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Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making (2016)

Chapter: Study Committee Biographical Information

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Page 179
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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Study Committee
Biographical Information

Martin Wachs, Chair, is Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Professor of City and Regional Planning, University of California. He was Director of the RAND Transportation, Space, and Technology Program and Professor at the Pardee RAND Graduate School. Before joining RAND in 2005, he was Director of the Institute of Transportation Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, and spent 25 years at the University of California at Los Angeles, where he served three terms as chairman of the Department of Urban Planning. He is author of more than 150 articles and four books on subjects related to the relationships between transportation, land use, and air quality; transportation needs of the elderly; techniques for the evaluation of transportation systems; and the use of performance measurement in transportation planning. His research also addresses issues of equity in transportation policy, problems of crime in public transit systems, and the response of transportation systems to natural disasters, including earthquakes. His most recent work focuses on transportation finance in relation to planning and policy. He has chaired many Transportation Research Board (TRB) study committees, including the Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program, the Committee for a Study of Urban Transportation Congestion Pricing, and the Committee on Determination of the State of the Practice in Metropolitan Area Travel Forecasting. He has served on many other TRB committees, including the TRB Executive Committee, which he chaired in 2000. He holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the City University of New York and a master’s degree and a PhD in transportation planning from Northwestern University.

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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J. Barry Barker is Executive Director of the Transit Authority of River City in Louisville, Kentucky. He was previously General Manager of Metro in Akron, Ohio, and Assistant General Manager for Marketing and Management for the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. He is a former chair of the Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Oversight and Project Selection Committee, has served on several TCRP panels, and was a member of the National Research Council (NRC) Committee for a Study of Contracting Out Transit Services. He has chaired the National Transit Institute Board and served on the Easter Seals Project ACTION National Steering Committee, the TRB Executive Committee, and the Subcommittee on Planning and Policy Review. He is chair of TRB’s Transit Research Analysis Committee. He is a National Associate of the National Academies and recipient of the 2012 Sharon D. Banks Award for Humanitarian Leadership in Transportation. He earned a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Case Western Reserve University and a master’s degree in public administration from Cleveland State University.

John C. Bennett has more than four decades of experience in rail and public transportation policy and planning analysis. He retired from Amtrak as Assistant Vice President for Policy Management in 2011. He held several other executive positions at Amtrak, including Assistant Vice President for Policy Standards and Business Integration and Vice President for Transportation Planning and Policy for the Northeast Corridor. He has experience in strategic planning for intercity railroads and commuter railroads in the private and public sectors and in capital program management. While at Amtrak, he aided in the development of the Northeast Corridor Strategic Business Unit’s Strategic Plan, which supported development of higher-speed rail service in the corridor. Before joining Amtrak, he was Vice President of Infrastructure and Systems at the Long Island Rail Road and held senior management positions at the consulting firms KPMG Peat Marwick and Booz Allen Hamilton. He was a member of the Passenger Rail Working Group of the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission. He holds bachelor’s and master’s degrees in civil engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Page 181
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

Alan J. Bing retired in 2011 as Technical Specialist for ICF International. His area of expertise is railroad freight and passenger train technologies and systems. He is a past chair of the TRB Committee on Passenger Rail Equipment and Systems Integration and the Committee for Review of the Federal Railroad Administration’s R&D Program. He was also a member of the TRB Committee for Assessment of Federal High-Speed Ground Transportation R&D. He was principal investigator for the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) project that developed the Guidebook for Implementing Passenger Rail Service on Shared Passenger and Freight Corridors. He holds a PhD in mechanical engineering from the University of Nottingham, United Kingdom.

Matthew A. Coogan is an independent consultant and director of the New England Transportation Institute. He has expertise in transportation behavior and intermodal transportation planning and specializes in the deployment of new transportation technologies. He has served as principal investigator for numerous studies of high-speed rail, conventional rail, aviation, and highway intercity travel. From 1983 to 1991, he was Undersecretary for Transportation for Massachusetts, where he was project director for the Central Artery–Third Harbor Tunnel Project and cochair of the Coalition of Northeastern Governors High Speed Rail Task Force. From 1973 to 1979 he was Assistant Secretary of Transportation, and from 1979 to 1983 he was Senior Project Coordinator for the Boston Redevelopment Authority. He served as a member of the TRB Committee for a Study of High-Speed Surface Transportation in the United States and the Committee for the Critique of the Federal Research Program on Magnetic Levitation Systems. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University.

Thomas B. Deen (NAE) is former Executive Director of TRB, a position he held from 1980 to 1994. In that position, he led efforts to create the $150 million Strategic Highway Research Program and began TRB’s policy studies program. Before joining TRB, he was Chairman and President of Alan Voorhees and Associates, a transportation engineering and consulting company with clients worldwide. He served as chief planner of the Washington Metro subway system during its development in the

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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1960s. During this period he pioneered development and application of planning methods used worldwide in succeeding decades. His areas of expertise are surface transportation technology, performance, economics, financing, planning, and project feasibility. Since retiring from TRB, he has served as chairman of a committee preparing a national strategic plan for intelligent transportation systems, vice chairman of a national committee recommending safe methods for transporting radioactive waste from nuclear power plants to a geological repository, and chairman of a committee recommending transportation improvements for the Washington, D.C., region, including the building of the Intercounty Connector in Maryland. He was also cochair of a Maryland committee recommending approaches to building a magnetic levitation train system in the Northeast Corridor and chairman of a committee investigating the causes of a deck construction failure on the Chesapeake Bay Bridge. Other committees he has served on include the Committee on the Federal Funding of Transportation Improvements in Defense Base Closure and Realignment Commission Cases, the Committee for the Strategic Highway Research Program 2, the Committee for a Determination of the State of the Practice in Metropolitan Area Travel Forecasting, and the Committee for a Study on Transportation and a Sustainable Environment. In 1998 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. In 2003 TRB established the annual Thomas B. Deen Distinguished Lectureship in his honor, and in 2009 he was awarded the Frank Turner Medal. In 2011 he was presented the ITS Hall of Fame Award, in 2014 he was elected an honorary member of the Institute of Transportation Engineers, and in 2015 he was named a member of the University of Kentucky Hall of Distinguished Alumni. He holds a bachelor’s degree in civil engineering from the University of Kentucky and completed 1-year graduate programs at the University of Chicago and Yale University.

Genevieve Giuliano is Professor and Senior Associate Dean of Research and Technology in the School of Policy, Planning, and Development, University of Southern California (USC). She is also Director of the METRANS joint USC and California State University at Long Beach Transportation Center. In 2009 she was named the Margaret and John Ferraro Chair in Effective Local Government for her work in regional transportation policy. Her research focuses on the relationships between

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

land use and transportation, transportation policy analysis, and information technology applications in transportation. She has published more than 140 papers on these and other topics. She serves on the editorial boards of Urban Studies and the Journal of Transport Policy. She is a past chair of the TRB Executive Committee and was named a National Associate of the National Academies in 2003. She received the TRB William Carey Award for Distinguished Service in 2006 and was the Thomas B. Deen Distinguished Lecturer in 2007. She has served on numerous TRB and NRC committees, including the Panel on Mitigation for America’s Climate Choices.

Mark Hansen is Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of California, Berkeley, and codirector of the National Center for Excellence in Aviation Operations Research. His research interests include transportation economics, policy and planning, air transportation, and public transportation. He has written extensively on air transportation network flows, the impact of aircraft size on airline demand and market share, and aviation delays and operational performance. He was a member of the TRB Committee on Airfield and Airspace Capacity and Delay. He earned a bachelor’s degree in physics and philosophy from Yale University and a master’s degree in city planning and a PhD in transportation engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Keith L. Killough is Assistant Director for Travel Demand Modeling and Analysis and Chief of the Multimodal Planning Division of the Arizona Department of Transportation. Before joining the state transportation department in 2008, he was Director of Information Services for the Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG), where he was responsible for implementing travel simulation models and applying quantitative analyses to support regional transportation and air quality management planning. Before joining SCAG, he was owner of a consulting company specializing in transportation planning and modeling. Previously, he was Deputy Director for Countywide Planning for the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transit Authority. He has also worked for the Southern California Rapid Transit District, where he headed the Planning and Policy Analysis Section. He chairs the TRB Joint Subcommittee on Statewide Travel Demand Forecasting and the NCHRP

Page 184
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

Panel on Long-Distance and Rural Travel Transferable Parameters for Statewide Travel Forecasting Models. He was a member of the TRB Committee for Review of Travel Demand Modeling by the Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments. He earned a bachelor’s degree in urban studies and planning from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Charles F. Manski (NAS) has been Board of Trustees Professor in Economics at Northwestern University since 1997. He was previously a faculty member at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, and Carnegie Mellon University. His research spans econometrics, judgment and decision, and the analysis of social policy. He is author of Identification for Prediction and Decision (Harvard 2007), Social Choice with Partial Knowledge of Treatment Response (Princeton 2005), Partial Identification of Probability Distributions (Springer 2003), Identification Problems in the Social Sciences (Harvard 1995), and Analog Estimation Methods in Econometrics (Chapman and Hall 1988). He is coauthor of College Choice in America (Harvard 1983) and coeditor of Evaluating Welfare and Training Programs (Harvard 1992) and Structural Analysis of Discrete Data with Econometric Applications (MIT 1981). He is a member of the Committee on Deterrence and the Death Penalty of the Division of Behavior and Social Sciences and Education of the National Academies. He is a member of the National Academy of Sciences, Fellow of the Econometric Society, Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. He holds a bachelor’s degree and a PhD in economics from MIT.

Nancy A. McGuckin is an independent consultant with expertise in travel behavior. She recently completed forecasts of travel by older Americans, migration and immigration patterns and trends, and nonwork travel for the National Surface Transportation Policy and Revenue Study Commission. She previously worked for Barton-Aschman of Parsons Transportation Group, where she developed travel and ridership forecasts for major investment studies, including high-speed rail systems in Shanghai, San Juan, and Bangkok. She specializes in social and demographic indicators of travel demand and integrates data from safety, health, economic, energy, time use, and other pertinent sources to develop the context for planning

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

and policy initiatives. She has extensive experience in working with large national databases, including the National Household Travel Survey, the American Travel Survey, the American Housing Survey, and the American Time Use Survey. She earned a bachelor’s degree in geography and political science from the University of Texas at Austin.

Paul F. Morris is President and CEO of Atlanta BeltLine, Inc., a major sustainable urban renewal project that is developing a network of parks, trails, and transit services supporting more than $20 billion of inner city reinvestment along a former rail corridor circling the downtown of Atlanta, Georgia. Before assuming this position, he was Deputy Secretary of the North Carolina Department of Transportation, where he was responsible for administering the nonhighway modal divisions, including rail, aviation, ferries, ports, and public transportation. In this position, to which he was appointed in 2011, he served as the department’s central point of contact for transportation initiatives involving the North Carolina Railroad and the Ports Authority. He has served as President of Greenleaf Strategies, LLC, and as Executive Vice President and Global Director of Strategic Consulting and Sustainability for Parsons Brinckerhoff, Inc., where he assisted government entities in 25 states and 10 foreign countries with integrated project and policy development initiatives. He was a member of the city of Raleigh’s Passenger Rail Task Force, charged with advising the city council on intercity passenger rail service. He earned a bachelor’s degree from the University of Oregon and undertook graduate studies in planning and development at the Harvard Graduate School of Design.

Christopher A. Nash retired in 2014 as Research Professor in the Institute for Transport Studies, University of Leeds. His research interests are in rail transport, transport pricing, and transport externalities. He has written extensively on rail passenger transportation, including high-speed rail. He had been on the faculty of the University of Leeds since 1975 and previously at the University of Southampton. He has acted as adviser to many bodies, including the European Commission High Level Group on Transport Infrastructure Charging, the European Union Committee of the House of Lords, the Transport Committee of the House of Commons, and the Railways Group of the European Conference of Ministers of Transport. He is a member of the Editorial Board of the

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

Journal of Transport Policy and Economics, the South African Journal of Transportation and Supply Chain Management, the International Journal of Transport Economics, and the International Journal of Green Economics. He earned a PhD in transport economics.

Clinton V. Oster, Jr., is Professor Emeritus and former Associate Dean for Bloomington Programs at the School of Public and Environmental Affairs, Indiana University. His research has centered on aviation safety, airline economics and competition policy, air traffic management, energy policy, and environmental and natural resources policy. He has coauthored five books on various aspects of air transportation, including Deregulation and the Future of Intercity Passenger Travel with John Meyer and Managing the Skies: Public Policy, Organization, and Financing of Air Navigation with John Strong. He has chaired or cochaired several NRC committees, including the Committee for the Study of Traffic Safety Lessons from Benchmark Nations, the Committee on the Federal Employers’ Liability Act, the Committee on the Effects of Commuting on Pilot Fatigue, and the Committee on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s National Aviation Operational Monitoring Service Project. He was a member of the Committee for a Study of Federal Aviation Administration Air Traffic Controller Staffing, the Committee for Guidance on Setting and Enforcing Speed Limits, and the Committee for a Study on Air Passenger Service and Safety Since Deregulation. He holds a bachelor’s degree in engineering from Princeton University, a master’s degree in public affairs from Carnegie Mellon University, and a PhD in economics from Harvard University.

Joseph P. Schwieterman is Director of DePaul University’s Chaddick Institute for Metropolitan Development, which promotes effective urban planning. His research and professional interests are in public policy, transportation, urban planning, geographic information systems, and economics. He has published extensively on the economics of intercity transportation. He recently authored a book on the abandonment of American railroads, When the Railroad Leaves Town, and led student researchers in an analysis of intercity bus usage. The latter research led to the influential paper The Intercity Bus: America’s Fastest Growing Transportation Mode, which was reported in a Chicago Tribune article,

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

“Get on the Bus” (December 24, 2007). He is a long-standing contributor to TRB, having served on the Committee on Aviation Economics and Forecasting. He earned a bachelor’s degree in industrial management from Purdue University, a master’s degree in transportation from Northwestern University, and a PhD in public policy from the University of Chicago.

Katherine F. Turnbull is an Associate Director of the Texas Transportation Institute of the Texas A&M University System, where she heads the System Planning, Policy, and Environment Research Group. In addition, she is a Visiting Assistant Professor in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at Texas A&M University. Her research focuses on transit, transportation planning, travel demand management, and intelligent transportation systems. She is active in TRB and the Institute of Transportation Engineers. She is past chair of TRB’s Planning and Environment Group and served as chair of the High-Occupancy Vehicle Committee for 6 years. She was a member of the TRB Committee for the Evaluation of the Congestion Mitigation and Air Quality Improvement Program and chair of the Steering Committee for the Conference on Travel Demand Management Innovation and Research. She is currently chair of the Institute of Transportation Engineers Transit Council and a member of the ITS America Coordinating Council. She holds a bachelor’s degree from the University of Minnesota, a master’s degree from the University of Wisconsin, and a PhD in urban and regional science from Texas A&M University.

Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×

Interregional Travel

A NEW PERSPECTIVE FOR POLICY MAKING


Transportation Research Board Special Report 320 examines the demand for and supply of interregional transportation in the United States. Major additions to transportation infrastructure, including high-speed rail, are being considered for some of the country ’s most heavily traveled 100- to 500-mile corridors. The availability and use of the automobile, airplane, and train for interregional travel are reviewed, along with the rejuvenated intercity bus. U.S. interregional corridors and transportation options are contrasted with those in Japan and Europe, where substantial investments have been made in passenger rail.

Public investments in new, long-lived transportation infrastructure can be risky because of uncertainty about future demand and the development of new technologies and competing transportation services. Decision makers in interregional corridors face the added challenge of having to coordinate investments across multiple jurisdictions. The report recommends actions to reduce this uncertainty and create stronger institutional means for developing the country ’s interregional corridors.

ALSO OF INTEREST

Travel Demand Forecasting: Parameters and Techniques

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 716, ISBN 978-0-309-21400-1, 160 pages, 8.5 x 11, softcover, 2012, $67.00

A Guidebook for Corridor-Based Statewide Transportation Planning

National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 661, ISBN 978-0-309-15479-6, 68 pages, 8.5 x 11, softcover, 2010, $46.00

Metropolitan Travel Forecasting: Current Practice and Future Direction

TRB Special Report 288, ISBN 0-309-10417-3, 132 pages, 6 x 9, softcover, 2007, $31.00

In Pursuit of Speed: New Options for Intercity Passenger Transport

TRB Special Report 233, ISBN 0-309-05122-3, 179 pages, 6 x 9, softcover, 1991, $22.00

images

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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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Page 182
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
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Page 183
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
Page 183
Page 184
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
Page 184
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
Page 185
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
Page 186
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
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Page 188
Suggested Citation:"Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/21887.
×
Page 188
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 Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making
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TRB Special Report 320: Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making examines the demand for and supply of interregional transportation in the United States. Major additions to transportation infrastructure, including high-speed rail, are being considered for some of the country’s most heavily traveled 100- to 500-mile corridors. The availability and use of the automobile, airplane, and train for interregional travel are reviewed along with the rejuvenated intercity bus. U.S. interregional corridors and transportation options are contrasted with those in Japan and Europe, where substantial investments have been made in passenger rail.

Public investments in new, long-lived transportation infrastructure can be risky because of uncertainty about future demand and the development of new technologies and competing transportation services. Decisionmakers in interregional corridors face the added challenge of having to coordinate investments across multiple jurisdictions. The report recommends actions to reduce this uncertainty and create stronger institutional means for developing the country’s interregional corridors.

TR News 303 features an article on Interregional Travel: A New Perspective for Policy Making.

A video about the research is now available:

At the 2016 TRB Annual Meeting, January 10-14, 2016, a session entitled Interregional Travel: Policymaking from a New Perspective was webcast live. These videos provide an overview of various components of the project.

Introduction:

Part 1: Overview of Project Scope

Part 2: Data and Information Needs

Part 3: Intercity Bus Operations

Question and Answer Session

Presenters:

  • Tom Deen
  • Nancy McGuckin
  • Joe Schweiterman

Moderated by: Martin Wachs

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