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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
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Appendix A

Committee and Staff Biographies

Joseph E. Shepherd, Chair. Joseph E. Shepherd, Ph.D., is the C. L. “Kelly” Johnson Professor of Aeronautics and Mechanical Engineering and vice president for student affairs at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) in Pasadena. His research interests are fluid and solid dynamics, combustion chemistry, thermodynamics, and dynamic structural response with applications to explosions, propulsion, high-speed flight, and energy technology. Since 1980 he has carried out research on hydrogen combustion behavior during severe accidents in nuclear power plants as well as in nuclear material processing and storage facilities. He has worked with private industry, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. National Laboratories, and international organizations to evaluate hydrogen control methodologies and assess potential hazards including the effects of explosions. Dr. Shepherd earned his Ph.D. in applied physics from Caltech in 1981. He served as a member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories from 1980 to 1986. From 1986 to 1993 Dr. Shepherd was an assistant professor of mechanical engineering at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He has been on the faculty at Caltech since 1993. Dr. Shepherd served on the National Research Council Committee on Determining Basic Research Needs to Interrupt the Improvised Explosive Device Delivery Chain.

Robert A. Bari. Robert A. Bari, Ph.D., is a senior physicist at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He has more than 40 years of experience in the field of nuclear energy and has directed numerous studies of advanced nuclear energy concepts involving nuclear energy technology performance,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

nonproliferation, safety, economics, and waste management. For more than 25 years, Dr. Bari served at all levels of management at Brookhaven National Laboratory. He is currently international co-chairman of the working group of the Generation IV International Forum (Gen IV) that has developed a comprehensive methodology for evaluation of proliferation resistance and physical protection of all new nuclear energy concepts being proposed within by Gen IV. Dr. Bari has served on the Board of Directors of the American Nuclear Society (ANS) and is past chairman of the ANS Consensus Standards Committee for Probabilistic Risk Assessment. He is past president of the International Association for Probabilistic Safety Assessment and Management. For his achievements in nuclear safety, he was awarded the Theo J. “Tommy” Thompson Award in 2003 by the American Nuclear Society. In 2004, he received the Brookhaven National Laboratory Award for Outstanding Achievement in Science and Technology. He was awarded membership in the Phi Beta Kappa, Sigma Xi, and Sigma Pi Sigma honor societies and is an elected fellow of both the American Nuclear Society and the American Physical Society. Dr. Bari has served as an adjunct faculty member and advisor to several major universities in the field of nuclear technology. Dr. Bari recently chaired a workshop of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences on safety and security culture held jointly between the United States and Brazil in Sao Paolo. He received his doctorate in physics from Brandeis University (1970) and his bachelor’s degree in physics from Rutgers University (1965).

Jan Beyea. Jan Beyea, Ph.D., is chief scientist at Consulting in the Public Interest, where he consults on energy/environmental topics for local, national, and international organizations. He has expertise in energy technologies and associated environmental and health concerns and has written numerous articles on energy and the environment, including articles on planning for reactor accidents. His current research interests are in the field of epidemiology. Dr. Beyea previously served as chief scientist and vice president of the National Audubon Society and held positions at Holy Cross College, Columbia University, and Princeton University’s Center for Energy and Environmental Studies. He received a B.A. from Amherst College and a Ph.D. in physics from Columbia University. Dr. Beyea has been a member of numerous advisory committees and panels, including the National Research Council’s Board on Energy and Environmental Systems, Energy Engineering Board, Committee on Assessment of the Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy, Committee on America’s Energy Future, Committee on Alternative Energy R&D Strategies, Committee to Review DOE’s Fine Particulates Research Plan, and Committee on Alternatives for Controlling the Release of Solid Materials from Nuclear Regulatory Commission-Licensed Facilities. He has also served on the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board’s Task

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

Force on Economic Modeling, has been a member of the policy committee of the Recycling Advisory Council, and has advised various studies of the Office of Technology Assessment. In 2012, he recently served as a guest editor for, and contributor to, a theme issue of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists on the subject of risks from low-level radiation. Dr. Beyea is an elected Fellow of the American Physical Society.

Michael L. Corradini. Michael L. Corradini, Ph.D., is a professor in the Department of Engineering Physics at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Corradini’s research focus is nuclear engineering and multiphase flow with specific interests that include light-water reactor safety, fusion reactor design and safety, waste management and disposal, vapor explosions research and molten core–concrete interaction research, and energy policy analysis. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from Marquette University and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in nuclear engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is a member of the American Institute of Chemical Engineers, the American Society of Engineering Education, and the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, and a Fellow of the American Nuclear Society. Dr. Corradini has received numerous awards including the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award, the American Nuclear Society reactor safety best paper award, and the University of Wisconsin, Madison, campus teaching award. He has served on various technical review committees, including the research review panel of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. He currently serves on the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards and was president of the American Nuclear Society in 2013-2014. Dr. Corradini was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 1998.

Vijay K. Dhir. Vijay K. Dhir, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering and was dean of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Henry Samueli School of Engineering and Applied Science from 2003 to 2015. He also leads the boiling heat transfer laboratory, which conducts pioneering work in fundamental and applied sciences involving boiling, an efficient process of heat removal. Currently, his laboratory is involved in the study of flow boiling, microgravity boiling, and nuclear reactor thermal hydraulics. Born in India, Dr. Dhir received his B.Sc. from Punjab Engineering College in Chandigarh, India, and his master of technology from the Indian Institute of Technology in Kanpur, India. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Kentucky. In the late 1960s, he worked for a short period in industry as an engineer, and for the past 35 years he has been a consultant for numerous organizations. Dr. Dhir served as chair of the UCLA Department of Mechanical and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

Aerospace Engineering from 1994 to 2000. In 2004, he was selected as an inductee into the University of Kentucky’s Engineering Hall of Distinction, and in 2012 he received his alma mater’s honorary Ph.D. degree. The American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) has honored him with the Heat Transfer Memorial Award and the Robert Henry Thurston Lecture Award. The American Institute of Chemical Engineers honored him with the Donald Q. Kern award and the Max Jakob Memorial Award (awarded jointly with ASME). He is recipient of the Technical Achievement Award of the Thermal Hydraulics Division of the American Nuclear Society. Most recently, he received the Lifetime Achievement Award at ICCES (the International Conference on Computational & Experimental Engineering and Sciences). Dr. Dhir has more than 300 publications in archival journals and proceedings of conferences. He was elected to the National Academy of Engineering in 2006.

Michael W. Golay. Michael W. Golay, Ph.D., is a professor of nuclear science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), where he has worked since 1971. He is director of the Reactor Technology Course for Utility Executives and the Nuclear Operational Risk Management Course, both cosponsored by MIT and the National Academy for Nuclear Training. Most recently he has focused his research and teaching on improving nuclear power performance both in the United States and internationally, particularly through use of probabilistic and dynamic methods of analysis. He has also been an active advisor to governmental and industrial organizations, particularly concerning risk-informed regulation and nuclear nonproliferation. Dr. Golay received his Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from Cornell University in 1969 and performed postdoctoral research at Rennselaer Polytechnic Institute. In 1980, he was a visiting researcher at Électricité de France. He has served on the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations Advisory Council, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s Research Review Committee, the Department of Energy’s TOPS Committee (on nonproliferation), and national laboratory and nuclear power plant oversight committees. He is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science and the American Nuclear Society.

Barbara L. Hamrick. Barbara L. Hamrick, J.D., CHP, is the radiation safety officer at the University of California, Irvine, Medical Center where she oversees the use of radiation and radioactive materials in medical and research applications, including use in radiology, nuclear medicine, radiation oncology, pathology, and neurology. Ms. Hamrick received a B.S. and an M.S. in physics from the University of California, Irvine, in 1985 and 1987, respectively. She also received a J.D. from Loyola Law School in Los Angeles and was admitted to the California State Bar in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

1999. Prior to joining the staff at the Medical Center, Ms. Hamrick worked for 18 years in regulatory agencies at the local, state, and federal levels, including the Los Angeles County Office of Radiation Management, the California Department of Public Health, and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Her work involves the application of health physics to a diverse set of problems, including survey and remediation at decommissioning facilities, external and internal dose assessments, air and water effluent modeling and monitoring, emergency planning, population monitoring, and radioactive waste management and disposal. Ms. Hamrick also has extensive experience and knowledge related to federal and state statutes and regulations governing the use of radiation and radioactive materials. She has participated in and co-chaired interagency working groups established to develop regulation, policy, and guidance related to the use of radiation and radioactive material in coordination with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, U.S. Department of Homeland Security, U.S. Department of Energy, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Organization of Agreement States, and Conference of Radiation Control Program Directors. Ms. Hamrick is currently serving as a member of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Radiation Advisory Committee. She also serves as past president of the Health Physics Society. She was certified by the American Board of Health Physics in 2002.

Paul A. Locke. Paul A. Locke, Dr.P.H., J.D., M.P.H., an environmental health scientist and attorney, is an associate professor at the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health. He holds his primary appointment in the Department of Environmental Health Sciences and a joint appointment in the Department of Health Policy and Management. Dr. Locke directs the Doctor of Public Health Program in Environmental Health Sciences. Dr. Locke’s research and practice focus on how decision makers use scientific data and research in regulation and policy making and how environmental health sciences influence the policy-making process. His areas of study include designing and evaluating radiation protection initiatives and radiation policies, especially in low-dose radiation science, radon risk reduction, safe disposal of high-level radioactive waste, and uranium mining and recovery operations. He holds an M.P.H. from Yale University School of Medicine, a Dr.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, and a J.D. from Vanderbilt University School of Law. Dr. Locke was a member of the National Academy of Sciences Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board from 2003 to 2009, and chaired the National Academy’s Committee on Uranium Mining in Virginia. Dr. Locke is admitted to practice law before the bars of New York and the District of Columbia, the Southern District Court of New York, and the U.S. Supreme Court.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

Thomas G. Moser. Thomas G. Moser, U.S. Navy (retired), is an independent consultant who provides antiterrorism and security expertise to federal, state, and local government entities and private-sector clients. He holds a B.S. in business administration from Waynesburg College in Pennsylvania and an M.B.A. from Southern Illinois University. While on active service as a career Navy SEAL Officer, Mr. Moser served as commanding officer of the Navy’s unique antiterrorism RED CELL team, commanding officer of SEAL Team FOUR, commanding officer of the Naval Special Warfare Development Group (a classified special SEAL Unit), and as chief of staff at the Joint Special Operations Command. Following his naval career, Mr. Moser served as a counterterrorism and special operations consultant and exercise planner for Department of Defense Special Operations Units. He developed plans to exercise the nation’s military and first-responder units’ response to incidents involving the use of chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear weapons of mass destruction. He later worked with the Department of Energy (DOE) as the site manager of the Andrews Air Force Base laboratory facility that was responsible for one of the nation’s Nuclear Emergency Search Teams. Following service at DOE, Mr. Moser was selected to serve as one of the first Department of Homeland Security (DHS) Protective Security Advisors (PSAs) and served as PSA to the State of South Carolina, representing DHS as an onsite critical infrastructure and vulnerability assessment specialist. Mr. Moser participated in comprehensive security assessments at nuclear power plants and material production facilities in North and South Carolina and served on the National Research Council Committee on Risk-Based Approaches for Securing the DOE Nuclear Weapons Complex. More recently, Mr. Moser participated in a survey and assessment of the Coast Guard Service of a Gulf Coast Cooperative member state, addressing counterpiracy and countersmuggling missions in the Persian Gulf and Arabian Sea. Mr. Moser is an American Society of Industrial Security Certified Protection Professional and Physical Security Professional.

Arthur T. Motta. Arthur T. Motta, Ph.D., is Chair of the Nuclear Engineering Program and a professor of nuclear engineering and of materials science and engineering at Pennsylvania State University. His research focuses on the environmental degradation of materials in the reactor environment with specific emphasis on nuclear fuel cladding. His research interests include radiation damage, corrosion and hydrogen ingress, mechanical behavior of materials, and materials characterization. He holds a B.Sc. in mechanical engineering and an M.Sc. in nuclear engineering from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and a Ph.D. in nuclear engineering from the University of California, Berkeley. Before coming to Penn State, he worked for the CEA at the Centre for Nuclear Studies in Grenoble, France, and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

for Atomic Energy of Canada Limited at the Chalk River Laboratories in Canada. He is a member of the editorial board of the Journal of Nuclear Materials. He received the Mishima Award from the American Nuclear Society for sustained contributions to nuclear fuel research and has just been awarded the Kroll Medal from ASTM for siginificant contributions to zirconium metallurgy.

John A. Orcutt. John A. Orcutt, Ph.D., is a distinguished professor of geophysics at Scripps Institution of Oceanography and a secretary of the Navy/Chief of Naval Operations Oceanography Chair. He received his B.S. in mathematics and physics from the U.S. Naval Academy in Annapolis, his M.Sc. in physical chemistry as a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Liverpool, and his Ph.D. in earth sciences from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. He served as a submariner in the U.S. Navy and was the Chief Engineer on USS Kamehameha including a shipyard overhaul with refueling of the nuclear plant. His research interests include the exploitation of information technology for the collection and processing of real-time environmental data as well as marine and continental seismology and geophysics. He is chair of the MEDEA Ocean Panel and recently completed a review of hydroacoustics monitoring by the UN Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty Office in the Indian Ocean. He is a charter member of the National Research Council Ocean Studies Board and is serving another two terms nearly 25 years after his first. He is the principal investigator of a BP research institute at Scripps, which began operations in 2004. He received the Ewing Medal from the U.S. Navy and the American Geophysical Union in 1994; the Newcomb-Cleveland Prize from the American Association for the Advancement of Science in 1983; and the Marine Technology Society’s Lockheed Martin Award for Ocean Science and Technology in 2007. He chaired the National Research Council review of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Tsunami Warning System and the Ocean Panel of the Climate, Energy and National Security Committee. He served as president of the American Geophysical Union from 2004 to 2006 and was elected as an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Astronomical Society in 2005. He was elected to the American Philosophical Society in 2002 and the National Academy of Engineering in 2011.

Emilie M. Roth. Emilie M. Roth, Ph.D., is the owner and principal scientist of Roth Cognitive Engineering. A cognitive psychologist, Dr. Roth’s work involves the analysis of human problem solving and decision making in real-world environments (e.g., military command and control, intelligence analysis, nuclear power plant emergencies, railroad operations, and surgery), and the impacts of support systems (e.g., computerized procedures, alarm systems, advanced graphical displays, and new forms of automation)

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

on cognitive performance. Dr. Roth has conducted empirical studies of naturalistic decision making, developed and applied cognitive task analysis and cognitive work analysis techniques for understanding the cognitive demands imposed by work environments, and developed principles for effective decision support for individuals and teams. Dr. Roth has supported design of first-of-a-kind systems including the command center for a next-generation Navy ship; a next-generation nuclear power plant control room; and work-centered support systems for flight planning and monitoring for an Air Force organization. She received her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. She serves on the editorial board of the journals Human Factors and the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making. She was elected a Fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She recently participated in the National Research Council Committee on Human-System Design Support for Changing Technology.

Elizabeth Q. Ten Eyck. Elizabeth Q. Ten Eyck is president of ETE Consulting, Inc. She is an expert in domestic and international nuclear safeguards and security for government-owned and -licensed commercial nuclear facilities and has participated in vulnerability assessments of U.S. critical infrastructure for the Department of Homeland Security. Ms. Ten Eyck received her B.S. in electrical engineering from the University of Maryland. She has more than 30 years of career federal service, first as a security engineer for the U.S. Secret Service, then as director of the Office of Safeguards and Security for the U.S. Department of Energy, and, until she retired in 2000, as director of the Division of Fuel Cycle Safety and Safeguards for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC), where she managed the safety and safeguards regulatory program for commercial fuel-cycle facilities. During her career at the USNRC, she also managed transportation activities and the safeguards program for nuclear power reactors. Ms. Ten Eyck served on the National Research Council Committee on Transportation of Radioactive Waste.

Frank N. von Hippel. Frank N. von Hippel, Ph.D., is a senior research physicist and professor of public and international affairs emeritus at Princeton University’s Program on Science and Global Security, which he co-founded. In 1989, he co-founded the journal Science & Global Security. He was a founding co-chair and continues as a member of the nongovernmental International Panel on Fissile Materials, which includes experts from 17 countries and develops proposals for initiatives to reduce global stocks of plutonium and highly enriched uranium and the numbers of locations where they can be found. He received a Ph.D. in nuclear physics from the University of Oxford and a B.A. from Massachusetts Institute of Technol-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

ogy. As a former assistant director for national security in the White House Office of Science and Technology, Dr. von Hippel’s areas of policy research include nuclear arms control and nonproliferation, energy, and checks and balances in policy making for technology. He has been involved in reactor safety issues since he served as a member of he American Physical Society’s 1974-1975 Study Group on Light Water Reactor Safety. Prior to going to Princeton, he worked for 10 years in the field of elementary-particle theoretical physics. Dr. von Hippel’s awards include the American Physical Society (APS) 2010 Leo Szilard Lectureship Award for outstanding work and leadership in using physics to illuminate public policy on nuclear arms control and nonproliferation, nuclear energy, and energy efficiency; the American Association for the Advancement of Science 1994 Hilliard Roderick Prize for Excellence in Science, Arms Control and International Security; a MacArthur Foundation Prize Fellowship (1993-1998); and the 1977 APS Forum Award for Promoting the Understanding of the Relationship of Physics and Society. Dr. von Hippel recently served on the National Research Council Committee on Best Practices for Nuclear Materials Protection, Control and Accounting.

Loring A. Wyllie, Jr. Loring A. Wyllie, Jr., M.S., is chairman emeritus of the board and senior principal at Degenkolb Engineers. He has more than 45 years of professional experience in seismic evaluations, analysis, and design of strengthening measures for improved seismic performance. He serves as consultant to several University of California campuses, various commercial and architectural clients, Department of Energy laboratories, and many others. He received his B.S. and M.S. from the University of California, Berkeley. He is a past chairman of the state historical building safety board, whose mandate is to evaluate and analyze methods for strengthening buildings that preserve their historic character. He is also the past president of the Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. His contributions to the profession of structural engineering were recognized by his election to the National Academy of Engineering in 1990. In 2007, he was honored with the prestigious Outstanding Projects and Leaders Lifetime Achievement Award by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). He was made an honorary member of the Structural Engineers Association of Northern California and Earthquake Engineering Research Institute. In recognition of his expertise in concrete design and performance, the American Concrete Institute named him an honorary member in 2000. Mr. Wyllie was elected an honorary member of ASCE in 2001.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×

Study Director

Kevin D. Crowley. Kevin D. Crowley, Ph.D., is senior board director of the Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board (NRSB) at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in Washington, DC. He is responsible for planning and managing the NRSB’s portfolio of studies on radiation health effects, radioactive waste management and environmental cleanup, and nuclear security and terrorism and has personally directed or co-directed more than 25 Academies studies in these and other subject areas. Dr. Crowley also is the principal investigator of the Academies’ Radiation Effects Research Foundation project, which provides scientific support for the long-term study of health effects arising from exposures to ionizing radiation among World War II atomic-bombing survivors. Dr. Crowley held positions at Miami University of Ohio, the University of Oklahoma, and the U.S. Geological Survey before joining the Academies staff in 1993. He received his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in geology from Princeton University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
Page 205
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
Page 206
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
Page 208
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Lessons Learned from the Fukushima Nuclear Accident for Improving Safety and Security of U.S. Nuclear Plants: Phase 2. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21874.
×
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Next: Appendix B: Presentations »
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