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Page 479
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
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Page 479
Page 480
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
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Page 480
Page 481
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 481
Page 482
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 482
Page 483
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 483
Page 484
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 484
Page 485
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 485
Page 486
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 486
Page 487
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 487
Page 488
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 488
Page 489
Suggested Citation:"Photo Gallery." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2012. Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition: Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22791.
×
Page 489

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Cyclist on a “Bikeway” (a.k.a., bicycle boulevard) in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada, illustrating a vehicle traffic diverter, bike cut- through, and arterial-crossing bicycle and pedestrian refuges Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Carl Sundstrom, photographer A state highway semi-mid-block (“T” intersection) signalized pedes- trian crossing in combination with a pedestrian passageway provide town center access in Silver Spring, Maryland Dick Pratt, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY 16-479

16-480 Minneapolis Skyway and Nicollet Mall activity in a downtown core area where total pedestrian flows have crept upward on average for nearly half a century Courtesy of Metropolitan Council, St. Paul, MN, Jeff Syme, photographer An elementary school “Walking School Bus” in Montreal, with children grasping a cord held front and back by responsible adults Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Dan Burden, photographer

16-481 In Montgomery County, MD, the on-road bike route, which parallels the trail (bot- tom) sees mostly avid cyclists Dick Pratt, photographer In Montgomery County, MD, the trail, which parallels the on-road bike route (top), is used by walkers, joggers, bicyclists-in-training, and more casual cyclists in general Dick Pratt, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY

16-482 ADA-compliant bus stops and adjoining sidewalk sections have been found in Maryland, in specific cases, to allow cost-effective reductions in special ADA- mandated paratransit services Dick Pratt, photographer The easterly sidewalk branch seen here on the right follows a former dirt path traced by Washington Metro passengers seeking directness in their walk to/from Grosvenor-Strathmore Station Dick Pratt, photographer

16-483 Conventional bike lanes along the Embarcadero are part of a City of San Francisco program that has seen bicycle count increases averaging some 70 percent on individ- ual streets studied Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Dan Burden, photographer A singular facility extension example is the “Downtown Trail” continuation of Florida’s west coast Pinellas Trail through central St. Petersburg to Tampa Bay via the 1st Avenue South cycle track Dick Pratt, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY

16-484 Manhattan’s elevated “High Line” rail trail is a classic example of a spectacular facil- ity whose users are likely seeking “direct-benefit” enjoyment and exercise more than derived-benefit travel Courtesy of Robert Pratt, photographer Trail orientation affects which travel purposes are effectively served—the alignment of Florida’s Pinellas Trail through several downtowns attracts relatively high use for commuting Dick Pratt, photographer

16-485 The highly varied weekend traffic mix on the Capital Crescent Trail in Bethesda, MD, illustrates off-road path openness to multiple activities by users of all ages and capabilities Dick Pratt, photographer Improvement of MD 547, providing ADA-compliant sidewalks on both sides instead of a degraded walk on one side, was associated with nearly a 70 percent total pedes- trian count increase Dick Pratt, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY

16-486 This Mesa, AZ, multi-use path signage illustrates well the variety of uses generally allowed on U.S. “bicycle” paths and trails Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Jim Hash, photographer Pedestrian and bicycle bridges on paths, if well connected like this Pinellas Trail bridging of Central Avenue in St. Petersburg, FL, can serve both local access and longer through trips Dick Pratt, photographer

16-487 Bike racks such as these in Madison, WI, are preferred by potential cyclists over no parking at all but appear to rank lower than secure covered parking Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Eric Lowry, photographer This Durham, NH, streetscape illustrates pedestrian-friendly features such as store placement directly at the back of the broad sidewalk Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Dan Burden, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY

16-488 An “interested” participant receives an information packet as part of the 2008 Bellingham Smart Trips individualized marketing project Courtesy of Socialdata GmbH and Whatcom Council of Governments, Bellingham, WA Bicycling on quiet streets, including bicycle boulevards, is attractive to most user groups but especially female cyclists Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Adam Darin, photographer

16-489 “Hawk Signals” are among the “active when present” traffic control devices being applied in an effort to reduce dangers of multiple-threat situations at marked but uncontrolled multi-lane crossings Courtesy of www.pedbikeimages.org, Mike Cynecki, photographer PHO TO G ALLERY

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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Report 95: Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook, Third Edition; Chapter 16, Pedestrian and Bicycle Facilities examines pedestrian and bicyclist behavior and travel demand outcomes in a relatively broad sense.

The report covers traveler response to non-motorized transportation (NMT) facilities both in isolation and as part of the total urban fabric, along with the effects of associated programs and promotion. The report looks not only at transportation outcomes, but also recreational and public health outcomes.

TCRP Report 95, Chapter 16 focuses on the travel behavior and public health implications of pedestrian/bicycle area-wide systems; NMT-link facilities such as sidewalks, bicycle lanes, and on-transit accommodation of bicycles; and node-specific facilities such as street-crossing treatments, bicycle parking, and showers.

The report also includes discussion of the implications of pedestrian and bicycle “friendly” neighborhoods, policies, programs, and promotion.

The report is complemented by illustrative photographs provided as a “Photo Gallery” at the conclusion of the report. In addition, PowerPoint slides of the photographs are available for download..

The Traveler Response to Transportation System Changes Handbook consists of these Chapter 1 introductory materials and 15 stand-alone published topic area chapters. Each topic area chapter provides traveler response findings including supportive information and interpretation, and also includes case studies and a bibliography consisting of the references utilized as sources.

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