National Academies Press: OpenBook
Page i
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R1
Page ii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R2
Page iii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R3
Page iv
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R4
Page v
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R5
Page vi
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22716.
×
Page R6

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

N A T I O N A L C O O P E R A T I V E H I G H W A Y R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M NCHRP REPORT 729 Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running Kimberly A. Eccles Rebecca Fiedler Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, inc. Raleigh, NC Bhagwant Persaud Craig Lyon Persaud and lyon, inc. Toronto, Ontario, Canada Glenn Hansen traffic safety solutions Ellicott City, MD Subscriber Categories Operations and Traffic Management • Safety and Human Factors TRANSPORTAT ION RESEARCH BOARD WASHINGTON, D.C. 2012 www.TRB.org Research sponsored by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration

NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM Systematic, well-designed research provides the most effective approach to the solution of many problems facing highway administrators and engineers. Often, highway problems are of local interest and can best be studied by highway departments individually or in cooperation with their state universities and others. However, the accelerating growth of highway transportation develops increasingly complex problems of wide interest to highway authorities. These problems are best studied through a coordinated program of cooperative research. In recognition of these needs, the highway administrators of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials initiated in 1962 an objective national highway research program employing modern scientific techniques. This program is supported on a continuing basis by funds from participating member states of the Association and it receives the full cooperation and support of the Federal Highway Administration, United States Department of Transportation. The Transportation Research Board of the National Academies was requested by the Association to administer the research program because of the Board’s recognized objectivity and understanding of modern research practices. The Board is uniquely suited for this purpose as it maintains an extensive committee structure from which authorities on any highway transportation subject may be drawn; it possesses avenues of communications and cooperation with federal, state and local governmental agencies, universities, and industry; its relationship to the National Research Council is an insurance of objectivity; it maintains a full-time research correlation staff of specialists in highway transportation matters to bring the findings of research directly to those who are in a position to use them. The program is developed on the basis of research needs identified by chief administrators of the highway and transportation departments and by committees of AASHTO. Each year, specific areas of research needs to be included in the program are proposed to the National Research Council and the Board by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials. Research projects to fulfill these needs are defined by the Board, and qualified research agencies are selected from those that have submitted proposals. Administration and surveillance of research contracts are the responsibilities of the National Research Council and the Transportation Research Board. The needs for highway research are many, and the National Cooperative Highway Research Program can make significant contributions to the solution of highway transportation problems of mutual concern to many responsible groups. The program, however, is intended to complement rather than to substitute for or duplicate other highway research programs. Published reports of the NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM are available from: Transportation Research Board Business Office 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 and can be ordered through the Internet at: http://www.national-academies.org/trb/bookstore Printed in the United States of America NCHRP REPORT 729 Project 03-93 ISSN 0077-5614 ISBN 978-0-309-25843-2 Library of Congress Control Number 2012943214 © 2012 National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, FAA, FHWA, FMCSA, FTA, or Transit Development Corporation endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. NOTICE The project that is the subject of this report was a part of the National Cooperative Highway Research Program, conducted by the Transportation Research Board with the approval of the Governing Board of the National Research Council. The members of the technical panel selected to monitor this project and to review this report were chosen for their special competencies and with regard for appropriate balance. The report was reviewed by the technical panel and accepted for publication according to procedures established and overseen by the Transportation Research Board and approved by the Governing Board of the National Research Council. The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research and are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board, the National Research Council, or the program sponsors. The Transportation Research Board of the National Academies, the National Research Council, and the sponsors of the National Cooperative Highway Research Program do not endorse products or manufacturers. Trade or manufacturers’ names appear herein solely because they are considered essential to the object of the report.

The National Academy of Sciences is a private, nonprofit, self-perpetuating society of distinguished scholars engaged in scientific and engineering research, dedicated to the furtherance of science and technology and to their use for the general welfare. On the authority of the charter granted to it by the Congress in 1863, the Academy has a mandate that requires it to advise the federal government on scientific and technical matters. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone is president of the National Academy of Sciences. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964, under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences, as a parallel organization of outstanding engineers. It is autonomous in its administration and in the selection of its members, sharing with the National Academy of Sciences the responsibility for advising the federal government. The National Academy of Engineering also sponsors engineering programs aimed at meeting national needs, encourages education and research, and recognizes the superior achievements of engineers. Dr. Charles M. Vest is president of the National Academy of Engineering. The Institute of Medicine was established in 1970 by the National Academy of Sciences to secure the services of eminent members of appropriate professions in the examination of policy matters pertaining to the health of the public. The Institute acts under the responsibility given to the National Academy of Sciences by its congressional charter to be an adviser to the federal government and, on its own initiative, to identify issues of medical care, research, and education. Dr. Harvey V. Fineberg is president of the Institute of Medicine. The National Research Council was organized by the National Academy of Sciences in 1916 to associate the broad community of science and technology with the Academy’s purposes of furthering knowledge and advising the federal government. Functioning in accordance with general policies determined by the Academy, the Council has become the principal operating agency of both the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering in providing services to the government, the public, and the scientific and engineering communities. The Council is administered jointly by both Academies and the Institute of Medicine. Dr. Ralph J. Cicerone and Dr. Charles M. Vest are chair and vice chair, respectively, of the National Research Council. The Transportation Research Board is one of six major divisions of the National Research Council. The mission of the Transporta- tion Research Board is to provide leadership in transportation innovation and progress through research and information exchange, conducted within a setting that is objective, interdisciplinary, and multimodal. The Board’s varied activities annually engage about 7,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. The program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individu- als interested in the development of transportation. www.TRB.org www.national-academies.org

C O O P E R A T I V E R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M S AuTHOR ACkNOWLEDGMENTS The authors would like to acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals who provided information for this effort: •• Officer Brian Walters, PhotoSafe Coordinator, Virginia Beach Police Department, Virginia Beach, Virginia. •• Officer James Barnes Jr., Public Relations/Marketing, Virginia Beach Police Department, Virginia Beach, Virginia. •• Mike Shahsiah, Senior Traffic Engineer, City of Virginia Beach, Virginia Beach, Virginia. •• Sergeant Todd Davis, Portland Police Bureau, Portland, Oregon. •• Officer Frolov, Portland Police Bureau, Portland, Oregon. •• Robert M. Burchfield, City Traffic Engineer, Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland, Oregon. •• Greg Raisman, Community and School Traffic Safety Partnership, Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland, Oregon. •• Peter Koonce, Portland Bureau of Transportation, Portland, Oregon. •• Vincent Parke, Northwest Regional Program Manager, ACS, Portland, Oregon. •• Jon Hannasch, Associate Traffic Engineer, City of San Diego, San Diego, California. •• Sergeant Joel McMurrin, San Diego Police Department, San Diego, California. •• Melissa D. Ables, Deputy City Attorney, San Diego, California. •• Asif Iqbal, City of Edmonton Office of Traffic Safety, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. •• Gerry Shimko, City of Edmonton Office of Traffic Safety, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. •• Lindsay Yarmon, City of Edmonton Office of Traffic Safety, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. •• Rajna Tufegdzic, City of Edmonton Office of Traffic Safety, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. •• Stevanus Tjandra, City of Edmonton Office of Traffic Safety, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. CRP STAFF FOR NCHRP REPORT 729 Christopher W. Jenks, Director, Cooperative Research Programs Crawford F. Jencks, Deputy Director, Cooperative Research Programs David Reynaud, Senior Program Officer Megan A. Chamberlain, Senior Program Assistant Eileen P. Delaney, Director of Publications Hilary Freer, Senior Editor NCHRP PROjECT 03-93 PANEL Field of Traffic—Area of Operations and Control Richard Retting, Sam Schwartz Engineering, Fairfax, VA (Chair) Larry Caldwell, III, Retired—Virginia DOT, Mechanicsville, VA Denise Marie Inda, Nevada DOT, Carson City, NV Barbara J. Jones, City of Toledo Retired, Perrysburg, OH Margaret Moore, Texas DOT, Austin, TX John B. Townsend, AAA Mid-Atlantic, Washington, DC Keith D. Williams, FHWA Liaison Brian Chodrow, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Liaison Hector Williams, Jr., National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Liaison Richard Pain, TRB Liaison

This report provides guidelines for the start-up and operation of automated enforce- ment programs to reduce speeding and red light running in an effort to improve highway safety. The guidelines are based on a comprehensive, national review of both ongoing and terminated programs. This report will be of interest to highway traffic and safety engineers, enforcement agencies, and elected officials. There is a major national emphasis on highway safety and the attainment of aggressive reductions in traffic fatalities. Two significant factors in fatal crashes are speeding and red light running. Technologies have been developed to automatically detect these and other traffic violations. In 2004, the AASHTO Board of Directors passed a policy resolution to support greater use of automated traffic enforcement. Implementation of these technolo- gies has grown to the point that studies of best practices and research on their effectiveness can provide valuable information for state and local jurisdictions contemplating automated traffic enforcement. Under NCHRP Project 03-93, Vanasse Hangen Brustlin, Inc., undertook an effort to pre- pare a comprehensive assessment of automated speeding and red light enforcement activity in the United States, and develop guidelines to ensure successful operation of current and future programs. They (1) developed an inventory of currently operating and terminated U.S. automated enforcement programs; (2) conducted a critical review of the literature on automated enforcement; (3) reviewed, summarized, and constructed a matrix of existing State and local legal requirements for initiating and operating an automated enforcement program; and (4) conducted case studies of four successful programs. The best practices and lessons learned from this information were used to develop guidelines for success- ful implementation and operation of current and future programs. These guidelines were submitted to stakeholders for review and comment. The resulting guidelines recommend that a program should be open to the public, be motivated by safety concerns, have strong enabling legislation, and be repeatable to achieve success. F O R E W O R D By David Reynaud Staff Officer Transportation Research Board

1 Summary 3 Chapter 1 Background 3 Introduction 4 Study Objectives and Scope 5 Chapter 2 Research Approach 5 Phase I 6 Phase II 8 Chapter 3 Guidelines for Automated Enforcement 8 Purpose of Guidelines 8 Problem Identification 9 Planning 14 Enforcement and Lead Agency 14 Agency Collaboration 14 Staffing of Program Personnel 15 Public Education 16 Warning Period 16 Vendor Contract and Payment 17 Fines 18 Camera Installation 20 Violation Data Collection and Adjudication 21 Program Monitoring 22 Problem Intervention 23 Resource Requirements 24 Chapter 4 Conclusions and Recommendations 24 Gaps in Data 27 Recommendations 28 References 29 Acronyms and Abbreviations 30 Appendix H Case Studies C O N T E N T S Note: Many of the photographs, figures, and tables in this report have been converted from color to grayscale for printing. The electronic version of the report (posted on the Web at www.trb.org) retains the color versions.

Next: Summary »
Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running Get This Book
×
 Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running
Buy Paperback | $52.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Report 729: Automated Enforcement for Speeding and Red Light Running includes guidelines designed to help transportation agencies start-up and operate automated enforcement programs to improve highway safety by reducing speeding and red light running.

Appendices A through G to NCHRP Report 729 are available in electronic versions only. The appendices are not available in the PDF or print version of the report.

TR News 292: May-June 2014 includes an article about the report.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!