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Issues Related to Accommodating Animals Traveling Through Airports (2015)

Chapter: Appendix A - Behavioral Criteria for Asking for Dog to Be Removed from an Airport

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Behavioral Criteria for Asking for Dog to Be Removed from an Airport ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Issues Related to Accommodating Animals Traveling Through Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22120.
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Page 63
Page 64
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Behavioral Criteria for Asking for Dog to Be Removed from an Airport ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2015. Issues Related to Accommodating Animals Traveling Through Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22120.
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Page 64

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

64 This table was adapted from Anything Pawsable [blog], “Things Service Dogs in Public Should and Should Not Do,” Kea Grace, Nov. 1, 2013 [Online]. Available: http://www.anythingpawsable.com/things-service- dogs-public/#.VLZu93sV6So. Note: A service dog may become sick, in which case allowances should be made for otherwise unacceptable behavior. APPENDIX A Behavioral Criteria for Asking for Dog to Be Removed from an Airport Category of Behavior Service Dogs in Public Should NOT Service Dogs in Public Should Be under control or human partner is taking appropriate actions to control Be unfocused on their handler at any time Focus on their handler at all times unless doing trained task work Be anxious, antsy, agitated, or aggressive in any way, shape, form, or fashion Possess a stable, even temperament without anxiety, reactivity or aggression Break “stays,” “unders,” or other fixed-position behaviors to investigate distractions, explore or other move around. Exceptions: Service Dogs who must perform work that requires them to take the initiative to respond to their handler’s disability Remain quietly by their handler’s side when their handler stops without wandering or losing focus Pick food or objects up off the floor or steal food or items that are sitting out. Exceptions to the “picking objects up off the floor” include dogs who retrieve dropped items for their handlers or who are otherwise doing trained task work Ignore food or other objects except when directed by their handler Whine, bark, grumble, growl, or make other noises. An exception may be if the whining is an alert, such as to notify a handler who is experiencing a panic attack or a drop in blood sugar. Be quiet at all times unless performing specific, trained task work. Outside of trained and necessary task work, there should be NO other vocalization, including, whining, grumbling, wooing, barking, growling, whimpering or other noise. Sniff staff members, patrons, floors, tables, counters, surfaces, products, shelving or anything else unless the Service Dog is performing specific, trained task work, such as detecting allergens or other dangerous substances Keep his or her nose to his or her self at all times, even if there are foods, products or other interesting things readily accessible. Sniffing people, objects or food is not acceptable

65 Category of Behavior Service Dogs in Public Should NOT Service Dogs in Public Should Drag or pull their handler for any reason, unless the dog is performing specific mobility-related task work for their handler as evidenced by the presence of a brace mobility support harness, other task-related gear or wheelchair assistance harness. Walk nicely on a leash without pulling, straining, lunging, lagging, circling, or forging Wander or move widely out of heel position unless cued to by their handler. Lay quietly under the table or beside their handler’s chair without getting up or moving around excessively Appear unkempt and not well-taken care of, with excessive shedding or offensive odor Appear professional, well-groomed, and well-taken care for, without excessive shedding or offensive odor Engage with other dogs, people, children or distractions unless allowed to do so by their human partner. The key here is “allowed to do so by their human.” Ignore distractions Jump, scratch, mouth, or exhibit other “out of control” behavior. Respond quickly and readily to the handler’s commands, cues, or directions. Housebroken Urinates or defecates inappropriately Never urinates or defecates inappropriately

Next: Appendix B - Effective Accommodations for Animals Traveling Through Airports »
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 64: Issues Related to Accommodating Animals Traveling Through Airports explores ways for airports to develop a coordinated approach in animal transportation to better accommodate the well-being of animals traveling through airports. The report identifies pertinent regulations; explores issues and ranges of accommodation requirements and strategies to respond to issues; and illustrates effective airport practices to help accommodate animals traveling through airports.

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