National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan (2014)

Chapter: Chapter 5 - Additional Resources

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Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Additional Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
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Page 117
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Additional Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 118
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Additional Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 119
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Additional Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 120
Page 121
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Additional Resources." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22306.
×
Page 121

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

117 2012 NTD Annual Reporting Manual. FTA, 2012. The NTD is the central repository for transit data from transit agencies throughout the United States. It serves to provide a standardized view of transit agencies serving metropolitan areas, and it is used by Congress to apportion FTA funds each year. All transit agencies receiving grant funding from FTA (under the Urbanized Area Formula Program or the Other than Urbanized Area (Rural) Formula Program) are required to report to the NTD. This manual provides specific instructions and guidance for reporting agencies. Elements of the NTD reporting guidelines and definitions are referenced in this guidebook and can assist agencies in developing the TAMP. For example, the NTD Asset Module Structure can serve as an agency’s Capital Asset Inventory (see Step 1.1 of Chapter 2 in this guidebook), and some of the metrics required for NTD report- ing can serve as performance measures in a TAMP (see Step 1.4 of Chapter 2 in this guidebook). The inventory description data required for the use of TAPT is formatted based on the NDT requirements (see Chapter 3 of this guidebook). This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://www.ntdprogram. gov/ntdprogram/pubs/ARM/2012/pdf/2012_annual_Manual_Complete.pdf Asset Management Guide: Focusing on the Management of Our Transit Investments. FTA, 2012. This document offers targeted guidance for transit agencies interested in advancing the practice and implementation of transit asset management. It brings together relevant research and guidance on transportation asset management and best practices in the transit industry to create a practical and useful guidance document. The contents of the document include: • An introduction to transit asset management—defines asset management for the transit industry, provides guidance for fitting asset management into other agency processes, etc. • Business process framework—each business process component is outlined and includes a description of how it fits into the greater asset management framework. The guide indicates the ways in which the components will work together, and how each one can be improved independently. • Information systems—provides an overview of existing information systems that can support asset management. • Implementation—offers guidance for implementation of assessment and implementation of an asset management process. • Asset management guide supplement—details the fundamental elements for consideration in lifecycle management by asset class. The guide includes best practice examples, in the form of case studies, highlighting transit agencies that have adopted elements of asset management processes and systems. C H A P T E R 5 Additional Resources

118 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Appendix A, The Asset Manage Guide Supplement, provides an overview by asset class on the practices of lifecycle management and industry standards. The document includes a chapter on each of the following: vehicles; facilities and stations; guideways; systems; and sustainability and asset management. This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://www.fta.dot.gov/ documents/FTA_Report_No._0027.pdf Cambridge Systematics, Inc., PB Consult, and Texas Transportation Institute. NCHRP Report 551: Performance Measures and Targets for Transportation Asset Management. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, DC, 2006. This report provides a comprehensive review of the use of performance measures for transportation asset management, focusing primarily on highway asset management. The report is divided into two volumes. Volume I is a research report that reviews current practices in use of performance measures for asset management, recommends criteria for selecting performance measures, discusses considerations in designing and using performance measures, and presents a framework for using performance measures to support asset management. Volume II is a practical guide for identifying performance measures and setting performance targets. It presents a step-by-step approach for agencies to follow, encompassing identifica- tion of measures, integration of performance measures into an organization, and establishing performance targets. This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://onlinepubs.trb.org/ onlinepubs/nchrp/nchrp_rpt_551.pdf International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 55000 Series, British Standards Institution, 2014. This series of three documents provides an overview of the international standard for asset management, and the use and implementation of asset management systems within the context of an organization. The guidance was developed through international cooperation and represents best practices that can be applied to a broad range of assets, and across a range of contexts and types of organizations. There are three documents in this series: • ISO 55000: Asset Management—Overview, Principles and Terminology. This document serves as the background documentation for the series and discusses asset management, its principles, definitions and terminology, and the benefits agencies can expect from utilizing the practice. • ISO 55001: Asset Management—Management Systems—Requirements. This document provides guidance on the organizational structure needed for best implementation of an asset manage- ment system. Topics include agency leadership, planning, support, operation, performance evaluation and improvement. • ISO 55002: Asset Management—Management Systems—Guidelines for the Application of ISO 55001. The final document in the series supports 55001 by providing guidance on how to apply an asset management system within your organization. Particularly relevant to the development of asset management plans are the planning require- ments in the standard. Specifically, Requirement 6.2.2 requires that organizations develop asset management plans that document: • The method and criteria for decision making and prioritizing of the activities and resources to achieve its asset management plan(s) and asset management objectives; • The process and methods to be employed in managing its assets over their lifecycles; • What will be done;

Additional Resources 119 • What resources will be required; • Who will be responsible; • When it will be completed; • How the results will be evaluated; • The appropriate time horizon(s) for the asset management plan(s); • The financial and non-financial implications of the asset management plan(s); • The review period for the asset management plan(s); • Actions to address risks and opportunities associated with managing the assets, taking into account how these risks and opportunities can change with time, by establishing processes for: – Identification of risks and opportunities; – Assessment of risks and opportunities; – Determining the significance of assets in achieving asset management objectives; – Implementation of the appropriate treatment, and monitoring, of risks and opportunities. Kittleson & Associates, Urbitran, LKC Consulting, MORPACE International, Queensland University of Technology, and Nakanishi, Y. TCRP Report 88: A Guidebook for Developing a Transit Performance–Measurement System. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, DC, 1995. This report provides guidance for transit system managers in developing a performance- measurement system that addresses customer and community issues. It presents characteristics of an effective performance measurement system that reflects different points of view and empha- sizes customer satisfaction. Twelve case studies provide examples of how transit agencies have successfully used performance measures. To implement a performance-measurement program, it proposes that agencies use an eight-step process: define goals and objectives; generate management support; identify users, stakeholders, and constraints; select performance measures and develop consensus; test and implement the program; monitor and report performance; integrate results into agency decision-making; and review and update the program. For each step, the report provides the tasks involved and examples of how transit agencies have accomplished that step. The report also contains a library of performance measures and categorizes them based on their focus. For each measure, it provides the use, mode, scope, applicable system size, audience, example target values, data requirements, and the factors that influence it. It also discusses data collection sources and techniques, methods to manage the data, methods to set performance standards, and reporting performance. This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://onlinepubs.trb. org/onlinepubs/tcrp/tcrp_report_88/Guidebook.pdf National Asset Management Steering Group (NAMS). International Infrastructure Manage- ment Manual (IIMM). Association of Local Government Engineering NZ Inc (INGENIUM) and the Institute of Public Works Engineering of Australia (IPWEA), 2011. This manual details principles, processes, and examples of infrastructure asset management. It introduces asset management concepts and describes how to implement an asset management approach, including enabling processes for asset management and supporting systems and data. The enabling processes discussed in the manual include levels of services, demand forecasting, condition assessment, optimized decision making (including optimizing resource allocation), maintenance management, and financial planning. Also, the manual includes country-specific guidance for Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, the UK, and the United States. The manual can be used for managing any infrastructure asset. Nonetheless, much of the guidance and many of the examples pertain to managing transportation assets. The manual is notable for its broad scope, and extensive set of examples and case studies.

120 Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan Publicly Available Specification (PAS) 55. BSI, 2008. This document has been superseded by the ISO 55000 series. PAS 55 is a specification from the BSI and the International Asset Management Committee designed to provide guidance in managing physical assets. The standard includes two parts. PAS 55-1 is a standard for “optimized management of physical assets.” PAS 55-2 is a set of guidelines for implementation. PAS 55 defines asset management as “the systematic and coordinated activities and practices through which an organization optimally and sustainably manages its assets and asset systems, their associated performance, risks and expenditures over their lifecycles for the purpose of achieving its orga- nizational strategic plan.” The asset management concepts detailed in PAS 55 are conceptually similar to those in the AASHTO Transportation Asset Management Guide and supplement, and in the IIMM. Like the IIMM, PAS 55 is intended to apply to a range of infrastructure assets, including, but not limited to, transportation assets. PAS 55 includes a 28-point requirements checklist describing mechanisms for establishing whole lifecycle planning, risk management, and cost/benefit analyses within the day-to-day activities of capital project implementation. Requirements include identifying and considering the needs of stakeholders over the lifecycle of the asset, specifying the interventions needed for minimum costs, and optimizing the timing of work to create the right groups of projects. Spy Pond Partners, KKO & Associates, H. Cohen and J. Barr. TCRP Report 157: State of Good Repair: Prioritizing the Rehabilitation and Replacement of Existing Capital Assets and Evaluat- ing the Implications for Transit. Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, DC, 2012. This document serves as the foundational research for the project resulting in this guidebook. The work is based on a review of literature and a discussion of current agency practices related to characterizing the impacts and implications of investments. The report also includes a section out- lining the related tools and approaches currently available to agencies. TCRP Report 157 resulted in a framework for transit agencies to use for prioritization of capital asset rehabilitation and replacement decisions, which was used in the development of TAPT and this guidebook. This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://onlinepubs.trb. org/onlinepubs/tcrp/tcrp_rpt_157.pdf TERM Lite Quick Start Guide. FTA, 2013. This document provides a practical guide for the use of FTA’s Transit Economic Requirements Model Lite (“TERM Lite”). TERM Lite is an electronic tool designed to help agencies estimate their transit capital investment needs over a specified future time period. The guide provides information on what is needed for use, how to input asset inventory data, and how to utilize the TERM Lite model. This model can be a helpful analysis tool for use in development of the Transit Asset Management Plan (TAMP) (e.g., to develop deterioration models—Step 2.2 in Chapter 2 of this guidebook). The Quick Start Guide also includes an Asset Classification list, which can serve as a framework for agencies building a capital asset inventory (Step 1.1 of the TAMP, see Chapter 2 of this guidebook for more detail). This document is available at the following URL (accessed June 2014): http://www.fta.dot. gov/documents/TERM-Lite_v2.0_Quick_Start_Guide.pdf

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S.DOT United States Department of Transportation

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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 172: Guidance for Developing a Transit Asset Management Plan provides tools and guidance to improve asset management. The Transit Asset Prioritization Tool, a spreadsheet that accompanies the report, may assist transit agencies in predicting the future conditions of their assets and prioritizing asset rehabilitation and replacement. The contractor’s final report summarizing the research and methodology of this project is also available online.

Software Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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