National Academies Press: OpenBook

A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation (2013)

Chapter: Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan

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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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Suggested Citation:"Step 5 Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan." Transportation Research Board. 2013. A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22634.
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TASK 5.1 WRITE THE PLAN Turning all the preparation into a viable evacu- ation plan is the next step in the emergency evacuation process. The recorded results of the planning process in all functional areas can be used in drafting an outline. The plan may also include a number of annexes, such as roadway route plans, shelter locations, transit route pickup points, resource listings, and many other items as appropriate. Basic rules when preparing the document: 1. Keep the language simple and clear. Write at or below an eighth grade language level. 2. Summarize important information with checklists and visual aids such as maps and flowcharts. Any tools developed for the plan must be read- ily convertible to alternate formats. 3. Avoid using jargon and acronyms. 4. Use short sentences and the active voice. 5. Provide enough detail to be understandable, but not overwhelming. Focus on actions. 6. “Keep out of the weeds.” References to standard operating procedures and other detailed documents are preferable. 7. Qualifiers and vague words create confu- sion. Provide enough detail to convey an easily understood concept of operations. 8. Format, organize, and cross-reference the documentation so that readers and end users are able to find the options and solutions they need. STEP 5 PREPARE, REVIEW, AND APPROVE PLAN Some evacuation plans (e.g., the Atlanta Regional Evacuation Coordination Plan) begin the plan with a concise “first hour” checklist/ guide for chief elected officials, county/city managers and other decision makers. See the Resource Section, State and Municipal Plans and Guidance (page 177) for more examples.

Page 114 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan Tool 5.1 provides a Multijurisdictional Evacuation Coordination Template Outline. Much of the information required to fill in the pieces of the outline will have been devel- oped in the databases and operational plans developed through the steps of this guide. TASK 5.2 REVIEW THE PLAN Emergency agencies, homeland security officials, transportation and transit agencies, and other key stakeholders must review the plan and add their suggestions on improving the plans. Reviewing the plan determines if the contents will be useful at the time it is needed. Tool 5.2 provides a comprehensive checklist that can be used as an internal review tool prior to submitting the plan for external review. In addition, the FEMA Target Capabilities List for Evacuation and Sheltering-in-Place is included in its entirety as Appendix A to this document. Basic critique methods may be applied to the plan to determine if it will be effective and efficient. These methods measure if the plan is adequate, feasible, acceptable, complete, and in compliance. • The plan is adequate if it can accomplish the mission while under control. Have valid and reasonable assumptions. • The plan is feasible if the mission can be accomplished utilizing the resources within the allocated time allotted. • The plan is acceptable if it meets the require- ments driven by the threat or incident. It also is acceptable if it meets the costs and time limitations. Finally it is acceptable if it complies with all applicable laws, regulatory requirements, and standards. • The plan can be labeled complete if it: - Incorporates all tasks to be accomplished - Includes all required capabilities - Integrates the needs of the general populations, children under the age of 18, individuals with disabilities and other access and functional needs, immigrants, individuals with lim- ited English proficiency, and a diverse racial and ethnic population - Provides a complete picture of the sequence of events and the scope of the planned response - Provides time estimates for achieving objectives - Identifies criteria for success and the desired outcome expected • Once the plan is complete, it can also be considered compliant if it meets applicable laws and official and regulatory require- ments. The plan also needs to comply with state and federal standards. TASK 5.3 APPROVE AND MAINTAIN THE PLAN Obtaining senior officials’ approval through a formal promulgation documentation process is vital to ensuring that the plan will be effectively implemented at all levels. The chief executive of each agency must review and sign the plan. This process is based in specific statute, law, or ordinance, including the authority to call for a mandatory evacuation. Establish the authority and the formal process required for changes and modifications to the plan. Include a regular review and update of the plan as needed, ideally on an annual basis.

Page 115 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan Tool 5.3, Sample MOU with Transit Agency as Convener, and Tool 5.4, Sample Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) with Metropolitan Planning Organization or Other Regional Entity as Convener, provide example language for such agreements that can be amended as appropriate to fit the agreed-upon governing or coordinat- ing structure and operational agreements. In addition to an umbrella agreement or understanding among the main stakeholders and partners in the planning process, it is also advisable to develop MOUs and/or coordina- tion frameworks with others, such as: • Transportation counterparts in other locali- ties, such as across county or state lines • Transit counterparts in the region and in nearby and more distant jurisdictions • Medical transportation providers • Private sector transportation providers (the state or local Emergency Management Agency may elect to do this, but the lead transportation entity needs to know about it) • School bus operators or providers (the state or local Emergency Management Agency may elect to do this, but the lead transportation entity needs to know about it) • CBOs, FBOs, and NGOs • Private sector organizations that can provide support and supplies TASK 5.4 DISSEMINATE THE PLAN Once approved, the CAME or the emergency manager(s) will arrange to distribute the plan to those responsible for implementing it. Much of the evacuation plan will be a public document, because elements will need to be shared with non-governmental and faith-based organiza- tions, as well as other agencies, to help them understand their roles and to encourage them to participate in planning. Some elements, however, will be considered sensitive and should have appropriate standardized documented control processes in place, including account- ability for all copies. Secured electronic access is preferable, but portable hard copies may also be necessary in some cases. Determining which elements are public and which are sensitive can be decided during the development of the plan. For transportation and transit agencies that do not work regularly with emergency management, it is important to be aware of the Emergency Management Assistance Compact (EMAC). EMAC is a national interstate mutual aid agreement that enables states to share resources during times of disaster. Since the 104th Congress ratified the compact, EMAC has grown to become the nation’s system for providing mutual aid through operational procedures and protocols that have been validated through experience. EMAC is administered by NEMA, the National Emergency Management Association, headquartered in Lexington, Kentucky. EMAC complements the federal disaster response system, providing timely and cost-effective relief to states requesting assistance from assisting member states who understand the needs of jurisdictions that are struggling to preserve life, the economy, and the environment. EMAC can be used either in lieu of federal assistance or in conjunction with federal assistance, thus providing a “seamless” flow of needed goods and services to an impacted state. EMAC further provides another venue for mitigating resource deficiencies by ensuring maximum use of all available resources within member states’ inventories.

Page 116 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan TOOL 5.1, MULTIJURISDICTION MULTIMODAL EVACUATION COORDINATION TEMPLATE OUTLINE PURPOSE: Provide the framework for organizing the information gathered in Steps 1 through 4 into a formal plan. DIRECTIONS: This document presents the template outline for a Multijurisdictional Evacuation Plan. This annotated outline is used to prepare a multiregional evacuation plan. The collaborative planning and information gathering in Steps 1 through 4 in this guide provide the majority of the information needed to complete this template. Some of the items that are not covered, such as providing supplies to shelters, are the responsibilities of ESFs that are part of the collaborative planning team, and will have the information readily available. Though such items are outside the scope of this guide, which is focused on transportation coordination, such elements are part of a comprehensive Evacuation Plan. Refer to the checklists in Tool 5.2 for more detail for each item in the outline. STEP FIVE—TOOLS NCHRP 20-59 (32) A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation Tool 5.1, Multijurisdiction Multimodal Evacuation Coordination Template Outline Title: Regional Evacuation Coordination Plan for [insert region name] [Date] 1 Introduction 1.1 Purpose of Plan [This section provides a general synopsis of conditions under which an evacuation plan will be necessary.] • Definition of “evacuation” and brief description of scope of activities Multijurisdiction Multimodal Evacua- tion Coordination Template Outline This excerpt can be viewed in full on CRP-CD-132. • Purpose: why a multijurisdictional evacuation coordination plan is needed • Mission statement and objectives − Mission statement of organization or entity as it relates to preparing for and executing an evacuation [This organization could be the CAME from Step 1 or defer to agreed-upon language from the Memorandum of Understanding] − Establish metrics for performance and ongoing maintenance/updates of the plan 1.2 Scope [This section describes the extent of coverage of the evacuation plan.] 1.2.1 Geographic scope • Legal jurisdictions covered by plan • Geographically distinct areas of note covered by plan (e.g., floodplains) • Geographic areas of strategic concern outside the plan’s legal jurisdiction (e.g., neighboring city or state to which residents may be evacuated). Include all potential evacuation partners in the plan, including potential destination locations if possible, depending on interest, distance, and similar factors. 1.2.2 Potential evacuation populations • General populations and characteristics − Nighttime and daytime populations − Geographic distribution within plan’s jurisdiction • Transportation characteristics − Car ownership − Reliance on transit − Commuting patterns • Populations with access and functional needs [defined broadly] − Restricted mobility − Requiring medical support during transport and sheltering − Vision/hearing impairment − Other (foreign languages low literacy, etc.) Note: This template was adapted from the King County, Wash- ington, Evacuation Planning Template, which was designed for a single jurisdiction evacuation plan. The original template for Evacuation Plans and the Evacuation Templa e Overview and Evacuation Resources documents are available on-line at: http://www.kingcounty.gov/safety/prepare/ EmergencyManagementProfessionals/ Plans/EvacuationTemplate.aspx.

Page 117 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan TOOL 5.2, MULTIJURISDICTION MULTIMODAL EVACUATION PLANNING CHECKLISTS PURPOSE: The purpose of this tool is to facilitate the internal review of a re- gional evacuation plan prior to outside agency review. DIRECTIONS: This checklist was modified and expanded from the single-jurisdiction template developed by King County, Washington. The checklists are based on the premise that a regional coordinating entity has been established for multi-modal coordination for regional evacuations (along the lines of one of the CAME frameworks), and that the regional entity will be established through agreements between existing jurisdictional entities, and will likely have very limited powers within itself to establish regulations, compel evacuations or quarantines, or command substantial financial and staff resources. Its powers lie in its ability to coordinate information, communications, and resources at all stages of evacuation planning, mobilization, and reentry. If a regional entity for evacuation planning and response is established that does have greater authority and power than is assumed in these checklists, the checklists can be modified to reflect those powers. Likewise, the checklists can be tailored as necessary to reflect regional characteristics (e.g., substitute parish or borough for county.) STEP FIVE—TOOLS NCHRP 20-59 (32) A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation Tool 5.2, Multijurisdiction Multimodal Evacuation Planning Checklists 1.2 Plan Scope 1.2.1 Geographic Scope 1.2.1-A Determine if any of the information required for this section is available from existing jurisdiction plans or documents, e.g., CEMP. 1.2.1-B Identify the jurisdictions for which this evacuation plan is being written and to which it can be applied. Include maps as an appendix where appropriate. 1.2.1-C Identify geographic areas of your region that may require particular attention (e.g. floodplains) during an evacuation. Include maps as an appendix where appropriate. 1.2.1-D Identify jurisdiction(s) in the region beyond the legal scope of your region’s evacuation plan on which you might need to rely if an evacuation of your region occurs. Include maps as an appendix where appropriate. Examples include: ∙ Neighboring jurisdiction that may shelter your evacuees. ∙ Neighboring jurisdiction whose resources you may use. 1.2.1-E Identify relevant geographic zones within your region. Areas may include but are not limited to: ∙ Residential areas ∙ Industrial areas ∙ Commercial areas (high daytime population) ∙ - Arts or entertainment districts 1.2.2 Potential Evacuation Populations 1.2.2-A Determine if any of the information required for this section is available from existing jurisdiction plans or documents, e.g., CEMP. 1.2.2-B Determine the likely daytime populations for your region (by geographic zone). Daytime populations are likely to be higher in commercial areas where a major workforce is present. 1.2.2-C Determine the likely nighttime populations for your region (by geographic zone). Nighttime populations are likely to be higher in residential areas. 1.2.2-D Determine any seasonal populations for your region (by geographic zone), e.g., college/university students; migrant workers; tourists. 1.2.2-E Determine the likely distribution of your region’s population (by geographic zone). Pay particular attention to areas with high concentrations of people, e.g., large employment centers or shopping malls 1.2.2-F Determine the likely number of vehicles owned for each geographic zone within your region. ∙ Potential sources of information include planning department and U.S. census data. ∙ Use demographic data for vehicle ownership, commuting patterns, etc. 1.2.2-G Determine the percentage of the population in your region that relies on public transportation on a daily basis to travel to/from the area (by geographic zone). Note: Not all actions identifi d here are covered in earlier steps of Multijurisdiction Multimodal Evacu- this guide, since the guide up to this point has been focused on the ation Planning Checklists transportation aspects. However, the collaborative partners that have participated to this point will have the knowledge and resources This excerpt can be viewed in full on CRP-CD-132. to complete other actions. Refer to the Target Capabilities List for Evacuation and Sheltering-in-Place (Appendix A) to identify any support function partners that may be unclear for this checklist.

Page 118 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan TOOL 5.3, SAMPLE MOU WITH TRANSIT AGENCY AS CONVENER PURPOSE: Provide a starting point for dialog and negotiations for formalizing the plan in the event that a transportation or transit agency is the convener for the CAME. DIRECTIONS: Consider with your collaborative planning group whether this type of framework for jurisdictional coordination would be appropriate. If so, modify the language as appropriate for your region. STEP FIVE—TOOLS EXAMPLE: A MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING BETWEEN [LOCAL PUBLIC SAFETY AGENCY] AND [LOCAL TRANSIT AGENCY] PURPOSE This Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) is intended to document the intention of the [local transit agency] and [local public safety agency] to work together, on a continuing and lasting basis, toward maximum cooperation and mutual assistance in the areas of disaster response and emergency preparedness. To the maximum extent possible, the parties will develop joint programs for planning, training, conducting exercises, and responding to disasters impacting [local transit agency] and/or [local public safety agency] or the community served by both agencies. Specifically, this MOU will address: The development of a mutual aid agreement between [local transit agency] and [local public safety agency] in the event of disasters, natural or manmade, that overwhelm the capabilities of either. The development of a joint exercise that requires the response of both entities in responding to disasters such as, but not limited to, an oil spill to the environment. The development of a coordinated response in event of terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction within [local transit agency] or community served by [local public safety agency] and in accordance with the Homeland Security Domestic Preparedness Program.

Page 119 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan MUTUAL AID AGREEMENT The state of [name of state] authorizes the state and its political subdivisions to develop and enter into mutual aid agreements for reciprocal emergency aid in case of emergencies too extensive to be dealt with effectively unassisted. It is in the best interest of the citizens of [name of community] for [local public transit agency to enter into such a mutual aid agreement with [local public safety agency] to provide for expeditious emergency assistance, resources permitting, in the event of a catastrophic event or natural disaster in the city and/or surrounding county. [Local transit agency] desires to provide reciprocal assistance to [local public safety agency], resources permitting, in the event of a natural or man-made disaster. Mutual Aid Agreements provide the mechanism that enhances and leverages existing capabilities. The process for creating a Mutual Aid Agreement between [local tran- sit agency] and [local public safety agency] begins with: • Establishing a working group. This group will review current local, state, and federal laws to clearly identify any limitations to how each party will provide assistance during emergencies. • Writing a draft agreement (unless the law says otherwise) including the terms of the agreement, the participating parties, period of assistance, definitions of disasters or emergencies, and designating an authorized representative who can execute the agreement. The agreement will do the following: • Identify available services and resources, with some specific reference to the type of resources that can and cannot be used. Limitations also will be spelled out, to ensure the resources are not exhausted. • Identify exactly how to request assistance, for instance, the "trigger" for a request-a local emergency or disaster declaration. • Explain how the agency will request and what the expected committed response would be. • Identify who can make the request, and whether it will be written or oral. If possible, a form will be developed clearly explaining what is needed and for what length of time. • Define operational procedures and explain who will maintain control of the resources provided and who will provide required maintenance for any equipment made available. • Make provisions for any food, housing, or communications support required for personnel who respond to an emergency or disaster. • Define reimbursable expenses, including personnel, material, and equipment costs and for replacing damaged or destroyed equipment.

Page 120 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan JOINT EVACUATION EXERCISE [Local transit agency] and [local public safety agency] intend to test capabilities and limitations of both entities in responding to a [hazardous chemical spill] [hurricane] requiring evacuation response actions during a joint exercise in FY [20]. An Exercise Planning Team comprising representatives from [local public safety agency]; [local transit agency]; and the [city/county] Emergency Operations Center will: • Define the type of exercise, develop an exercise scenario, and ensure active participation by [local transit agency] and [local public safety agency] response organizations. • Identify a list of key entities that will have responsibility for developing, controlling, and participating in the exercise. • Identify resources for developing and conducting the exercise. • Establish a timeline for keeping such an approach on track. • Conduct the exercise. • Review the lessons learned from the exercise and incorpo- rate them into future response and exercise plans. DOMESTIC PREPAREDNESS [IF APPLICABLE] [Local transit agency] serves one of the 120 cities selected by the U.S. Department of Defense to receive extensive training to prepare the community for the potential of a terrorist attack using weapons of mass destruction. The U.S. Army Chemical and Biological Command [conducted/will conduct] this training during the period [identify date]. [Local public safety agency] participated in this training with [local transit agency]. [Local transit agency] will continue to coordinate development of its Domestic Preparedness Program with [local public safety agency]. Specifically, [local public safety agency] will: • Coordinate with [local transit agency] on its plans for responding to terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction planning and operations. • Encourage transit first responders to participate in training offered by the [local public safety agency]. • Invite [local transit agency] to participate in the development and conduct of the Biological Attack Tabletop Exercise and other follow-up exercises. • Collaborate with [local transit agency] in the purchase of response, detection, and decontamination equipment for incidents involving terrorist use of nuclear, biological, or chemical agents to ensure the right mix of equipment is available for responding to such incidents. • Provide reciprocal support, resources permitting, to [local transit agency] in the event of an incident on an agency vehicle or in an agency facility.

Page 121 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan AGREEMENT MODIFICATION PROCESS Modifications to this agreement may be presented at any time and shall be mutually agreed upon in writing after joint discussions involving both parties. This Agreement shall become effective when executed by both parties and shall remain in effect for a period of five (5) years, and shall automatically be renewed for successive five (5) years periods unless terminated by either party upon sixty (60) days prior written notice. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties' authorized officers have executed this Agreement on the date first above written.

Page 122 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan TOOL 5.4, SAMPLE AGREEMENT WITH A METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION (MPO) AS CONVENER PURPOSE: Provide a starting point for dialog and negotiations for formalizing the plan in the event that an MPO or other regional agency is the convener. DIRECTIONS: Consider with your collaborative planning group whether this type of framework for jurisdictional coordination would be appropriate. If so, modify the language as appropriate for your region. STEP FIVE—TOOLS EXAMPLE: ADDENDUM TO REGION EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE COMPACT BETWEEN [METROPOLITAN PLANNING ORGANIZATION (MPO) NAME] OR [OTHER REGIONAL ENTITY NAME] FOR [NAMED JURISDICTIONS] CONCERNING [MPO/OTHER] REGIONAL PROTECTIVE ACTION COORDINATION AGREEMENT On [date], member jurisdictions of the [MPO/Other] entered into an agreement to provide mutual aid in the event of a regional emergency. This Addendum to the original agreement covers the coordination of protective actions during a major emergency. ARTICLE 1 PURPOSE The purpose of this agreement is to ensure that protective actions are coordinated regionally in a major emergency that affects multiple jurisdictions in the [MPO/Other] area. This agreement addresses specific elements of a regional response that require multijurisdictional coordination to effectively protect the public in a severe, widespread, or prolonged emergency. These elements include command and management, communications, public information and warning, evacuation, and reception and shelter. This agreement builds upon the existing [MPO/ Other] Region Emergency Assistance Compact (REAC) [if applicable, insert exact name].

Page 123 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan ARTICLE 2 LIMITATIONS This agreement does not create a regional command structure, and it does not infringe on each jurisdiction’s statutory authority to exercise command and control. ARTICLE 3 COORDINATION A major man-made or natural disaster that directly impacts multiple jurisdictions will require local governments to work closely together and with the State to share information, make decisions, implement protective actions, and deploy resources. Furthermore, due to the interconnectedness of the [MPO] area, a disaster that directly impacts a single jurisdiction will still likely have a regional impact, and will require regional coordination. In a regional emergency, all members, therefore, agree to coordinate their response as follows: 1. Command and Management • Local EOCs will coordinate protective action decisions with each other and with the State EOC. • Local EOCs will coordinate assignment of available re- sources with each other and with the State EOC. • Jurisdictions will notify potentially impacted neighboring jurisdictions of any protective actions before they are implemented or as soon as practical. • Local jurisdictions and the state will employ the concepts and terminology of the National Incident Management System. 2. Communications • Jurisdictions will maintain continuous communication with each other and the state via emer- gency management software systems, interoperable radio systems, telephone, and other means. • Jurisdictions and the state will post status reports on common use software systems as soon as practical. • The State EOC will facilitate the flow of information between local jurisdictions to the extent necessary. 3. Public Information and Warning • Local jurisdictions will each establish Joint Information Systems (JIS) to manage the dissemination of information and instructions to the public. • Dissemination of emergency public information and instructions will be coordinated between jurisdictions through a “Regional Joint Information System” to ensure that citizens receive timely, accurate, and consistent information across jurisdictions. • Evacuation.

Page 124 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan • Traffic evacuation measures will be preplanned and coordinated be- tween local EOCs and the State EOC, and between local transporta- tion departments and the [state] Department of Transportation. • Local jurisdictions and the state will coordinate and pre-plan potential counterflow routes. • When a jurisdiction establishes counterflow operations or closes a road, all juris- dictions’ EOCs will be notified and status reports will be posted regularly. 4. Reception and Shelter • All jurisdictions will pre-identify facilities that can be used for reception centers and/or shelters. • All jurisdictions will identify and train staff to operate reception centers and/or shelters. • All jurisdictions will coordinate the provision and distribution of avail- able supplies for reception centers and/or shelters. • All jurisdictions will establish reception centers and/or shelters as necessary. • Reception centers and shelters will be open to citizens of all jurisdictions. ARTICLE 4 IMPLEMENTATION 1. Plans and Procedures • The [Title of Agreement] establishes regional coordination concepts for pre- paredness, response, and recovery; contains procedural guidance; and pro- vides information to better coordinate regional protective actions. • Each jurisdiction agrees to incorporate in its plans and procedures, to the maximum extent feasible, the concepts included in this agreement and the [Title of Document.] 2. Training and Exercises • Each jurisdiction will ensure that the appropriate personnel in public safety and re- lated disciplines are familiar with this agreement and the attached guidelines. • Jurisdictions will conduct joint training to improve the region’s ability to execute the functions that comprise this agreement and the attached guidelines. • Jurisdictions and the state will conduct a joint exercise at least annually to test and improve regional coordination procedures and systems. • Jurisdictions and the state will review after action reports from actual events and exercises to revise plans. 3. Revisions This Agreement may be amended only when jurisdictions or agencies/depart- ments that are parties to the agreement, mutually agree in writing.

Page 125 Step 5 - Prepare, Review, and Approve Plan Signature Page We, the undersigned, confirm the concepts and commitments contained in this agree- ment. We will direct the participation of our jurisdictions and agencies in con- tinued regional planning to implement the provisions of this agreement. [Identify all participants in the plan by name and title including local, county, and state representatives. This will usually include mayors, county executives, state emergency manager, state department of transportation, and possibly one or more governors, depending on the geographic scope of the plan.]

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 740: A Transportation Guide for All-Hazards Emergency Evacuation focuses on the transportation aspects of evacuation, particularly large-scale, multijurisdictional evacuation.

The guidance, strategies, and tools in NCHRP Report 740 are based on an all-hazards approach that has applicability to a wide range of “notice” and “no-notice” emergency events. The report follows the basic planning steps of the Federal Emergency Management Agency’s Comprehensive Preparedness Guide (CPG) 101. Each chapter parallels one of the six main CPG steps. Each chapter is further subdivided into smaller, discrete tasks, with cross-references to tools--such as templates or checklists--that are shown at the end of each chapter and are on a CD-ROM included with the print version of the report.

The CD-ROM is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

The contractor’s final report, which documents the development of the report, was published as NCHRP Web-Only Document 196. A PowerPoint presentation describing the entire project that resulted in NCHRP Report 740 is available for download.

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CD-ROM Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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