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Page 40
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - A Sampling of WBEMCTs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22455.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - A Sampling of WBEMCTs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22455.
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Page 41
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - A Sampling of WBEMCTs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22455.
×
Page 42
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - A Sampling of WBEMCTs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22455.
×
Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - A Sampling of WBEMCTs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2013. Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22455.
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Page 44

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

40 The following list contains a brief description of some of the emergency management systems available in the marketplace as of mid-2012.3 CommandCore Developed by TechRadium Website: http://www.domesticpreparedness.com/Industry/Industry_Updates/TechRadium_ Inc._Introduces_CommandCore_-_The_Next_Generation_in_Emergency_Management/ CommandCore provides an integrated platform to prepare for, respond to, and recover from emergencies, disasters, and threats. As a technology tool for emergency management, Command- Core is used to strengthen and improve the acquisition of information, analyze data, coordinate activities, and initiate mass communications. The CommandCore dashboard accomplishes the following: • Provides information in real time while conforming to the National Incident Management System (NIMS). • Uses a variety of methods to communicate with essential personnel—including one-to- one and one-to-many—through the use of mobile devices, land and mobile radios, and the like. • Utilizes the GPS to identify individuals on a map (using multi-point polygons or circles) and to contact them. DisasterLAN Developed by Buffalo Computer Graphics Website: http://www.buffalocomputergraphics.com/content/pages/dlan-crisis-info- mgmt-system The DisasterLAN incident management system with status board tracking capability accom- plishes the following: • Collects, tracks, and reports incident information and resources; • Uses a color-coded situation awareness module that highlights call center entries; A P P E N D I X B A Sampling of WBEMCTs 3 Information listed here reflects research conducted in March 2012; refer to the systems’ websites for changes and enhance- ments to these applications.

A Sampling of WBEMCTs 41 • Includes NIMS-compatible ICS forms; • Provides the ability to develop incident action plans; • Links to emergency management agencies; • Maintains graphical interface system mapping capability; • Provides a streaming video module; • Provides a weather module with local, regional, and national weather data; • Has broadcast message capability; and • Produces customized reports. E Team, E-Sponder Express, E-Sponder Alerts, and NC4 Risk Center Developed by NC4 Website: http://www.nc4.us/ESPONDER.php This collaboration tool assists first responders in effective incident management by facilitating data tracking and real-time communication. It requires servers, but may be able to reside on an existing airport system, and it could also be set up as SaaS. It is secure and interoperable with emergency management agencies. It includes the following features: • Configurable templates that enhance flexibility; • The capability to develop incident action plans; • A dashboard to track incidents and responses; • Position logbook, chat capability, checklists, and customized reports; • Automated field updates on various dashboard screens based on a single data entry; • Documented resource accountability that supports after-action reporting; • NIMS-compatible ICS forms; • Message capability through E-Sponder Alerts; • Maps recognized by E-Sponder Express, which can be imported and exported; • GIS mapping capability that visually communicates critical information using Bing maps or Esri map services; and • A Risk Center that includes active weather alerts, monitors global risk inputs, and alerts opera- tors about areas of concern. Knowledge Center Developed by Knowledge Center Website: http://www.knowledge-center.com/ Knowledge Center is an intuitive, daily-use tool that helps emergency managers prepare for, respond to, and recover from large-scale incidents such as floods and chemical spills. It can be used to monitor significant planned events such as conventions and sporting events. Installed in various configurations, it is generally installed as a server at primary and back-up site, but can also be set up as SaaS. It is currently in use throughout Pennsylvania (47 out of 58 counties), and provides the following: • COP and graphical displays through Esri; • A status dashboard used to track, log, and update incidents; • An internally developed message notification system; and • ICS-based methodology for tracking incidents and events.

42 Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Tools into Airport Operations—A Primer MissionMode Alert and Situation Center Developed by MissionMode Solutions Website: http://www.missionmode.com/solutions/incident_management/features.htm MissionMode is used by control centers and emergency management personnel to manage daily operations issues with seamless escalation into emergency management when a crisis hits. It can be tuned to fit airport operations and their people, teams, processes, checklists, resources, and notifications and is currently used by eight airports across the United States and Europe. MissionMode is offered as subscription SaaS with no additional hardware to purchase and has on-site, web-based, or computer-based tutorials available. It provides logging, collaboration, checklists, contacts, resources, and notification capability with user-friendly drag and drop fields such as text, dropdown lists, checkboxes, and date selectors, and COP. It has the capability to do the following: • Provide a clear overview of activities through the dashboard; • Log activities, status, and progress, situational awareness, and incidents to form an audit trail; • Build NIMS-compliant forms using a visual forms designer; • Document foreign object debris, airside and landside activities, maintenance, weather events, Notices to Airmen, and other activities; • Set up notifications (the notification feature is integrated into logging); and • Send and receive information from mobile devices. MissionMode combines smartphone functionality, web-based control console, and emergency notification in one integrated system. Two-way messages and location-based services are avail- able even when traditional text, email, and voice communications channels are not functioning. OpsCenter Developed by Alert Technologies Corp Website: http://www.alerttech.com/OpsCenter/emergency/management/software/content/ opscenter-emergency-management-software-suite OpsCenter provides a dashboard for tracking incidents and status information on an airport or in a municipality. It is installed within the airport architecture, but may require a separate server. It includes the following features: • Automated journaling, maps, status boards, and checklists; • The capability to assign tasks and track actions taken; • Position-based login and permissions authorized based on requirement; • Adaptable, configurable screens that allow users to modify required information they need access to; • NIMS-compatible ICS forms; and • A graphic user interface to view incidents on a map. Response Management Information System Developed by Public Safety Systems, Inc. Website: http://www.pssi.com/ Response Management Information System provides the following features: • Standard mapping functions that apply to the display, including the ability to pan, zoom, apply and remove labels, and layer control;

A Sampling of WBEMCTs 43 • Integration with RESPONSE™ CAD that allows real-time transfer of information to a database; • Canned reports for units, incidents, operators, time analysis, and summaries, plus capability to create ad-hoc queries and reports; • The ability to perform flexible queries against CAD incident and unit data elements, includ- ing remarks; • A button to map search results on a pin-map and then click on pins to view incident details; • The ability to perform queries to help define hot spots, provide up-to-the-minute data for roll call, and utilize many other crime analysis features; and • Multiple displays that can be viewed, saved, or printed. Situator Developed by NICE Systems Website: http://www.nice.com/situation-management/nice-situator The NICE Situator is a situation management software platform that enables situation plan- ning, response, and analysis. It provides the following features: • A planning tool that can be used to plan complicated procedures and respond to routine and emergency situations; • Rule-based task activation with event-triggered and time-triggered activation, sensor com- mands, automatic notifications, resource assignment, and escalation policies; • Control room and mobile applications that provide real-time unified activity monitoring and control for all connected devices and systems; • The capability to deploy and monitor the status of pre-planned procedures and send multi- media messages using all types of communication systems; and • Simulation and analysis tools that enable detailed incident reporting and debriefing with time-coded playback of events. Virtual Agility Developed by Virtual Agility Website: http://virtualagility.com/6836/index.html Virtual Agility is a customized and configurable dashboard for tracking incidents and assign- ing resources. The system’s geospatial capabilities work with widely established open-source and commercial mapping products, and its technology partners include IBM and Cisco. The system can be web based, server based, or SaaS. It provides the ability to do the following: • Support various formats for mapping depending on user requirements; • Accept feeds from weather data, video, radio frequency identification, and a number of other sources; • Interface with FEMA forms; and • Integrate social media into a single source that bridges the public/private community. WebEOC Developed by ESi Website: http://esi911.com/esi/index.php/products-mainmenu-68?id=387 WebEOC is a web-enabled and locally configurable incident and event management system. This collaboration tool creates a COP, allowing responders and emergency managers to share

44 Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Tools into Airport Operations—A Primer information and make sound decisions quickly. It is currently used by numerous states, counties, and airports nationwide. It requires a server installed at airport, and may be able to reside on an airport network environment. Various levels of pricing and support options are available. WebEOC provides the following: • A dashboard to track incidents and response updates; • A position logbook, chat, checklists, and customized reports; • NIMS-compatible ICS forms; • Secure interoperability with emergency management agencies; • The ability to develop incident action plans; • Links to emergency management agencies; and • Graphical interface system mapping capability.

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 94: Integrating Web-Based Emergency Management Collaboration Software into Airport Operations--A Primer provides information on how to evaluate and implement web-based collaboration tools that are designed to provide a common operating picture for both day-to-day operations and full emergency response management.

The primer explores the functions of web-based emergency management systems and is designed to aid airports in establishing requirements, procuring and installing systems, and implementing training.

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