s Robert F. Wagner School of Public Service, and a master’s in public health degree at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health.

Loretta V. Davis, M.S.A., has management experience that spans 25 years, two sectors, a myriad of key public health issues, and a full range of administrative and operational functions, including fiscal management, contract negotiations, policy and procedure development, personnel management, and program design and development. As the president and chief executive officer (CEO) of the Institute for Population Health, Ms. Davis joins the ranks of only four other city-level public health institute CEOs across the United States. In this position she champions the agency’s mission to advance positive health conditions in populations and communities. In addition to leading the formation of the Institute for Population Health, she has led the financial repair of five clinics across southeast Michigan, bringing them from deficit spending to viability; mobilized a county’s response to the H1N1 influenza virus pandemic; served as a principal partner in creating and implementing Michigan’s

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
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early response to HIV/AIDS; and partnered in crafting the HIV/AIDS response in Ethiopia, East Africa. She received a bachelor’s degree from the University of Michigan and a master of science in health service administration from Central Michigan University.

Hazel Edwards, Ph.D., AICP, Assoc. AIA, has had a unique 27-year career that combines place-related research with planning and urban design practice. Her research interests in quality of life are framed within urban design contexts, while they are focused primarily on residential and campus environments. Her design background has served as a foundation for her talent for translating and representing ideas and concepts as well as creating alternatives. This orientation has had a strong influence in all of her work, from campus planning (in which she led a number of comprehensive university planning and development activities) to master planning activities (for a community college in South Africa and residential environments), urban transportation studies, qualitative and quantitative analyses, predevelopment services (such as feasibility analyses, site access, and circulation review), building-related projects, community engagement, and proposal writing. Dr. Edwards earned degrees from Howard University (bachelor of architecture), Harvard University (master of architecture in urban design), and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (doctorate in regional planning). She also completed postdoctoral work in regional planning at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has taught at the School of Architecture and Planning at The Catholic University of America in Washington, DC, since 2007 and heads its Master of City and Regional Planning program.

Lynn R. Goldman, M.D., M.S., M.P.H., is a world-renowned epidemiologist, pediatrician, educator, and former regulator at the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Dr. Goldman was named dean of the George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services, as it was known then, in 2010. In 2014, she assumed the role as Michael and Lori Milken Dean of Public Health at the newly renamed Milken Institute School of Public Health at George Washington University. Her areas of focus are public health practice, children’s environmental health, disaster preparedness, and chemical and pesticide regulatory policy. As assistant administrator for toxic substances at EPA, she directed the Office of Prevention, Pesticides and Toxic Substances from 1993 through 1998. Prior to joining EPA, Dr. Goldman served as

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×

chief of the Division of Environmental and Occupational Disease Control of the California Department of Health Services. Dr. Goldman has served on numerous boards and expert committees, including the Committee on Environmental Health of the American Academy of Pediatrics and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Lead Poisoning Prevention Advisory Committee. Dr. Goldman is a member of the National Academy of Medicine, vice chair of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine, and a member of the Academies’ Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews.

Gregory Kats, M.B.A., M.P.A., is president of Capital E, a national clean energy advisory and venture capital firm. He previously served as managing director of the investment firm Good Energies. Prior to that he was director of financing for the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy at the U.S. Department of Energy, where he led national programs to develop and deploy renewable energy, energy efficiency, and advanced building technologies. Mr. Kats was the founding chair of the International Performance Measurement and Verification Protocol. He is a founder of the American Council on Renewable Energy and is a founder of the country’s first green bank, New Resource Bank. He was the principal adviser in developing Green Communities, now the national Green Affordable Housing design standard. Mr. Kats is a member of the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Steering Committee and serves as chair of the Energy and Atmosphere Technical Advisory Group for LEED. He earned an M.B.A. from Stanford University and, concurrently, an M.P.A. from Princeton University on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship.

Dan Kinkead, M.A.U.D., serves as director of projects for the Detroit Future City (DFC) Implementation Office. In this role, he provides leadership, strategic coordination, and technical expertise for the many projects that are led or supported by the DFC Implementation Office. Mr. Kinkead has worked with the DFC Implementation Office since its inception, wherein he led the initial process to build the implementation team, secure operational funding, develop the organization’s steering committee, and spearhead its first set of projects and initiatives. Prior to joining the DFC Implementation Office, he was a design principal with Hamilton Anderson Associates (HAA), where he led the design studio for architecture and urban design and managed land use and neighborhoods

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×

research and planning for DFC. This included leading the team that assembled the 350-page DFC Strategic Framework report that serves as the platform for transformation in Detroit. Prior to working with HAA, he was an urban designer with Skidmore Owings & Merrill, LLP, in New York City, where he worked on large-scale innovation district designs for continental Europe and China. Mr. Kinkead graduated from Harvard University with a master of architecture degree in urban design and earned a bachelor’s degree in architecture from the University of Kentucky. He is a registered architect, and his work has been published in a range of national and international media, including Architect, The Plan, and Architectural Record.

Brendan Shane, J.D., M.S., is the director of the Office of Policy and Sustainability at the District of Columbia Department of the Environment. He is responsible for developing policy and programs in waste management, renewable and clean energy, climate, and green building. He is a principal staffer for the mayor’s Sustainable DC initiative, working across the District Government and with community stakeholders to define and implement the mayor’s vision of making the District the greenest city in the nation. A watershed hydrologist and attorney by training, he was director of Environmental Policy and Programs with the Anacostia Waterfront Corporation, and prior to that he was an associate attorney with Van Ness Feldman, P.C. He received a law degree from Georgetown University and an M.S. in geology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Matthew Trowbridge, M.D., M.P.H., is an associate professor at the University of Virginia School of Medicine with a special interest in the impact of the built environment on public health. He studies how health-promoting educational design strategies can support active communities and reduce incidence rates of childhood obesity. Dr. Trowbridge is a 2013–2014 Mark Ginsberg Sustainability Fellow of the U.S. Green Building Council and received resources to further advance the understanding of how sustainable buildings, neighborhoods, communities, and cities can lead to healthier, more productive lives for everyone. He is interested in providing more opportunities for public health researchers to engage directly with design firms and communities to keep learning how to target health promotion priorities and improve access to healthy environments. He received an M.D. from the Emory University School of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×

Medicine and an M.P.H. from the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University.

Kimberlydawn Wisdom, M.D., M.S., is a board-certified emergency medicine physician who practiced for 20 years at the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in Detroit, Michigan. She also founded and directed both the Institute of Multicultural Health at HFHS and a National Minority Quality Forum award-winning community-based health screening initiative entitled AIMHI (African American Initiative for Male Health Improvement), which focused on improving the health of those disproportionately affected by poor health outcomes. She is an assistant professor of medical education at the University of Michigan (UM) Medical Center and serves as adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the UM School of Public Health. In February 2003, Dr. Wisdom was appointed by Governor Jennifer M. Granholm to be Michigan’s—and the nation’s—first state-level surgeon general to address Michigan’s less than desirable health status. She has focused on physical inactivity, unhealthy eating habits, childhood lead poisoning, tobacco use, chronic disease, infant mortality, unintended pregnancy, and health disparities, among other areas of concern. In April 2007, Dr. Wisdom returned to HFHS as vice president of community health education and wellness while retaining her post as surgeon general. In March 2011, Dr. Wisdom was promoted to senior vice president of community health and equity and chief wellness officer. She continues to develop and lead efforts that improve the health of the community and address health care equity and health disparities. She is the recipient of numerous awards, has authored several peer-reviewed publications, and appeared on national television, including ABC’s Nightline, and has made presentations to audiences across the United States and internationally.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
Page85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Speaker and Moderator Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization: Workshop Summary. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21831.
×
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A particularly valuable opportunity to improve public health arises when an urban area is being redesigned and rebuilt following some type of serious disruption, whether it is caused by a sudden physical event, such as a hurricane or earthquake, or steady economic and social decline that may have occurred over decades. On November 10, 2014, the Institute of Medicine's Roundtable on Environmental Health Sciences, Research, and Medicine held a workshop concerning the ways in which the urban environment, conceived broadly from factors such as air quality and walkability to factors such as access to fresh foods and social support systems, can affect health. Participants explored the various opportunities to reimagine the built environment in a city and to increase the role of health promotion and protection during the process of urban revitalization. Bringing Public Health into Urban Revitalization summarizes the presentations and discussions from this workshop.

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