National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan (2014)

Chapter: Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials

« Previous: Chapter 3 - Using the Transit Asset Prioritization Tool
Page 65
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 65
Page 66
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 66
Page 67
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 67
Page 68
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 68
Page 69
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 69
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 70
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 71
Page 72
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 72
Page 73
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 73
Page 74
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 74
Page 75
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 75
Page 76
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 76
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 77
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 78
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 79
Page 80
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 80
Page 81
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 81
Page 82
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 82
Page 83
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 83
Page 84
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 84
Page 85
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 85
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 86
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 87
Page 88
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 88
Page 89
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 89
Page 90
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 90
Page 91
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 91
Page 92
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 92
Page 93
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 93
Page 94
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 94
Page 95
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 95
Page 96
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 96
Page 97
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 97
Page 98
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 98
Page 99
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 99
Page 100
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 100
Page 101
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 101
Page 102
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 102
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 103
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 104
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 105
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 106
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 107
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 108
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 109
Page 110
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 110
Page 111
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 111
Page 112
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 112
Page 113
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 113
Page 114
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 114
Page 115
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 115
Page 116
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - TAPT Tutorials." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 116

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

65 Introduction The following chapter includes two, step-by-step tutorials illustrating the use of TAPT using two fictitious transit agencies as examples. They provide users with applications of the tool, and will help transit agency staff see how to apply the tool to their assets. The first tutorial, Main Street Transit (MST), is a small transit agency with a fleet of 39 buses. The agency is in the process of developing a TAMP and the tutorial will show how the agency uses TAPT as a tool for determining their funding needs and developing a prioritized program to incorporate into their TAMP. The second tutorial, Springfield Transit Authority (STA), is a mid-sized agency responsible for managing a variety of assets, including buses, light rail vehicles, track, guideway, admin- istrative and maintenance facilities, and major systems for their building facilities, including roof and heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC). STA, as a relatively new agency, has histori- cally had relatively modest rehabilitation and replacement needs, and has handled these on an as-needed basis. As the average age of their assets increases, the agency is looking for long-term solutions to maintain a SGR and is using TAPT to determine ways of prioritizing their funding to maintain SGR. Main Street Transit MST was established in 1996 as a transit agency providing bus service to a small urban area. The transit agency maintains five major bus routes, connecting the local downtown to the rest of the region, and a demand response fleet. The MST bus fleet is made up of three vehicle types: • HB Buses—10 hybrid buses, maintained in three subfleets; • DB Buses—24 diesel buses, maintained in six subfleets; and • DR Buses—5 vans for demand response service, maintained individually. MST is embarking on creating their first TAMP, to be completed in 2015. As the staff member responsible for compiling the TAMP, you have been in touch with peer agencies, which have suggested TAPT as an easy and straightforward tool that can simplify the process of creating a TAMP. For the final document, you have decided to provide a 10-year program for replacing vehicle assets that would maintain the fleet in a SGR. To help compile your TAMP, read Chap- ter 2: Steps in Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan, and decide to follow the TAMP Development process outlined in this chapter. C H A P T E R 4 TAPT Tutorials

66 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Before entering data, first review the software guidance. Based on the information pro- vided, develop a list of the data that will be required to effectively use the tool. To complete the required NTD inputs for the vehicle model, work with MST staff to compile the following forms: • Service form S-10 • Identification form B-10 • Operating Expense form F-30 • Federal Funding Allocation Statistics form FFA-10 • Source of Funds form F-10 • Maintenance Performance form R-20 • Energy Consumption form R-30 • Uses of Capital form F-20 • Employees form R-10 At the same time, also make note of other input fields that are relevant to the agency and con- tact MST staff members to provide any necessary historical or agency-specific data. Step 1: Create Vehicle Models and Define Parameters The first step in the TAMP development process is to Inventory Assets and Data. In the pro- cess of collecting data inputs for TAPT, you will begin to compile some of the inventory data needed to develop a capital asset inventory for all vehicle assets. Budgets and Parameters 1. From the start screen, click Budgets & Parameters (Figure 4.1). 2. Using Table 4.1, adjust the following parameters (Figure 4.2): • The First Budget Year is adjusted to reflect the first budget year that will be included in the TAMP. • The Discount Rate is changed to reflect MST policy. • The Agency Cost per Gallon of Fuel is adjusted to account for MST historical fuel costs, which have typically been higher than the default. 3. Select Click for Main Menu to return to the start screen. Hybrid Buses Before developing the TAMP for MST, you spoke with leadership in the agency and deter- mined that the document will focus on the current state of vehicle assets. For this reason, you chose to use only the vehicle model in TAPT. Using the tool, you will model each of the three bus fleets separately, starting with hybrid buses. 4. From the start screen, click Create Asset Group (Figure 4.3). 5. Name the Asset Group ID Code “Hybrid” and specify that the asset group will be using the “Vehicle Model,” before selecting Create New Group. In the Hybrid vehicle model, perform the following steps (Figure 4.4): 6. Set the Vehicle Type to “Bus.” 7. In the Asset Description text field, name the assets “Hybrid.” 8. Use Table 4.2 to input the Inventory Description data for the hybrid bus fleet.

TAPT Tutorials 67 Figure 4.1. TAPT Start Screen. Parameters Value First Budget Year 2016 Discount Rate 5.0% Agency Cost per Gallon of Fuel ($) 3.10 Table 4.1. Budgets and Parameters. Figure 4.2. Budgets and Parameters.

68 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Figure 4.3. Create an Asset Group. Figure 4.4. Hybrid Bus Vehicle Model.

TAPT Tutorials 69 The next steps require entering NTD data for Hybrid buses. The data that MST currently reports to NTD combines statistics for hybrid and diesel buses; therefore, you must disaggregate the data for the two fleets before continuing. The data in Table 4.3 reflects the disaggregated figures calculated for Hybrid buses. 9. Use Table 4.3 to input the Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database for the hybrid bus fleet (Figure 4.5). After completing the NTD data, you review the TAPT inputs to determine other factors that are relevant to the agency and might improve the results of the analysis. A complete list of the data inputs for the vehicle model can be found in Appendix A of the draft final report. Since MST has limited historical data, you decide to use the defaults for the remaining inputs. This decision includes using the default for the New Vehicle Cost, $495,951. Before moving on: 10. Review the Summary Results, shown in Figure 4.6. Note that the calculated Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age for hybrid buses is determined to be 14 years (or 588,000 miles) with an Annual Cost of $184,326. 11. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Model Parameters Value Passenger Miles (000) 2,400 Unlinked Trips (000) 700 Vehicle Miles (000) 420 Revenue Vehicle Miles (000) 325 Revenue Vehicle Hours (000) 25 Number of Road Calls 70 Gallons of Fuel for Vehicle Operations (000) 110 Vehicle Maintenance Cost (000) 640 Table 4.3. Hybrid Bus Model Parameters. Average Accumulated Mileage Number of Vehicles Project Code 72,400 2 HB01-2012 139,600 1 HB02-2011 320,300 5 HB03-2006 504,000 2 HB04-2002 Table 4.2. Hybrid Bus Inventory Description. Figure 4.5. Hybrid Bus Vehicle Model Parameters.

70 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Diesel Buses The next step is to enter the data for the diesel bus fleet by creating a second Vehicle Model. 12. Create a new asset category for diesel buses uses the following information (Figure 4.7): • Asset Group ID Code: Diesel • Model Type: Vehicle Model 13. Input the following information into the diesel vehicle model: • Vehicle Type: Bus • Asset Description: Diesel • Inventory Description: Use the inputs from Table 4.4 • Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database (Figure 4.8): Use the inputs from Table 4.5 Figure 4.7. Diesel Bus Vehicle Model. Average Accumulated Mileage Number of Vehicles Project Code 203,700 3 DB01-2010 475,500 5 DB02-2005 519,000 2 DB03-2002 625,400 4 DB04-1999 650,800 6 DB05-1998 701,200 4 DB06-1996 Table 4.4. Diesel Bus Inventory Description. Figure 4.6. Hybrid Bus Vehicle Summary Results.

TAPT Tutorials 71 Figure 4.8. Diesel Bus Vehicle Model Parameters. Model Parameters Value Passenger Miles (000) 4,200 Unlinked Trips (000) 1,540 Vehicle Miles (000) 1,110 Revenue Vehicle Miles (000) 980 Revenue Vehicle Hours (000) 60 Number of Road Calls 225 Gallons of Fuel for Vehicle Operations (000) 340 Vehicle Maintenance Cost (000) 1,380 Table 4.5. Diesel Bus Model Parameters. Figure 4.9. Diesel Bus Vehicle Model Summary Results. After reviewing the remaining inputs for the vehicle model, you also choose to modify the New Vehicle Cost for diesel buses. After speaking with MST staff, you determine diesel buses typically cost less than hybrid buses. 14. Override the New Vehicle Cost ($) for diesel buses by inputting “446,400.” 15. Review the Summary Results, shown at the bottom of Figure 4.9. Note that the calcu- lated Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age for diesel buses is determined to be 14 years (or 647,500 miles) with an Annual Cost of $160,589. Select Click for Main Menu when complete.

72 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Demand Response Vans The last model that you create is a Vehicle Model for the Demand Response fleet. 16. Create a new asset category for diesel buses using the following information: • Asset Group ID Code: DR • Model Type: Vehicle Model 17. Input the following information into the demand response vehicle model (Figure 4.10): • Vehicle Type: Van • Asset Description: Demand Response • Inventory Description: Use the inputs from Table 4.6 • Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database (Figure 4.11): Use the inputs from Table 4.7 18. Review the Summary Results, shown in Figure 4.12. Note that the calculated Cost- Minimizing Replacement Age for demand response vans is determined to be 13 years (or 104,000 miles) with an Annual Cost of $10,250. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Step 2: Run the Prioritization Model Before running a scenario with the agency budget, it is important to understand how the agency’s assets are deteriorating or improving over time. Running the prioritization model with an unconstrained budget allows the agency to gain a better understanding of the model’s recommendations. Figure 4.10. Demand Response Van Vehicle Model. Average Accumulated Mileage Number of Vehicles Project Code 39,200 1 DR01-2008 60,100 1 DR02-2006 84,400 1 DR03-2004 100,300 1 DR04-2001 132,900 1 DR05-1997 Table 4.6. DR Van Inventory Description.

TAPT Tutorials 73 Unconstrained Scenario After all of the vehicle data has been entered, you are ready to begin running the model to determine the program for MST. The first step is to run an unconstrained program. 1. From the start screen, click Budgets & Parameters (Figure 4.13). 2. Set the Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation ($) to “999,999,999” for years 2016 through 2025 to cover the span of the 10-year plan in the TAMP. 3. Select Click for Main Menu to return to the start screen. The next step is to run the model using the unconstrained budget. 4. Select Run Prioritization Model and define the ID Code as “Unconstrained” to describe the run. Then click OK to run the model (Figure 4.14). When the analysis has been completed, the model will open a Program List for the Uncon- strained run, shown in Figure 4.15. 5. Review the Program List and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. Note that with an unconstrained budget the following assets would be replaced between 2016 and 2025: • 7 hybrid buses • 24 diesel buses • 5 demand response buses Figure 4.11. Demand Response Van Vehicle Model Parameters. Model Parameters Value Passenger Miles (000) 25 Unlinked Trips (000) 5 Vehicle Miles (000) 40 Revenue Vehicle Miles (000) 35 Revenue Vehicle Hours (000) 5 Number of Road Calls 20 Gallons of Fuel for Vehicle Operations (000) 5 Vehicle Maintenance Cost (000) 20 Table 4.7. DR Van Model Parameters. Figure 4.12. Demand Response Van Summary Results.

74 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Click Display Summary Table and select the “Unconstrained” run before clicking Display Summary Table (Figure 4.16). The unconstrained budget is used to show MST all of the economically feasible tasks that would be eligible for programming during the analysis period. On the Summary Table page, shown in Figure 4.17, you note with an unconstrained budget the mean distance between fail- ures would increase, improving service and the overall condition of the fleet. With an uncon- strained budget, MST would spend $14,379,040 over the 10-year span in the TAMP. Table 4.8 shows a summary of the initial needs and condition of assets, compared to the value in 2025 if the agency had unconstrained funding over 10 years. 6. Review the Summary Table and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. 7. From the start screen, select Display Chart–One Run (Figure 4.18). 8. Select “Needs ($)” as the Prioritization Model Output Variable to chart, then select “Unconstrained” as the Run to chart before clicking Display Chart. 9. Review the Needs ($) chart, shown in Figure 4.19, and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. 10. Create a second chart using “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” as the Prioritization Model Output Variable to chart. This graph is shown in Figure 4.20. After reviewing the graph, select Click for Main Menu to return to the start screen. Figures 4.19 and 4.20 show the distribution of Needs ($) and the Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) between 2016 and 2025 in an unconstrained scenario. These figures will serve as a point of comparison to the final prioritization run using the agency budget. Figure 4.13. Budgets and Parameters for an Unconstrained Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 75 Figure 4.14. Run Prioritization Model. Figure 4.15. Unconstrained Scenario Program List.

76 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Figure 4.16. Display Summary Table. Figure 4.17. Unconstrained Scenario Summary Results.

TAPT Tutorials 77 Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2025 Unconstrained Remaining Backlog $ 6,327,112 $ 0 Cumulative Spent - $ 14,379,040 MDBF (miles) 4,300 5,995 Passenger Delay (hours) 5,303 3,964 CO2 Emissions (tons) 5,215 4,963 Other Agency Costs $ 3,208,014 $ 2,789,694 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 5,043,302 $ 5,764,194 Table 4.8. Unconstrained Summary Results. Figure 4.18. Display Chart—One Run.

78 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Do Nothing Scenario Next, create a scenario for MST with no budget to understand how assets would deteriorate if no funding was available. 11. Adjust the following on the Budgets and Parameters page: • Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation (Years 2016–2025): 0 12. Run a prioritization model with the ID Code “Do Nothing.” 13. Review the Program List and the Summary Table, shown in Figure 4.21. Table 4.9 summarizes the results of the do nothing scenario. The table shows a significant decrease in mean distance between failures (see Figure 4.22), an increase in passenger hours of delay, and the large costs that would be incurred if the system were allowed to deteriorate. Figure 4.19. MST Needs ($) Unconstrained Scenario. Figure 4.20. MST Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Unconstrained Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 79 Figure 4.21. Do Nothing Scenario Summary Results. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2025 Unconstrained Do Nothing Remaining Backlog $ 6,327,112 $ 0 $ 14,379,040 Cumulative Spent - $ 14,379,040 - MDBF (miles) 4,300 5,995 1,830 Passenger Delay (hours) 5,303 3,964 11,921 CO2 Emissions (tons) 5,215 4,963 6,717 Other Agency Costs $ 3,208,014 $ 2,789,694 $ 4,878,120 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 5,043,302 $ 4,475,883 $ 7,489,154 Table 4.9. Do Nothing Summary Results. Figure 4.22. MST Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Do Nothing Scenario.

80 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan 14. Input the following information to create two charts, showing conditions between 2016 and 2025 in a “Do Nothing” scenario: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.23, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Needs ($)” the Run “Do Nothing.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 2.22, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” and the Run “Do Nothing.” Step 3: Incorporate the Constrained Budget The third step of the TAMP Development Process, Define Investment Scenarios, involves applying a constrained budget and prioritizing project selection. In this section, you will input MST’s annual budget and run a scenario to determine a prioritized program in TAPT. Annual Budget Scenario For the last run, you input the MST budget into the model. 1. Adjust the following on the Budgets and Parameters page: • Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation (Years 2016–2025): 825,000 2. Run a prioritization model with the ID Code “Annual Budget.” 3. Review the Program List and the Summary Table, shown in Figure 4.24. First you review the proposed program with MST leadership and staff. In total, the suggested program, using the annual budget, replaces: • 2 hybrid buses; • 14 diesel buses; and • 4 demand response vehicles. The program list suggests the following replacement actions between 2016 and 2025: • Demand response vehicle 4 is replaced in 2016 • Demand response vehicle 5 is replaced in 2016 • Diesel bus fleet 6, containing 4 vehicles, is replaced in 2018 Figure 4.23. MST Needs ($) Do Nothing Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 81 • Demand response vehicle 3 is replaced in 2019 • Diesel bus fleet 4, containing 4 vehicles, is replaced in 2023 • Diesel bus fleet 5, containing 6 vehicles, is replaced in 2023 • Demand response vehicle 2 is replaced in 2024 • Hybrid bus fleet 4, containing 2 vehicles, is replaced in 2024 Summary Results for this scenario, as compared to previous scenarios, are shown in Table 4.10. In addition to reviewing the summary results, you also create a series of graphs to show the effects of the program over time. 4. Input the following information to create two charts: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.25, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Needs ($)” the Run “Annual Budget.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.26, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” and the Run “Annual Budget.” The annual budget prioritization run and the results showed that over a 10-year period, Main Street Transit was able to maintain their vehicle assets without significantly increasing their needs (see Figure 4.25), only increasing the overall agency needs by $655,401. Meanwhile there was a Figure 4.24. Annual Budget Scenario Program List. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2025 Unconstrained Annual Budget Scenario Do Nothing Remaining Backlog $ 6,327,112 - $ 6,982,513 $ 14,379,040 Cumulative Spent - $ 14,379,040 $ 7,396,527 - MDBF (miles) 4,300 5,995 4,088 1,830 Passenger Delay (hours) 5,303 3,964 5,874 11,921 CO2 Emissions (tons) 5,215 4,963 5,133 6,717 Other Agency Costs $ 3,208,014 $ 2,789,694 $ 3,238,596 $ 4,878,120 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 5,043,302 $ 4,475,883 $ 5,076,463 $ 7,489,154 Table 4.10. Annual Budget Results.

82 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan not a noticeable decrease in the MDBFs (see Figure 4.26), as the average MDBF only decreased by approximately 200 miles. Upon reviewing the results with MST staff, you determine that the program is not consistent with agency priorities. In the process of developing the agency TAMP, MST had determined that replacing diesel buses was a priority because (1) they are required for maintaining regular service, (2) they have more mileage than other vehicles owned by the agency, and (3) MST is committed to purchasing hybrid buses in the future for environmental reasons. With these considerations in mind, you return to the model to make adjustments. Step 4: Refine the Prioritization Approach The fourth step in the TAMP development process is to Finalize Investment Scenarios. Developing a program list is an iterative process that involves adjusting the parameters of the analysis until the agency arrives at a program that best reflects their needs. In this section, Figure 4.25. Needs ($) Annual Budget Scenario. Figure 4.26. Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Annual Budget Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 83 you will be responsible for adjusting the investment scenarios to arrive at an optimized plan for MST. Adjusted Program Scenario After determining that replacing diesel buses is an agency priority, you return to the vehicle model for diesel buses. 1. From the start screen, click Edit Asset Group and select “Diesel.” 2. Using Table 4.11, adjust the following Other Parameters (Figure 4.27): • The Energy Savings for a New Vehicle quantifies the increased energy efficiency of the hybrid vehicles that will replace the diesel fleet. • The Supplemental Replacement Benefit approximates the additional benefits of a shift to hybrid technology not reflected in the TAPT models. 3. Delete the New Vehicle Cost to use the default for this value (Figure 4.28). Because diesel buses will be replaced with hybrid buses, the New Vehicle Cost should be the cost of pur- chasing a new hybrid vehicle. 4. Review the Summary Results. Note that the calculated Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age for diesel buses has increased to 15 years (or 693,750 miles) with a decreased Annual Cost of $157,854. 5. Return to the start screen and select Run Prioritization Model, defining the ID Code as “Adjusted Program” to describe the run. The annual budget should not be adjusted for this scenario. Model Parameters Value Energy Saving for a New Vehicle (%) 25.0% Supplemental Replacement Benefit (% of repl. cost) 5.0% Table 4.11. Adjustments to Other Parameters. Figure 4.27. Adjustments to Other Parameters. Figure 4.28. Adjustments to the Additional Vehicle Data.

84 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Table 4.12 shows the results of the adjusted program scenario compared to the annual budget scenario. 6. Review the Program List and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. Note that with the adjusted program scenario the following assets would be replaced between 2016 and 2025 (Figure 4.29): • 16 diesel buses • 4 demand response vehicles Before choosing the adjusted program scenario, you decide to compare the summary results to the annual budget scenario. 7. From the start screen, select Display Chart–Two Runs. 8. Select “Needs ($)” as the Prioritization Model Output Variable to chart, then select “Annual Budget” and “Adjusted Program” as the Runs to chart before clicking Display Chart. 9. Review the Needs ($) chart, shown in Figure 4.30, and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2025 Annual Budget Scenario Adjusted Program Scenario Remaining Backlog $ 6,327,112 $ 6,982,513 $ 7,478,028 Cumulative Spent - $ 7,396,527 $ 8,090,247 MDBF (miles) 4,300 4,088 3,597 Passenger Delay (hours) 5,303 5,874 6,650 CO2 Emissions (tons) 5,215 5,133 5,034 Other Agency Costs $ 3,208,014 $ 3,238,596 $ 3,547,419 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 5,043,302 $ 5,076,463 $ 5,348,089 Table 4.12. Annual Budget and Adjusted Program Results. Figure 4.29. Adjusted Program Scenario Program List.

TAPT Tutorials 85 10. Input the following information to create two additional charts: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.31, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” the Runs “Annual Budget” and “Adjusted Program.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.32, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Tons of CO2” and the Runs “Annual Budget” and “Adjusted Program.” These graphs show that using the Adjusted Program scenario, MST can reduce the tons of CO2 used by the fleet. In the 10-year period, the CO2 will decrease by 19%, almost 2% more than if the Annual Budget scenario was used. Although this scenario also increases the agency needs by almost $1.5 million, and will cause a slight decrease in the MDBFs, the agency 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Figure 4.30. Comparing Needs ($) between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and Adjusted Program Scenario (black). 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Figure 4.31. Comparing Mean Distance between Failures (miles) between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and Adjusted Program Scenario (black).

86 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan believes that maintaining a hybrid fleet will have long-term benefits, both to the agency and to the environment. When the analysis has been completed, you bring the results to the agency executives, who approve the Adjusted Program scenario for the TAMP. Step 5: Prepare Data for the Asset Management Plan Now that you have the results of the TAPT analysis, you are ready to incorporate the data into the MST TAMP. After returning to Chapter 2 to review the TAMP development process, you develop a plan documenting the current conditions of the MST fleet, and recommended priori- ties for the future, as reflected in Table 4.12 and Figures 4.30 to 4.32. The final program list suggests the following replacement actions between 2016 and 2025: • Demand response vehicle 5 is replaced in 2016 • Diesel bus fleet 6, containing 4 vehicles, is replaced in 2018 • Demand response vehicle 4 is replaced in 2019 • Diesel bus fleet 4, containing 4 vehicles, is replaced in 2020 • Demand response vehicle 3 is replaced in 2022 • Diesel bus fleet 5, containing 6 vehicles, is replaced in 2024 • Demand response vehicle 2 is replaced in 2025 • Diesel bus fleet 3, containing 2 vehicles, is replaced in 2025 Springfield Transit Authority Springfield Transit Authority (STA) provides transit service to the City of Springfield, USA. The agency was established in 1977. Initially STA provided bus service exclusively. In 1993, STA opened its first light rail line, the Central Line (CL), to meet the area’s growing transit needs. Since then, three more light rail lines have been built: the North Line (NL) com- pleted in 1999, the Airport Link (AL) completed in 2005, and the West Line (WL) completed in 2012. 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 2021 2022 2023 2024 2025 Figure 4.32. Comparing Tons of CO2 between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and Adjusted Program Scenario (black).

TAPT Tutorials 87 At present STA has a fleet of 270 buses. The majority of the fleet was purchased in 2000 with a federal grant, but the agency recognizes that these buses will soon need to be replaced. Also, the agency has a fleet of 96 light rail vehicles. The light rail system includes 475,233 linear feet of track and 241,163 linear feet of guideway (much of which is double-tracked). The agency also maintains 30 buildings, including maintenance and administrative facilities. These buildings are split into three complexes: the West Corridor, Southeast Corridor, and North Corridor. With the growing transit needs and the opening of the West Line, improvements are being planned for the North Corridor Maintenance Facilities, including a Safety and Training Facility, which was completed in the previous year, and a complete overhaul of the Fuel and Wash Building, planned for 2018. 2013 marked the 20th anniversary of the opening of the Central Line and STA recognizes that the light rail infrastructure will soon need to be updated. Also, the majority of the bus fleet is also nearing the end of its useful life. Faced with an aging system and a number of important projects that will need to occur during a short time frame, STA downloaded TAPT to help them better understand their upcoming needs and determine an optimized program. As the Asset Manager for Springfield Transit, you have been tasked with using TAPT to ana- lyze capital rehabilitation and replacement needs. After reviewing the guidance and collecting the necessary data for the tool inputs, you begin by grouping assets to determine the best method for modeling in a multi-asset analysis. This means grouping like assets that can 1) be used in the same model type, and therefore have the same basic data available, and 2) have similar deteriora- tion rates and therefore can be defined as the same asset type. To analyze the assets, you choose to create separate models for the following assets: • Buses • Light Rail Vehicles • Track – Grade Crossing and Embedded (XC/Embedded) – Tangent Ballasted – Curved Ballasted – Special • Guideway – XC/Embedded – Ballasted • Facilities – Maintenance Facilities – Administrative Facilities – Roof – HVAC Budgets and Parameters 1. From the start screen, click Budgets & Parameters (Figure 4.33). 2. Using Table 4.13, adjust the following parameters: • The First Budget Year is adjusted to 2013, since the most recent agency inspections were performed in 2012. • The Discount Rate is adjusted to reflect STA policy. • The Agency Cost per Gallon of Fuel and Agency Cost per Kilowatt Hour are adjusted based on Springfield Transit historical data, modified to account for inflation. These costs tend to be slightly lower than the default values.

88 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Bus For buses, you consult STA staff and together choose to use the defaults for the majority of inputs. Beyond NTD data and cost histories, the agency has limited historical data that could be used to override the model defaults. STA has collected detailed cost data for recently purchased assets, therefore you update the New Vehicle Cost using an estimate based on this information. 3. On the Start Screen, select Create Asset Group (Figure 4.34). 4. Name the Asset Group ID Code “Bus” and for the model type select “Vehicle Model,” before selecting Create New Group. 5. Select the Vehicle Type to “Bus.” 6. In the Asset Description text field, name the assets “Bus” (Figure 4.35). 7. Using the data from Table 4.14, input the Inventory Description data (Figure 4.36). Figure 4.33. Budget and Parameters. Parameters Value First Budget Year 2013 Discount Rate 5.0% Agency Cost per Gallon of Fuel ($) 2.75 Agency Cost per Kilowatt Hour ($) 0.15 Table 4.13. Budgets and Parameters.

TAPT Tutorials 89 Figure 4.34. Create Asset Group. Figure 4.35. Bus Vehicle Model.

90 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Figure 4.36. Bus Vehicle Model Inventory Description. Accumulated Mileage Number of Vehicles Project Code 494,700 100 Bus01 473,900 100 Bus02 295,400 42 Bus03 171,100 4 Bus04 249,600 7 Bus05 170,200 6 Bus06 115,500 5 Bus07 84,000 6 Bus08 Table 4.14. Bus Inventory Data. 8. Using the data from Table 4.15, input the Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database and Additional Vehicle Data (Figure 4.37). 9. Review the Summary Results and note that the Average Annual Cost is $142,785 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Mileage is 663,704 (or 14 years). Select Click for Main Menu when complete (Figure 4.38). Light Rail To develop the light rail, you use the vehicle model and recent NTD data. The override value provided for the New Vehicle Cost is based on the most recent light rail vehicle purchase. You also make additional adjustments to the model to account for the new West Line. This includes increasing the Annual Miles per Vehicle, the default for which is based on the accumulated mileage for the current fleet but does not account for the additional mileage required for the new line. You also increase the Typical Failure Recovery Time to account for the additional delay to subsequent operations when a light rail vehicle is disabled. 10. Create a new asset category for light rail: • Asset Group ID Code: Light Rail • Model Type: Vehicle Model 11. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Light Rail • Asset Description: Light Rail • Inventory Description: Use the inputs from Table 4.16 (Figure 4.39) • Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database: Use the inputs from Table 4.17 (Figure 4.40) • Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.18 (Figure 4.41)

TAPT Tutorials 91 Vehicle Data from the National Transit Database Value Passenger Miles 116,800 Unlinked Trips 18,900 Vehicle Miles 12,800 Revenue Vehicle Miles 9,900 Revenue Vehicle Hours 850 Number of Road Calls 320 Gallons of Fuel for Vehicle Operations 2,600 Vehicle Maintenance Cost 15,700 Additional Vehicle Data Value New Vehicle Cost ($) 384,000 Table 4.15. Bus Model Parameters. Figure 4.37. Bus Vehicle Model Parameters. Figure 4.38. Bus Vehicle Model Summary Results.

92 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Accumulated Mileage Number of Vehicles Project Code 1,143,000 6 LightRail01 992,800 8 LightRail02 768,900 7 LightRail03 439,400 15 LightRail04 414,200 10 LightRail05 289,200 12 LightRail06 117,600 20 LightRail07 24,800 18 LightRail08 Table 4.16. Light Rail Inventory Inputs. Figure 4.39. Light Rail Vehicle Model Inventory Inputs. Model Parameters Value Passenger Miles 329,000 Unlinked Trips 41,300 Vehicle Miles 6,700 Revenue Vehicle Miles 4,800 Revenue Vehicle Hours 250 Number of Road Calls 210 Kilowatt Hours for Vehicle Operations 100,400 Vehicle Maintenance Cost 22,200 Table 4.17. Light Rail Model Parameters. Figure 4.40. Light Rail Vehicle Model Parameters.

TAPT Tutorials 93 To increase the expected lifecycle of light rail assets, STA has decided to perform midlife over- hauls on the cars. To incorporate rehabilitation into the model, you set the cost of rehabilitating a vehicle to reflect what the agency is currently paying for rehab actions. 12. Input Periodic Rehabilitation Costs based on the values in Table 4.19 (Figure 4.42). • The Percent of Vehicle Replacement Cost is based on past vehicle rehab actions that have cost the agency $400,000. The input is based on the percent of the current replacement cost. • The Rehab Interval defines the number of miles traveled before a rehab action is performed. • Convert to per Mile Rehabilitation Cost is set to allow the agency to pay the cost of rehab actions over time, rather than as a lump sum. Additional Vehicle Data Value New Vehicle Cost ($ per vehicle) 4,500,000 Annual Miles per Vehicle 73,000 Inputs for the Delay Calculation Value Typical Roadcall/Failure Recovery Time (minutes) 120 Table 4.18. Light Rail Additional Model Parameter Inputs. Figure 4.41. Light Rail Vehicle Model Additional Parameter Inputs. Rehabilitation Costs Value Percent of Vehicle Replacement Cost 8.9% Rehab Interval (miles) 1,000,000 Convert to per Mile Rehabilitation Cost TRUE Table 4.19. Light Rail Rehabilitation Costs. Figure 4.42. Light Rail Rehabilitation Cost Inputs.

94 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan 13. Review the Summary Results and note that the Average Annual Cost is $921,034 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Mileage is 1,606,000 (or 22 years). Select Click for Main Menu when complete (Figure 4.43). Track Since STA does not collect condition data for all track assets, you choose to model track using the age-based model. STA currently has a maintenance contract for track that has historically resulted in lower costs for maintenance and replacement activities. In developing the track mod- els, you assume that the Agency Failure Costs and Other Passenger Failure Costs are both set to 150% of the Agency Replacement Cost. Meanwhile, the Annual Maintenance Cost is set to 1% of Agency Replacement Cost. Since the majority of the track is relatively new, you decide that there is not enough replacement cost data to determine an override value for the Agency Replacement Cost defaults. Four types of track are modeled separately: tangent ballasted, tan- gent curved, special track, and embedded and grade crossing. Tangent Ballasted Track To create the Tangent Ballasted Track model, perform the following steps: 14. On the Start Screen, select Create Asset Group. 15. Name the Asset Group ID Code “Track (Tangent Ballasted)” and specify that the asset group will use the Age-Based Model. Then select Create New Group. 16. In the Tangent Ballasted Track model, define the Asset Type as “Guideway-Tangent Bal- lasted Track” using the dropdown menu. 17. Write in “Track (Tangent Ballasted)” for the Asset Description. 18. Enter “lineal feet” for Asset Units of Measure. 19. Use Table 4.20 to input the Inventory Description and Additional Parameters data for tangent ballasted track. 20. Review the Summary Results, shown at the bottom of Figure 4.44, to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $54.99 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 33 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Figure 4.43. Light Rail Summary Results. Inventory Description Failure Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 11,000 TrackBL01 Agency Costs ($) 959 14 128,200 TrackBL02 Other Passenger Costs ($) 959 8 69,100 TrackBL03 1 68,250 TrackBL04 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 6.39 Table 4.20. Track (Tangent Ballasted) Model Inputs.

TAPT Tutorials 95 Curved Track 21. Create a new asset category for tangent curved track: • Asset Group ID Code: Track (Curved) • Model Type: Age-Based Model 22. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Guideway-Curved Ballasted Track • Asset Description: Track (Curved) • Asset Units of Measure: lineal feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.21 Figure 4.44. Track (Tangent Ballasted) Age-Based Model.

96 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan 23. Review the Summary Results to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $89.11 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 27 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Special Track 24. Create a new asset category for special track: • Asset Group ID Code: Track (Special) • Model Type: Age-Based Model 25. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Guideway-Special Trackwork • Asset Description: Track (Special) • Asset Units of Measure: lineal feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.22 26. Review the Summary Results to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $361.07 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 28 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Embedded and Grade Crossing Track 27. Create a new asset category for embedded and grade crossing track: • Asset Group ID Code: Track (Embedded and XC) • Model Type: Age-Based Model 28. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Guideway-Curved Embedded Track • Asset Description: Track (Embedded and XC) Inventory Description Failure Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 15,000 TrackCR01 Agency Costs ($) 1,386 14 24,800 TrackCR02 Other Passenger Costs ($) 1,386 8 73,050 TrackCR03 1 35,400 TrackCR04 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 9.24 Table 4.21. Track (Curved) Model Inputs. Inventory Description Failure Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 2,100 TrackSP01 Agency Costs ($) 5,664 14 2,750 TrackSP02 Other Passenger Costs ($) 5,664 8 950 TrackSP03 1 2,100 TrackSP04 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 37.76 Table 4.22. Track (Special) Model Inputs.

TAPT Tutorials 97 • Asset Units of Measure: lineal feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.23 29. Review the Summary Results to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $88.35 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 23 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Guideway For guideway assets (in this case all of the assets in the guideway except track), you decide to use a similar method to track assets, concentrating on providing override values for Agency Costs ($), Other Passenger Costs ($), and Maintenance ($/year). Some of the replacement costs were also updated to better reflect asset types. The model parameters are listed below. Embedded and Grade Crossing Guideway 30. Create a new asset category for embedded and grade crossing guideway: • Asset Group ID Code: Guideway (Embedded and XC) • Model Type: Age-Based Model 31. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Guideway-Grade Crossing • Asset Description: Guideway (Embedded and XC) • Asset Units of Measure: lineal feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.24 Inventory Description Asset Replacement Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 24,250 TrackXC01 Agency Replacement Cost ($) 820 14 1,700 TrackXC02 8 1,500 TrackXC03 Failure Costs 1 4,900 TrackXC04 Input Field Value Agency Costs ($) 1,230 Other Passenger Costs ($) 1,230 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 8.20 Table 4.23. Track (Embedded and XC) Inventory Inputs. Inventory Description Failure Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 12,100 GuideXC01 Agency Costs ($) 4,721 14 1,000 GuideXC02 Other Passenger Costs ($) 4,721 8 750 GuideXC03 1 2,500 GuideXC04 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 31.41 Table 4.24. Guideway (Embedded and XC) Inventory Inputs.

98 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan 32. Review the Summary Results to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $447.58 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 14 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Ballasted Guideway 33. Create a new asset category for ballasted guideway: • Asset Group ID Code: Guideway (Ballasted) • Model Type: Age-Based Model 34. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Guideway-At Grade Ballasted or Expressway • Asset Description: Guideway (Ballasted) • Asset Units of Measure: lineal feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.25 35. Review the Summary Results to ensure that the Average Annual Cost is $175.41 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 72 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Facilities STA maintains two facility types: maintenance facilities and administrative facilities. To reflect the varying cost of replacing these two building types, you create a separate model for each of these asset types, both using the Age-Based Model. For both facility types, square feet of floor area are used as the unit of measurement. Maintenance Facilities 36. On the Start Screen, select Create Asset Group. 37. Name the Asset Group ID Code “Maint Facilities” and for the model type select Age-Based Model, before selecting Create New Group. 38. Select the Asset Type to “Facilities-Maintenance Building.” 39. In the Asset Description text field, name the assets “Maintenance Facilities.” 40. In the Asset Units of Measure text field enter “square feet.” 41. Using the data from Table 4.26, input the Inventory Description data. When reviewing the model inputs, you choose to adjust the following parameters: 42. Using the data from Table 4.27, input the Additional Parameters. • The default value for Agency Replacement Cost in the model is set to reflect the cost of replacing an entire building. To account for the units you chose to use for buildings, Inventory Description Agency Replacement Costs Age of Assets Units of Assets Project Code Input Field Value 20 14,200 GuideBL01 Agency Replacement Cost ($) 2,500 14 83,000 GuideBL02 8 72,700 GuideBL03 Failure Costs 1 54,800 GuideBL04 Input Field Value Agency Costs ($) 3,750 Other Passenger Costs ($) 3,750 Annual Costs Input Field Value Maintenance Cost ($/year) 25.00 Table 4.25. Guideway (Ballasted) Inventory Inputs.

TAPT Tutorials 99 square feet, you adjust the replacement costs to reflect the cost of replacing a square foot of building. • You adjust the Maintenance Annual Costs to reflect the units used in the model and his- torical maintenance costs. The value was calculated as 2% of the agency replacement cost. 43. Review the Summary Results (Figure 4.45) and note that the Average Annual Cost is $110.91 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 41 years. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Administrative Facilities 44. Create a new asset category for administrative facilities: • Asset Group ID Code: Admin Facilities • Model Type: Age-Based Model 45. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Facilities-Administrative Building • Asset Description: Administrative Facilities • Asset Units of Measure: square feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.28 46. Review the Summary Results and note that the Average Annual Cost is $38.46 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 68 years (Figure 4.46). Select Click for Main Menu when complete. HVAC You also decide to use the age-based model for HVAC assets, since the age of installation is readily available and not all units have been inspected. In order to standardize the units of HVAC, you decide to use the square footage of floor area of the building that the HVAC services as the unit of measure. Therefore, you scale the default value for agency replacement cost to reflect the cost of replacing a square foot of HVAC. 47. Create a new asset category for HVAC: • Asset Group ID Code: HVAC • Model Type: Age-Based Model Age Units (sq ft) Description Pipeline Year 22 3,600 Maint01 23 3,750 Maint02 23 33,200 Maint03 27 5,300 Maint04 24 18,500 Maint05 27 4,800 Maint06 27 41,400 Maint07 5 6,200 Maint08 30 150 Maint09 16 45,200 Maint10 34 9,700 Project01 2018 Table 4.26. Maintenance Facilities Inventory Data. Input Field Value Agency Replacement Cost ($) 1,250 Maintenance ($/year) 25.00 Table 4.27. Maintenance Facilities Model Parameters.

100 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Figure 4.45. Maintenance Facilities Model. Age Units (sq ft) Description 8 6,100 Admin01 24 16,400 Admin02 34 9,100 Admin03 1 3,400 Admin04 Additional Parameters Value Agency Replacement Cost ($) 500 Maintenance ($/year) 10.00 Table 4.28. Administrative Facilities Inventory and Additional Parameters Inputs.

TAPT Tutorials 101 48. Input the following information into the model: • Asset Type: Facilities-Building Utilities • Asset Description: HVAC • Asset Units of Measure: square feet • Inventory Description and Additional Parameters: Use the inputs from Table 4.29 49. Review the Summary Results and note that the Average Annual Cost is $25.03 and the Cost-Minimizing Replacement Age is 35 years (Figure 4.47). Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Figure 4.46. Administrative Facility Model.

Age Units (sq ft) Description Pipeline Year 1 3,600 HVAC-Maint01 23 3,750 HVAC-Maint02 1 33,200 HVAC-Maint03 27 5,300 HVAC-Maint04 24 18,500 HVAC-Maint05 27 4,800 HVAC-Maint06 27 41,400 HVAC-Maint07 5 6,200 HVAC-Maint08 1 150 HVAC-Maint09 16 45,200 HVAC-Maint10 34 9,700 Project01 2018 8 6,100 HVAC-Admin01 2 16,400 HVAC-Admin02 34 9,100 HVAC-Admin03 1 3,400 HVAC-Admin04 Asset Replacement Costs Value Agency Replacement Cost ($) 200 Table 4.29. HVAC Inventory Data. Figure 4.47. HVAC Model.

TAPT Tutorials 103 Roof STA maintains condition data for roof assets maintained by the Authority. The condi- tion data is collected based on a five-point scale used by TERM Lite. Therefore, you decide to use the condition-based model for roof assets. The units are measured in square feet of roof area. 50. On the Start Screen, select Create Asset Group. 51. Name the Asset Group ID Code “Roof” and for the model type select Condition-Based Model, before selecting Create New Group. 52. Select the Asset Type “Facilities-Maintenance Building.” 53. In the Asset Description text field name the asset “Roof.” 54. In the Asset Units of Measure text field enter “square feet.” 55. Using the data from Table 4.30, input the Replacement and Rehabilitation cost data. 56. Using the data from Table 4.31, input the Inventory Description data. You also determined that the deterioration rate of roofs is higher than the default assets populated in the model. You are able to discern this based on your history of condition data. (More detail on roofs and condition data is available in the King County Pilot Memo, included in the Final Research Report at http://www.trb.org/Main/Blurbs/171285.aspx.) Therefore, you increase the chance that roof condition would decrease if the agency did the minimum. 57. Using the data from Table 4.32, input the Transition Probabilities data. Review the Summary Results and note that the model suggests that the Recommended Action for assets in State 5, 4, and 3 is Do Minimum (Figure 4.48). When the asset is in State 2 or 1, the recommended action is Replace (with a Prioritization Index of 0.40 and 0.92, respectively). The Average Annual Cost for roof is $1.46 per square foot. Select Click for Main Menu when complete. Unit Agency Replacement Cost ($) $20.75 Unit Agency Rehabilitation Cost ($) $20.75 Table 4.30. Roof Inventory Data. Condition Units (Sq Ft) Description Pipeline Year 2-Marginal 3,600 Roof-Maint01 3-Adequate 3,750 Roof-Maint02 2-Marginal 33,200 Roof-Maint03 4-Good 5,300 Roof-Maint04 2-Marginal 9,250 Roof-Maint05 1-Poor 4,800 Roof-Maint06 3-Adequate 41,400 Roof-Maint07 4-Good 6,200 Roof-Maint08 1-Poor 150 Roof-Maint09 3-Adequate 45,200 Roof-Maint10 3-Adequate 9,700 Project01 2018 4-Good 6,100 Roof-Admin01 2-Marginal 4,100 Roof-Admin02 5-Excellent 9,100 Roof-Admin03 5-Excellent 1,700 Roof-Admin04 Table 4.31. Roof Inventory Data.

104 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Results: Springfield Transit Authority Unconstrained Scenario When all of the data inputs had been specified, you return to the Budgets and Parameters worksheet. The agency first wanted to run the prioritization model with an unconstrained bud- get to better understand the full extent of the agency’s needs and to understand how the model would prioritize replacement projects if funding was not a factor. 1. From the start screen, click Budgets & Parameters. 2. Set the Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation ($) to “999,999,999” for years 2013 to 2032. 3. Select Click for Main Menu to return to the start screen. The next step is to run to model using the defined budget. 4. Select Run Prioritization Model and define the ID Code as “Unconstrained” to describe the run. Then click OK to run the model. When the analysis has been completed, the model will open a Program List for the Uncon- strained run. 5. Review the Program List and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. Note that with an unconstrained budget the following assets would be replaced between 2013 and 2032: • 470 buses replaced • 78 light rail cars replaced • 258,300 miles of track replaced • 30,200 miles of guideway replaced • 10 maintenance facilities replaced, totaling 130,100 square feet • 9 HVAC systems replaced, totaling 147,450 square feet • 28 roof replacement projects, totaling 356,300 square feet 6. Click Display Summary Table and select the “Unconstrained” run before selecting Display Summary Table. Figure 4.49 shows the summary table for the unconstrained run. • Average condition for non-vehicle assets is projected to remain the same with an uncon- strained budget. State Action 5 Excellent 4 Good 3 Adequate 2 Marginal 1 Poor 5 Excellent Do Minimum 85.0% 15.0% Rehab Replace 4 Good Do Minimum 75.0% 25.0% Rehab Replace 3 Adequate Do Minimum 60.0% 40.0% Rehab Replace 2 Marginal Do Minimum 50.0% 25.0% Rehab Replace 1 Poor Do Minimum 50.0% Rehab Replace Table 4.32. Transition Probabilities Data.

TAPT Tutorials 105 Figure 4.48. Roof Condition Model.

106 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan • Even with an unconstrained budget, passenger delay will increase somewhat over time, and MDBF will decrease. This is largely a result of the projected increase in age of light rail vehicles (many of which are now relatively new). • The model shows there are unmet needs at the beginning of 2023, but with an uncon- strained budget these are actually addressed by the end of the year in the simulation. Table 4.33 shows the summary results calculated using the unconstrained program and com- pared to the initial values. 7. Review the Summary Table and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. 8. From the start screen, select Display Chart-One Run. 9. Select “Needs ($)” as the Prioritization Model Output Variable to chart, then select “Unconstrained” as the Run to chart before clicking Display Chart. 10. Review the Needs ($) chart, shown in Figure 4.50, and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. 11. Input the following information to create two additional charts: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.51, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” the Run “Unconstrained.” Figure 4.49. STA Unconstrained Program Summary Results. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2032 Unconstrained Remaining Backlog $ 45,985,188 $ 0 Cumulative Spent - $ 1,063,478,425 MDBF (miles) 32,553 30,403 Average TERM Condition (non- vehicle Assets) 4.71 4.72 Passenger Delay (hours) 99,291 159,001 CO2 Emissions (tons) 139,353 160,325 Other Agency Costs $ 87,251,440 $ 83,632,026 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 132,574,644 $ 129,851,990 Table 4.33. Summary Results Unconstrained Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 107 • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.52, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Average Condition Rating” and the Run “Unconstrained.” Do Nothing Scenario Next, you run a scenario where no work is performed, to determine the worst-case scenario if all assets were allowed to deteriorate over a 20-year period. This will provide a comparison to the unconstrained program and also illustrates the effects of asset deterioration. 12. Adjust the following on the Budgets and Parameters page: • Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation (Years 2013–2032): 0 13. Run a prioritization model with the ID Code “Do Nothing.” 14. Review the Program List and the Summary Table, shown in Figure 4.53. $ Figure 4.50. STA Needs ($) Unconstrained Scenario. M ile s 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 2 3 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.51. STA Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Unconstrained Scenario.

108 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Table 4.34 shows the summary results of the Do Nothing scenario compared to the Uncon- strained scenario, showing the condition of the assets in 20 years in a best-case scenario where all assets are replaced as needed and the worst-case scenario where no replacement activity is programmed. In the Do Nothing program, you note a significant decrease the mean distance between failures (see Figure 4.54), and in average condition (see Figure 4.55), as well as increases in passenger hours of delay and associated costs. 15. Input the following information to create three charts, showing conditions between 2016 and 2025 in a “Do Nothing” scenario: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.56, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Needs ($)” the Run “Do Nothing.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.54, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” and the Run “Do Nothing.” • Chart Three, shown in Figure 4.55, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Average Condition Rating” and the Run “Do Nothing.” A ve ra ge C on di tio n Ra tin g 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.52. STA Average Condition Rating Unconstrained Scenario. Figure 4.53. STA Do Nothing Program Summary Results.

Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2032 Do Nothing Unconstrained Remaining Backlog $ 45,985,188 $ 911,259,738 $ 0 Cumulative Spent - $ 14,266,275 $ 1,063,478,425 MDBF (miles) 32,553 6,344 30,403 Average TERM Condition (non- vehicle Assets) 4.71 3.92 4.72 Passenger Delay (hours) 99,291 409,133 159,001 CO2 Emissions (tons) 139,353 243,212 160,325 Other Agency Costs $ 87,251,440 $ 225,345,444 $ 83,632,026 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 132,574,644 $ 358,469,499 $ 129,851,990 Table 4.34. Summary Results Do Nothing and Unconstrained Scenarios. 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 M ile s Figure 4.54. STA Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Do Nothing Scenario. A ve ra ge C on di tio n Ra tin g 20 1 3 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.55. STA Average Condition Rating Do Nothing Scenario.

110 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan $35M Annual Budget Scenario After reviewing the previous results, input the agency’s approximate annual capital asset replacement budget of $35,000,000. Table 4.35 shows the results of this analysis compared to other scenarios. 16. Adjust the following on the Budgets and Parameters page: • Budget for Asset Replacement and Rehabilitation (Years 2013–2032): 35,000,000 17. Run a prioritization model with the ID Code “$35M Annual.” 18. Review the Program List and the Summary Table, shown in Figure 4.57. In reviewing the program list, STA noted the following actions are projected: • 270 buses replaced • 58 light rail cars replaced $ 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.56. STA Needs ($) Do Nothing Scenario. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2032 Do Nothing $ 35M Annual Scenario Unconstrained Remaining Backlog $ 45,985,188 $ 911,259,738 $ 405,013,450 $ 0 Cumulative Spent - $ 14,266,275 $ 644,198,700 $ 1,063,478,425 MDBF (miles) 32,553 6,344 21,010 30,403 Average TERM Condition (non- vehicle Assets) 4.71 3.92 4.42 4.72 Passenger Delay (hours) 99,291 409,133 162,157 159,001 CO2 Emissions (tons) 139,353 243,212 164,241 160,325 Other Agency Costs $ 87,251,440 $ 225,345,444 $ 113,453,518 $ 83,632,026 Total Agency, User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 132,574,644 $ 358,469,499 $ 170,505,793 $ 129,851,990 Table 4.35. Summary Results Do Nothing, $35M Annually, and Unconstrained Scenarios.

TAPT Tutorials 111 Figure 4.57. STA Annual Budget Scenario Summary Results. $ 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.58. STA Needs ($) Annual Budget Scenario. • 83,100 miles of track replaced • 29,450 miles of guideway replaced • 5 maintenance facilities replaced, totaling 61,350 square feet • 7 HVAC systems replaced, totaling 92,550 square feet • 27 roof replacement projects, totaling 346,600 square feet • Every roof (15 total) replaced at least once during the analysis period 19. Input the following information to create three charts, showing conditions between 2013 and 2032 in a “Do Nothing” scenario: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.58, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Needs ($)” and the Run “$35M Annual.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.59, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” and the Run “$35M Annual.” • Chart Three, shown in Figure 4.60, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Average Condition Rating” and the Run “$35M Annual.”

112 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan After assessing the summary data, you review the suggested program. On the program list, you observe the following: • Some roof projects are being programmed for replacement twice during the 20-year analysis-period. • Multiple instances are occurring where roof, HVAC, and/or building overhauls are being programmed for the same building in multiple years over a short time period. STA is worried that performing major replacement and overhaul tasks on the same building, spread out over multiple years, might have adverse effects for agency operations and disrupt normal business for longer periods. To address this issue, you decide to combine major replace- ment and overhaul tasks occurring on the same building into single projects, to be programmed together in the analysis. STA also noted the cost benefits of grouping tasks and allowing work M ile s 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.59. STA Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) Annual Budget Scenario. A ve ra ge C on di tio n Ra tin g 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.60. STA Average Condition Rating Annual Budget Scenario.

TAPT Tutorials 113 to be performed on all systems of the building. You decide only to group projects that have been programmed in the $35M annual scenario to ensure that the initial results are not changed significantly. Therefore, you choose to group the following projects: 20. Click Edit Asset Group and select “Maint Facilities.” Then click Edit Selected Group. 21. In the Project Code column, change the building codes to the new project codes in Table 4.36. For example, change “Maint04” to “Project-Maint04.” Complete this for all other buildings indicated in the table, then select Click for Main Menu when finished. 22. Repeat Steps 11–12 for HVAC and Roof assets, changing the appropriate Project Code to the new project code in Table 4.36. Each model must be updated individually. $35M Adjusted Program Scenario After combining replacement activities on various building in the analysis, STA ran the pri- oritization model a second time to determine an improved program list. 23. Return to the start screen and select Run Prioritization Model, defining the ID Code as “$35M Adjusted” to describe the run. The annual budget should not be adjusted for this scenario. STA compared the two outputs in the Summary Results, shown in Table 4.37, and noted that despite the grouping of facility work there are only small differences in the Remaining Backlog and Cumulative Spent in the two scenarios shown in the table. After comparing the annual budget and adjusted program scenarios, you notice that there are some small but significant changes in the final program. In the Adjusted Scenario, the cumulative Building Code HVAC Code Roof Code New Project Code Maint04 Roof-Maint04 HVAC-Maint04 Project-Maint04 Maint06 Roof-Maint06 HVAC-Maint06 Project-Maint06 Maint07 Roof-Maint07 HVAC-Maint07 Project-Maint07 Maint09 Roof-Maint09 HVAC-Maint09 Project-Maint09 Table 4.36. Model Adjustments. Scenarios Initial Value Value in 2032 $ 35M Annual Scenario $ 35M Adjusted Scenario Remaining Backlog $ 45,985,188 $ 405,013,450 $ 405,013,450 Cumulative Spent - $ 644,198,700 $ 643,156,963 MDBF (miles) 32,553 21,010 21,010 Average TERM Condition (non- vehicle Assets) 4.71 4.42 4.42 Passenger Delay (hours) 99,291 162,157 162,157 CO2 Emissions (tons) 139,353 164,241 164,241 Other Agency Costs $ 87,251,440 $ 113,453,518 $ 133,742,072 Total Agency,User and External Costs Excluding Budget Expenditures $ 132,574,644 $ 170,505,793 $ 170,794,346 Table 4.37. Summary Results $35M Annually and $35M Adjusted.

114 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan spent over the 20-year period increased a little over $1M dollars. While there was no change in the majority of projects programmed, there were 23 roof replacement projects in the Adjusted Program, as opposed to 27 roof replacements in the Annual Scenario. A complete program list is provided in Table 4.38. Comparative graphs, showing the needs, average asset condition, and the mean distance between failures for the annual budget and adjusted program scenarios are shown in Figures 4.61, 4.62, and 4.63. 24. From the Start Screen, select Display Chart-Two Runs. 25. Select “Needs ($)” as the Prioritization Model Output Variable to chart, then select “$35M Annual” and “$35M Adjusted” as the Runs to chart before clicking Display Chart. 26. Review the Needs ($) chart, shown in Figure 4.61, and select Click for Main Menu when you have finished. Input the following information to create two additional charts: • Chart One, shown in Figure 4.62, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Mean Distance Between Failures (miles)” the Runs “$35M Adjusted” and “$35M Annual.” • Chart Two, shown in Figure 4.63, with the Prioritization Model Output Variable selected as “Average Condition Rating” and the Runs “$35M Adjusted” and “$35M Annual.” Program Year Asset Description Project Code Units Cost Project Rank PI 2013 Roof Roof-Maint05 9,250 $ 191,938 1 0.6624 2013 Roof Roof-Admin02 4,100 $ 77,813 1 0.6624 2013 Roof Roof-Maint01 3,600 $ 85,075 3 0.6624 2013 Roof Roof-Maint03 33,200 $ 688,900 3 0.6624 2014 Roof Roof-Maint02 3,750 $ 77,813 1 0.2688 2014 Roof Roof-Maint10 45,200 $ 937,900 1 0.2688 2014 Guideway (Embedded and XC) GuideXC01 12,100 $ 38,006,100 3 0.2623 2014 Guideway (Embedded and XC) GuideXC02 1,000 $ 3,141,000 4 0.0607 2014 HVAC HVAC-Admin03 9,100 $ 1,820,000 5 0.0069 2015 Track (Embedded and XC) TrackXC01 24,250 $ 19,885,000 1 0.0046 2017 Roof Roof-Maint08 6,200 $ 128,650 1 0.1270 2017 Roof Roof-Admin01 6,100 $ 126,575 1 0.1270 2017 Bus Bus01 100 $ 38,400,000 3 0.0338 2017 Bus Bus02 100 $ 38,400,000 3 0.0338 2018 Maintenance Facilities Project01 9,700 $ 12,125,000 1 0.0134 2018 HVAC Project01 9,700 $ 1,940,000 1 0.0134 2018 Roof Project01 9,700 $ 201,275 1 0.0134 2018 Guideway (Embedded and XC) GuideXC03 750 $ 2,355,750 4 0.0093 2018 Light Rail LightRail01 6 $ 27,000,000 5 0.0079 2019 Track (Curved) TrackCR01 15,000 $ 13,860,000 1 0.0016 2020 Bus Bus03 42 $ 16,128,000 1 0.0153 2020 Light Rail LightRail02 8 $ 36,000,000 2 0.0079 2020 Track (Special) TrackSP01 2,100 $ 7,929,600 3 0.0060 2021 Bus Bus05 7 $ 2,688,000 1 0.0153 2021 Track (Embedded and XC) TrackXC02 1,700 $ 1,394,000 2 0.0046 Table 4.38. $35M Adjusted Program Scenario Complete Program List.

TAPT Tutorials 115 Program Year Asset Description Project Code Units Cost Project Rank PI 2025 Roof Roof-Maint02 3,750 $ 77,813 1 0.0823 2025 Roof Roof-Maint10 45,200 $ 937,900 2 0.0823 2025 Guideway GuideXC04 2,500 $ 7,852,500 3 0.0093 2025 Track (Tangent Ballasted) TrackBL01 11,000 $ 7,029,000 4 0.0053 2025 Track (Tangent Curved) TrackCR02 24,800 $ 22,915,200 5 0.0016 2026 Track (Special) TrackSP02 2,750 $ 10,384,000 1 0.0060 2027 Track (Embedded and XC) TrackXC03 1,500 $ 1,230,000 1 0.0046 2028 Roof Roof-Admin01 6,100 $ 126,575 1 0.0823 2028 Roof Roof-Maint08 6,200 $ 128,650 2 0.0823 2028 Guideway (Embedded and XC) GuideXC01 12,100 $ 38,006,100 3 0.0093 2028 Guideway (Embedded and XC) GuideXC02 1,000 $ 3,141,000 3 0.0093 2029 Light Rail Light Rail04 15 $ 67,500,000 1 0.0163 2029 Light Rail Light Rail05 10 $ 45,000,000 2 0.0163 2031 Light Rail LightRail06 12 $ 54,000,000 1 0.0163 2024 Roof Roof-Maint05 9,250 $ 191,938 1 0.0823 2024 Roof Roof-Admin02 4,100 $ 85,075 1 0.0823 2024 Roof Roof-Maint01 3,600 $ 74,700 1 0.0823 2024 Roof Roof-Maint03 33,200 $ 688,900 4 0.0823 2024 Bus Bus07 5 $ 1,920,000 5 0.0153 2024 Bus Bus08 6 $ 2,304,000 5 0.0153 2024 HVAC HVAC-Maint02 3,750 $ 750,000 7 0.0032 2021 Maintenance Facilities Project-Maint06 4,800 $ 6,000,000 3 0.0023 2021 HVAC Project-Maint06 4,800 $ 960,000 3 0.0023 2021 Roof Project-Maint06 4,800 $ 99,600 3 0.0023 2022 Bus Bus04 4 $ 1,536,000 1 0.0153 2022 Bus Bus06 6 $ 2,304,000 1 0.0153 2022 Maintenance Facilities Project-Maint07 41,400 $ 51,700,000 3 0.0052 2022 HVAC Project-Maint07 41,400 $ 8,280,000 3 0.0052 2022 Roof Project-Maint07 41,400 $ 859,050 3 0.0052 2022 Maintenance Facilities Project-Maint09 150 $ 187,500 6 0.0027 2022 HVAC Project-Maint09 150 $ 30,000 6 0.0027 2022 Roof Project-Maint09 150 $ 3,113 6 0.0027 2022 Maintenance Facilities Project-Maint04 5,300 $ 6,625,000 9 0.0020 2022 HVAC Project-Maint04 5,300 $ 1,060,00 9 0.0020 2022 Roof Project-Maint04 5,300 $ 109,975 9 0.0020 2023 Roof Roof-Admin03 9,100 $ 188,825 1 0.0823 2023 Roof Roof-Admin04 1,700 $ 35,275 1 0.0823 2023 Light Rail LightRail03 7 $ 31,500,000 3 0.0079 2023 HVAC HVAC-Maint05 18,500 $ 3,700,000 4 0.0032 Table 4.38. (Continued).

$20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.61. Comparing STA Needs ($) between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and the Adjusted Program Scenario (black). M ile s 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.62. Comparing STA Mean Distance Between Failures (miles) between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and the Adjusted Program Scenario (black). A ve ra ge C on di tio n Ra tin g 20 13 20 14 20 15 20 16 20 17 20 18 20 19 20 20 20 21 20 22 20 23 20 24 20 25 20 26 20 27 20 28 20 29 20 30 20 31 20 32 Figure 4.63. Comparing STA Average Condition Rating between the Annual Budget Scenario (gray) and the Adjusted Program Scenario (black).

Next: Chapter 5 - Additional Resources »
Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Get This Book
×
 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan
Buy Paperback | $25.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 172: Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan provides tools and guidance to improve asset management. The Transit Asset Prioritization Tool, a spreadsheet that accompanies the report, may assist transit agencies in predicting the future conditions of their assets and prioritizing asset rehabilitation and replacement. The contractor’s final report summarizing the research and methodology of this project is also available online.

Software Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!