National Academies Press: OpenBook

Safety Reporting Systems at Airports (2014)

Chapter: Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions

« Previous: Chapter Three - Airport Safety Data Collection
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Safety Reporting Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22353.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Safety Reporting Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22353.
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Page 29
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Safety Reporting Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22353.
×
Page 29
Page 30
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Safety Reporting Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22353.
×
Page 30
Page 31
Suggested Citation:"Chapter Four - Staff Responsibilities and Functions ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2014. Safety Reporting Systems at Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22353.
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Page 31

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27 At U.S. airports multiple divisions, departments, and functions support the safe operations of an air- port. Some airports participating in the study have begun to implement voluntary safety programs through SMS. All are faced with the ongoing challenge of logistics, coordination, and communica- tion across various internal and external lines of business. To better understand safety data collection and reporting, interviewees were asked to provide figures for the total of staff with safety-related roles, identifying both dedicated and collateral duties to support the data collection, analysis, investigation, and reporting functions. STAFF-DEDICATED AND COLLATERAL DUTIES The following summary provides a list of dedicated staff with safety-related and collateral safety duties by the airport’s NPIAS category. Many respondents reported that safety roles crossed multiple departments, including operations, maintenance, security, police, ARFF, EMT, dispatch, and SMS and that the collateral duties were integrated into existing duties, such as self-inspections, accident investigations, maintenance repairs, 911 and ARFF response, and medical runs. Few airport repre- sentatives indicated that a dedicated staff was assigned the sole duty of safety management, including data collection and analysis. The highest number reported was four staff at a medium hub; however, the interviewee commented that, although staff was managing safety, they are not fully dedicated to SMS. Of the 13 airports reporting the assignment of dedicated staff, most indicated a single staff member was appointed the SMS duty, regardless of the size of the airport operation, and that the other dedicated staff included employee health and safety or emergency response functions. See interviewee comments in Table A1 in Appendix A for additional clarification regarding the groups considered within the collateral safety duties for each airport. Total staff counts (presented in low to high ranges) for both dedicated and collateral are sum- marized as follows: Large hub Dedicated 0 to 2 Collateral 23 to 615 Medium hub Dedicated 0 to 4 Collateral 15 to 300+ Small hub Dedicated 0 to 3 Collateral 6 to 30 Nonhub Dedicated 0 to 3 Collateral 5 to 300 GA/Reliever Dedicated 0 to 0 Collateral 2 to <10 DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS AND DATA MANAGEMENT A series of questions was asked to determine “who does what” relating to safety data management. The purpose of the questions was to investigate how many different departments were performing similar functions related to safety data collection, analysis, and management report development. The anticipated response was that multiple staff and departments used separate systems, manual processes, software programs, and procedures to manage data. To reflect the various departments and functional areas possibly involved in data management, the respondents were asked, “What staff or departments are responsible for the following: (For chapter four STAFF RESPONSIBILITIES AND FUNCTIONS Few airport representatives indi- cated that dedicated safety staff was assigned a single duty.

28 example, Operations, Risk, Maintenance, Corporate)?” The questions were grouped into three types of activities: A. Safety Data Collection 1) Data and Safety Report Collection 2) Safety Report Review and Analysis 3) Data Scrubbing and Deidentification B. Assessment and Investigations 1) Accident/Incident Investigation 2) Hazard Assessment C. Analysis and Development 1) Data Analysis and Trending 2) Management Reports Development and Distribution A total number of responses by department participating in each of the three data management functions was collected and compiled into a matrix for analysis. Table 21 reflects the total counts by department and data management function. A summary of the aggregated results is presented in Figure 5, and details for each of the three areas (A, B, and C) are presented in Figures 6, 7, and 8. As shown in Figure 5, many airport departments perform similar duties relating to data collec- tion, review, analysis, investigation, tracking, trending, and report development, with the majority of data management efforts documented in operations, police, ARFF/fire, and maintenance, followed by risk, and management. Duplication of efforts, redundant data reporting, and silos of information Functions A) Safety Data Collection B) Assessment and Investigations C) Analysis and Development Departments Data and Safety Report Collection Safety Report Review and Analysis Data Scrubbing and Deidentification Accident Incident Investigation Hazard Assessment Data Analysis and Trending Management Report Development and Distribution ARFF/Fire 12 11 1 20 7 8 7 Communications center 2 0 0 0 0 1 0 Construction 0 0 0 0 4 0 0 Customer service 0 1 0 0 0 0 0 EMT 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Environmental 1 1 0 0 1 1 1 FAA 0 0 1 2 0 0 0 Facility management 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 Health and safety 2 3 0 1 1 2 4 Landside 1 1 0 3 0 1 1 Legal 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Management 3 5 1 6 8 6 4 Maintenance 16 9 0 3 6 6 3 NTSB 0 0 0 1 0 0 0 Operations 31 25 2 30 25 23 22 Operations wildlife 0 0 1 0 2 1 1 Police 16 11 2 25 6 8 7 Public safety 4 5 1 5 4 0 1 Risk 9 12 4 9 8 11 10 Security 2 2 0 2 1 1 1 SMS 4 5 3 4 4 5 4 TABLE 21 TOTAL COUNT OF REPORTING FUNCTION BY DEPARTMENT

29 FIGURE 5 Summary of data activities by functions. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 Data and Safety Report Collection Safety Report Review and Analysis Data Scrubbing and De-identification Accident Incident Investigation Hazard Assessment Data Analysis and Trending Management Reports Development and Distribution 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 ARFF/Fire Com Center Construction Customer Service EMT Environmental FAA Facility Mgmt. Health and Safety Landside Legal Management MX NTSB Ops Ops Wildlife Police Public Safety Risk Security SMS Data Scrubbing and De-identification Safety Report Review and Analysis Data and Safety Report Collection FIGURE 6 Safety data collection.

30 0 5 10 15 20 25 ARFF/Fire Com Center Construction Customer Service EMT Environmental FAA Facility Mgmt. Health and Safety Landside Legal Management MX NTSB Ops Ops Wildlife Police Public Safety Risk Security SMS Data Reports Development and Distribution Data Analysis and Trending FIGURE 8 Analysis and development. 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 ARFF/Fire Com Center Construction Customer Service EMT Environmental FAA Facility Mgmt. Health and Safety Landside Legal Management MX NTSB Ops Ops Wildlife Police Public Safety Risk Security SMS Hazard Assessment Accident Incident Investigation FIGURE 7 Assessment and investigations.

31 are possible outcomes of the responses represented; however, Figure 5 demonstrates that multiple departments are collecting, managing, and reporting on a variety of safety data. The potential for data centralization, consolidation, and reporting could result in more efficient and effective data management, analysis, retrieval, and reporting and provide management with a collective view of safety activities throughout the airport. Figure 6 provides a detail of data collection activities by department. The three areas include data collection, deidentification, report review, and analysis. The three departments with the highest level of data collection activities, as reported by respondents, include operations, police, and maintenance. Safety report review takes place less frequently in these departments; however, in risk, where safety reports typically are collected from others, review of the safety reports has a higher occurrence. With regard to data scrubbing or deidentification, risk, SMS, and police are most likely to perform this activity. Figure 7 presents a detail of the hazard assessment and accident incident investigation activities by department. As shown, operations, police, and ARFF conduct the most accident and incident investigations, with hazard assessments more frequently performed by operations than either police or fire. Also note that risk, management, maintenance, public safety, and construction departments participate in hazard assessments, which typically are part of incident or accident follow-up. Under construction, respondents reported that hazard assessments were performed as part of FAA’s SRM requirements. Figure 8 illustrates details for data analysis, report development, and distribution. Airport opera- tions was the most likely to perform data analysis and trending, with risk and police completing the top three. ARFF, management, maintenance, and SMS also conduct data analysis and trending as part of their duties. Report development and distribution is highest within airport operations departments, with similar results for risk and police. Of interest is the higher occurrence of analysis activities than report development in all of the top three departments and, indeed, in all of the departments shown with one exception. In health and safety, analysis and trending occur less frequently than do report development and distribution.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 58: Safety Reporting Systems at Airports describes safety reporting methods and systems for airports certificated under Title 14 Code of Federal Regulations Part 139 by assessing current practices, processes, and systems used to collect and analyze safety data and information.

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