National Academies Press: OpenBook

Sustainable Airport Construction Practices (2011)

Chapter: Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection

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Page 7
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Page 7
Page 8
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Page 8
Page 9
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
Page 9
Page 10
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
Page 10
Page 11
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 - Organization of the Collection." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
Page 11

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

For ease of use, the Collection is presented in two formats: Construction Practice Category and Construction Implementation Stage Category. The user should select one format to initiate their search, as the same information is presented in both presentation formats. The user may choose the appropriate presentation format based on preference and relative experience with construction and/or sustainability practices. 4.1 Construction Practice Categories The first presentation format of the Collection is by Construction Practice Category. A con- struction practice category identifies common elements of any construction project, necessary to fulfill the requirements of a design specification. The Collection’s sustainable construction practices are divided into seven Construction Practice categories as presented in Figure 2. These categories were created by analyzing the compiled practices and logically determining construction practice categories based on elements common to most construction projects. Each of the seven main organizational categories listed above was further divided into subcategories, as shown in Table 1. 4.2 Construction Implementation Stage Categories The second presentation format of the Collection is by Construction Implementation Stage Category. A construction implementation stage category identifies the typical project phase in which the practice would occur. The three construction implementation stage categories are: • Pre-construction—129 practices; • During construction—360 practices; and • Commissioning/Post-construction—23 practices. Most of the researched sustainable practices are relevant to one of the three defined construction implementation stages. However, a few practices are relevant to more than one implementation stage, such as the practice of monitoring stormwater quality pre-, during, and post-construction. These practices appear in more than one construction implementation stage category to prevent users from overlooking potentially applicable practices. Therefore, the total number of practices in the Collection appears to be larger (512 vs. 480) when organized by construction implemen- tation stage category than by construction practice category. Each of the three construction implementation stage categories listed above was further divided into subcategories, as shown in Table 2. 7 C H A P T E R 4 Organization of the Collection

4.3 Additional Filterable Criteria Primarily designed to be used as a Microsoft Excel-based database, as explained further in Chapter 5, the Collection can be viewed, filtered, and organized to meet particular areas of interest using the “filter” function. In addition to being able to filter based on construction practice or construction implementation stage category, the database can be filtered by the subcategories shown on Table 1 and Table 2. This functionality enables users of the Collection to conduct a filtered search on specific areas of interest in addition to, or in lieu of, filtering by construction practice category or construction implementation stage category. Practices related to multiple subcategories are listed in all categories that apply to prevent potentially applicable practices from being overlooked. For example, the first group of filterable subcategories within the construction implementation stage presentation format, “Policies, Contracts, and Specification,” includes subcategories of sustainable construction practices related to: • Sustainability goals; • Plans; • Requests for proposals/requests for qualifications; • Training and human resources; • Meetings; • Marketing and community outreach; • Construction worker health and safety; and • Compliance/performance monitoring. 8 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Source: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Sustainable Construction Practices Surface Transportation - 45 practices Reuse and Recycling Materials - 55 practices Sustainable Materials - 136 practices Policies and Regulations - 68 practices Construction Methods -125 practices Logistics - 10 practices Equipment - 41 practices Figure 2. Construction practice categories and number of practices in Collection.

1) Policies and Regulations 2) Construction Methods 3) Logistics 4) Equipment 5) Surface Transportation 6) Reuse and Recycling Materials 7) Sustainable Materials A) Policies, Procedures, and Plans A) Scheduling and Sequencing A) Scheduling A) Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy A) Construction Vehicles A) Construction Waste Management A) Recycled Content B) Sustainability Meetings, Teams, and Presentations B) Planning for Deconstruction and Disassembly B) Packaging and Delivery Methods B) Lighting i. Emissions Reduction i. Goals and Policies B) Local/Regional Materials C) Community Outreach C) Noise and Acoustical Quality C) Systems Commissioning ii. Reduced Vehicle Idling ii. Storage and Collection of Recyclables C) Rapidly Renewable Materials D) Human Resources D) Site Disturbance Minimization D) Maintenance iii. Construction Traffic Control iii. Materials Reuse D) Pavements and Building Structures E) Health and Safety i. Compliance and Safety B) Alternative Transportation iv. Salvaged Materials and Resources E) Roofing Materials i. Construction Worker Protection ii. Water Quality Protection i. Public Transportation Access and Carpooling B) Office Waste Reduction F) Foundations ii. Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control iii. Erosion and Sedimentation Control ii. Bicycle Access/Usage G) Building Interiors iv. Tree and Plant Protection H) Electrical Materials E) Indoor Air Quality I) Polymer Concrete Surface Sy stems i. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management J) Low-Emitting Materials ii. Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control K) Certified Wood F) Dust Control L) Wood Preservatives G) Water/Wastewater i. Reduce Potable Water Usage ii. Water Use Reduction iii. Stormwater Management and Treatment Source: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Table 1. Construction practice subcategories.

10 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices 1) Pre-Construction 2) During Construction 3) Commissioning / Post-Construction A) Policies, Contracts, and Specifications A) Policies and Regulations A) Systems Commissioning i. Sustainability Goals i. Sustainability Training and Tracking B) Indoor Air Quality ii. Plans ii. Community Outreach C) Community Outreach and Sustainability Accomplishments iii. Requests for Proposals/Request for Qualifications iii. Health and Safety iv. Training and Human Resources iv. Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) Control v. Meetings B) Construction Methods vi. Marketing and Community Outreach i. Scheduling and Sequencing vii. Construction Worker Health and Safety ii. Deconstruction/Disassembly viii. Compliance/Performance Monitoring C) Site Disturbance Minimization B) Initial Project Scheduling i. Compliance and Safety i. General ii. Water Quality Protection C) Deconstruction/Demolition iii. Erosion and Sedimentation Control i. Planning for Future Use iv. Tree and Plant Protection D) Indoor Air Quality i. Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management ii. Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control E) Dust Control K) i. General i. Recycled Content F) Water/Wastewater ii. Local/Regional Materials i. Reduce Potable Water Use iii. Rapidly Renewable Materials ii. Water Use Reduction iv. Pavements and Building Structures iii. Stormwater Management and Treatment v. Roofing Materials G) Logistics vi. Foundations i. Scheduling vii. Building Interiors ii. Packaging/Delivery Methods viii. Electrical Materials H) Construction Vehicles and Equipment ix. Polymer Concrete Surface Systems i. Noise Minimization and Monitoring x. Low-Emitting Materials ii. Vehicle Emissions Reduction xi. Wood iii. Reduced Vehicle Idling iv. Energy Efficiency v. Lighting vi. Maintenance I) Alternative Transportation i. Public Transportation Access and Carpooling ii. Bicycle Access/Usage J) Construction Waste Management i. Goals and Policies ii. Storage and Collection of Recyclables iii. Materials Reuse iv. Salvaged Materials and Resources Source: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Prepared by: Ricondo & Associates, Inc., May 2010. Sustainable Materials Table 2. Construction implementation stage subcategories. “Potential LEED Applicability” is also included as a filterable criterion so that users can con- duct a search for sustainable construction practices related to LEED credits (U.S. Green Build- ing Council 2009). The criterion does not guarantee that performance of the sustainable construction practice will achieve LEED credits; rather, the criterion indicates practices related to the LEED rating system so that users who may be pursuing LEED certification would be able to locate practices that are relevant to the LEED process or could assist in achieving LEED cred- its. More specifically, Applicable LEED Credit is also included as a filterable criterion so that users can search for sustainable construction practices related to particular LEED credits.

4.4 Additional Nonfilterable Information Provided with each sustainable construction practice included in the Collection is informa- tion about the source of the sustainable construction practice, whether it be from a particular document included in the literature review or one of the interviews conducted as part of the research process. Some sustainable construction practices may appear in more than one document considered in the literature review; however, the source most frequently used by practitioners in the field was included in the Collection. If data was available, sustainable construction practices in the Collection also include the airport(s) where the practice has been implemented. Provided with each sustainable construc- tion practice included in the Collection is a brief assessment (where applicable) of the economic, operational, natural resource/environmental, and/or social considerations that should be under- stood prior to implementation. Organization of the Collection 11

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 42: Sustainable Airport Construction Practices explores a set of best practices, methods, procedures, and materials that if implemented during construction may have a sustainable, positive economic, operational, environmental, or social effect.

The report includes the collection of sustainable airport construction practices in a searchable, filterable spreadsheet format on a CD-ROM, which is packaged with the report.

The CD-ROM included as part of ACRP Report 42 is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

Help on Burning an .ISO CD-ROM Image

Download the .ISO CD-ROM Image(Warning: This is a large file that may take some time to download using a high-speed connection.)

CD-ROM Disclaimer - This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences or the Transportation Research Board (collectively “TRB’) be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operations of this product. TRB makes no representation or warrant of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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