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Sustainable Airport Construction Practices (2011)

Chapter: Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2011. Sustainable Airport Construction Practices. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/22925.
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A-1 A P P E N D I X A Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories

A -2 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. Sustainable construction practices organized by construction practice category. LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Policies and Regulations Policies, Procedures, and Plans Create and follow a sustainable vision/mission statement that incorporates construction practices. Widely varies on detail and goals. Establishes that a project/airport has an environmental focus. Determined by goals. May have operational and/or cost implications. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 2 Establish an airport-specific rating/ranking system in conjunction with the airport sustainability guidance manual. Provide rewards (certificates of achievement, financial incentives, etc.) for contractors who meet and or exceed sustainability goals. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Could be tied to cost savings generated by applied practices. Helps achieve environmental objectives. Encourages other contractors to improve their sustainability efforts to achieve recognition. Determined by goals. May have operational and/or cost implications. Markets the specific sustainable practices and related EONS benefits on local, national, and international levels. 55 Require that conceptual plans/criteria documents outline sustainability goals, objectives, and potential achievements. If anticipated early on, costs may be reduced. Incorporates environmental aspects into each project. Determined by goals. May have operational and/or cost implications. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. May affect the ability for minority/ Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) contractors to meet requirements. 3 Document all sustainable construction activities to track progress at several stages throughout the construction process (e.g., checklists and progress reports). Prepare interim progress reports to track and document any gaps in construction or documentation. Provide continual feedback on sustainability performance. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Helps achieve environmental goals. Helps ensure that the contractor is following sustainability requirements. Helps track sustainability goals, accomplishments, and lessons learned. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 39 Review sustainable building requirements in specifications with each subcontractor prior to commencement of work. Creates awareness; helps achieve cost objectives. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. Ensures that project team members are incorporating sustainability requirements in their daily responsibilities and assignments. Promotes awareness and internal communication. 55 Develop detailed technical specifications and standards to implement sustainable construction practices; include these sustainability specifications in contracts. Widely varies on detail and goals. Incorporates environmental aspects into each project. Determined by goals. May have operational and/or cost implications. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. May affect the ability for minority/DBE contractors to meet requirements. 2

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -3 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Policies and Regulations Policies, Procedures, and Plans Use w eb-based, independent industr y resources in project specifications to max imize the use of sustainable materials and products. LEED® MR Credit 4 Rapidly ev ol vi ng field makes it difficult to know w hat is av ailable; use av ailable unbiased information. Ex amples include: GreenSpec from Building Green, Inc. (www .buildingreen.com) and Oi ko s (www .oikos.com). For product benefits, seek unbiased research and rev iew s. Many online dire ctories and databases list product descriptions of env ironmentally preferable products and independent research to ensure that product descriptions contain unbiased information. Check for third-party indepen dent va lidations of sustainable materials. Consider wo rking wi th local communities or nonprofit organizations to de ve lop and collect reliable product information. 3 Dev elop and implement a program to track and report sustainable construction goals and progress achiev ed (e.g., a sustainabilit y management sy stem). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Widely va ries on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Incorporates env ironmental aspects into each project. Determined by goals. May hav e operational and/or cost implications. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport if part of an outreach program . 39 Apply for na tional, state, and local competitiv e grants to support the selected sustainable construction practices. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Grant opportunities va ry wi del y by sta te/federal agency and ov er time; may help offset costs. May enable fur ther env ironmental initiativ es. Could affect the ti mi ng of initiativ es and reporting requirements. May in vo lv e DBE or community organi zations. 39 Pursue U.S. Green Building Council (USGBC) LEED® certification, as applicable. Anticipate the LEED® process early in th e planning process. LEED® General SFO, BOS, ORD Obtaining certification may increase initial costs of a project. If anticipated early on, costs may be re duced. Achiev ement of LEED® certification may result in the identification of additional sustainable practice opportunities, wh ich ma y prov ide positiv e life cy cle economic benefits. Prov ides third-party ve rification of sustainable practice achiev ements. Pursue as early in the project planning process as possible. Determined by goals. Facilitates documentation and progress tracking. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport; good for public relations. 64 Post signage (e.g., display /poster boards) of LEED®/sustainability goals for con struction projects. LEED® General Minimal cost. Creates aw areness of env ironmental focus and benefits. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Promotes wo rker, customer, and community awareness of the airport operator' s sustainability objectiv es/goals. 3 Dev elop and implement an env ironmental management sy stem (EMS) that includes con struction projects. DFW, DEN; SFO, SLC Widely va ries on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Helps achiev e env ironmental goals. Helps meet regulatory requirements and in assigning responsibilities, and helps wi th tracking and reporting. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport; good for public relations. 2 Prepare internal and ex ternal communication reports on sustainabilit y performance of construction projects. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Widely va ries on detail and goals. Helps meet sustainability goals and facilitates additional sustainable practices. Helps ensure that the contractor is follow ing sustainabilit y requirements. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport; good for public relations. Helps promote aw areness. 39 (continued on next page)

A -4 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Policies and Regulations Policies, Procedures, and Plans Ensure that those directly responsible for the project have been informed of the environmental impacts and associated social issues related to their part or stage of the project. Widely varies on detail and goals. Helps meet sustainability goals and facilitates additional sustainable practices. Communicate sustainability goals and requirements at pre-bid, bid, and project start. Inform contractors of the environmental issues and social impacts during the preconstruction meeting. May help improve the community's view of the airport; good for public relations. 20 Develop construction specifications for the airport using publicly accessible or "free" tools and resources, such as the National Institute of Building Sciences, Whole Building Design Guide (WBDG) Green Building Specifications (www.wbdg.org), and the Port of Portland's Master Construction Specifications website (www.portofportland.com). ORD Use available/existing free resources to minimize cost. Incorporates environmental aspects into each project. Determined by goals. May have operational and/or cost implications. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. May affect the ability for minority/DBE contractors to meet requirements. 43, 53 Require regular sustainability progress reports during construction projects (quarterly or at construction milestones) that indicate sustainability goals, accomplishments, and lessons learned. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Helps achieve environmental goals. Helps ensure that the contractor is following sustainability requirements. Helps track sustainability goals, accomplishments, and lessons learned. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 39 Tie sustainability reporting and performance requirements to monthly and project completion payments (invoices). ORD Negative cost implications for noncompliance. Emphasizes the importance of meeting sustainability requirements. Compliance ensures realization of operational benefits established in contracts. Clarifies requirements up front. Compliance ensures realization of social benefits established in contracts. 18 Establish penalties for contractors who don't comply with sustainability reporting and performance requirements. ORD Negative cost implications for noncompliance. Emphasizes the importance of meeting sustainability requirements. Compliance ensures realization of operational benefits established in contracts. Clarifies requirements up front. Compliance ensures realization of social benefits established in contracts. 18 Use web directories and links; web-based document sharing; web based procurement process - Requests for Qualifications/ Requests for Proposals (RFQ/RFP), notices/advertisements; electronic submittal forms/templates; and electronic/digital document processes to reduce paper needs. Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. May reduce printing, postage, and administrative costs. Reduces the use of paper. Make documents/ resources available online and/or part of the bid advertisement process. Improves the flow of information. Facilitates tracking and reporting; maximizes teamwork, transparency, and information sharing. Enables flow of information to additional persons. 2 Develop and implement an underground and/or above ground storage tank management plan. Helps avoid unexpected costs. Helps meet regulatory requirements and protects the natural environment. Establish procedures. Improves safety and awareness. 2

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -5 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Policies and Regulations Sustainability Meetings, Teams, and Presentations Establish a regular meeting schedule to discuss sustainability progress (either as separate meetings or as an agenda item at other meetings). ORD Incorporate into the ov erall sustainabilit y management program . Creates aw areness. Engage the airport 's construction and maintenance, tenants, airlines, local regulators, and/or FAA and USEPA represe ntativ es as appropriate. Promotes aw areness of sustainability objectiv es/goals, especially if part of an outreach program . 19 Create a "Construction Sustainability Coordinator" position or an "Office of Sustainability " wi thin the organization. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Could result in additional project costs, but ma y be wo rthw hile if ex tensiv e sustainable practices are being implemented (e.g., may ex pedite the LEED® proce ss). Establishes that a project/airport has an env ironmental focus. Assign responsibility . Promotes aw areness. 39 Form a "Green Team" that w ould be responsible for managing the integration of selected sustainable construction practices. ORD Can help identify potent ial cost sav ings. Prov ides third-party ve rification of sustainable practice achiev ements. Helps achiev e env ironmental goals. Include members from across the organization to facilitate integration and implementation. Helps promote internal aw areness. 19 Conduct preconstruction and/or project kickoff meetings wi th sustainabilit y requirements included on the agenda. Communicate sustainabilit y goals and requirements at pre-bid, bid, and project sta rt. Creates aw areness; helps achiev e cost objecti ve s. Helps contractors understand and comply wi th su stain abili ty requirements. Creates aw areness; helps achiev e env ironmental objectiv es. Ensures sustainabilit y is considered at the start and continued through the project. Improv es internal communication and aw areness; facilitates complian ce wi th tra cki ng requirements. 3 As part of the preconstruction meeting (or other similar meeting), hire an inspector/construction sustainabilit y liaison to the ow ner (potentially a LEE D® AP) to wo rk on sustainability tra ining in conjunction wi th project and site managers. Introduce the selected inspe ct or to the construction team and allow them to hav e an introductory question and answ er session. Require regular meetings (w eekl y or monthly ) wi th the sustainability liaison . LEED® ID Credi t 2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Could result in additional project costs, but ma y be wo rthw hile if ex tensiv e sustainable practices are being implemented. Helps achiev e env ironmental goals. Helps ensure that the contractor is follow ing sustainabilit y requirements. Helps tra ck sustainability goals, accomplishments, and lessons learned. Ma y help improv e the community 's view of the airport if part of an outreach program . 39 Send the selected contractor the sustainability requir ements (guidance, specifications, tracking forms, LEED® requirements, etc.) prior to the preconstruction and project kickoff meeting(s). If anticipated early on, costs ma y be reduced. Incorporates env ironmental aspects into each project. May help streamlin e the project process. Improv es internal communication and aw areness. Facilitates tracking and reporting to the public. 3 (continued on next page)

A -6 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Policies and Regulations Sustainability Meetings, Teams, and Presentations Identify sustainability reporting (submittal) and performance requirement milestones (e.g., at project startup, monthly, and at project completion). Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Compliance ensures realization of economic benefits established in contracts. Compliance ensures realization of environmental benefits established in contracts. Compliance ensures realization of operational benefits established in contracts. Clarifies requirements upfront. Compliance ensures realization of social benefits established in contracts. 3 Provide sustainable construction training and awareness programs, presentations, workshops, or meetings for contractors, airport staff, the media, and the community. DEN Creates awareness; helps achieve cost objectives. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. Use internal workshops or workshops available through other organizations; for example, LEED® training workshops are available across the United States throughout the year. Visit www.usgbc.org. Promotes awareness and internal and external communication. 15 Provide posters, flyers, and exhibit boards displaying LEED®/ sustainability requirements and processes for contractors. LEED® General Creates awareness at a minimal initial cost; may help achieve cost objectives. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. May help streamline the project process. Promotes awareness and internal and external communication. 35 Assign one or more project team members on the construction team to take the LEED® Professional Accreditation Exam, if not already accredited. LEED® ID Credit 2 SFO, BOS, ORD Creates awareness; helps achieve cost objectives. Requires an upfront cost for the exam and preparatory materials. Helps achieve LEED® points. Creates awareness of environmental focus and benefits. Expedites the LEED® process. Pursue early on in the project planning process. Promotes awareness of LEED® requirements on the project team. 39 Assign or hire a LEED® AP to review information regarding sustainable concepts, practices, and submittals. LEED® ID Credit 2 SFO, BOS, ORD Can help identify potential cost savings. Creates awareness of environmental focus and benefits. Facilitates the flow of information and helps meet submittal requirements. Helps promote internal awareness. 39 Community Outreach Conduct community partnering programs by developing partnerships with community groups, schools, and local businesses. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Raises awareness; enhances the airport so that it can continue to be an economic generator and create additional economic benefits for the community. Sharing resources may provide cost savings for both the airport and the community (e.g., sharing of excess construction materials). Creates awareness of environmental focus and benefits. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Will reduce delays during planning, reduce the risk of environmental protest during site works, enhance community relations, and provide for greater acceptance of the completed scheme. 2, 39 Create an interactive multimedia display (i.e., video, website, kiosk, etc.) to engage and educate visitors about the sustainable aspects of construction projects. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Creates awareness at a minimal initial cost. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Promotes awareness and internal and external communication. Facilitates information sharing with airport customers. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -7 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Policies and Regulations Community Outreach Coordinate w ith local schools to arrange for field trips or presentations to prov ide education on sustainable construction practices. ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD No applicable Research Team Consideration. Establishes that a project/airport has an env ironmental focus. Carefully plan a nd coordinate airfield tours to ensure they w ould not delay (or be delay ed by ) airport operations and/or construction projects. Promotes aw areness, communication, and educational opportunities in the local community . 39 Partner wi th univ ersities and research centers to ev aluate, demonstrate, and potentially marke t new sustainable airport con struction practices. SFO Improv es economic efficiency . May help attra ct grant and industry funding. Improv es env ironmental effi cien cy . Impro ve s operational effi cien cy . Promotes aw areness, communication, and educational opportunities. 16 Establish sustainable airport construction internships, stew ardships, and/or public education program s (focus on low - income and div erse populations). Prov ides added staff assistance and creates research and educational opportunities. Establishes that a project/airport has an env ironmental focus. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Helps assure that the community is inv olved in the project. Prov ides job opportunities and career training for the local communit y. Promotes aw areness, communication, and educational opportunities. 3 Conduct contractor job fairs for upcoming airport projects. Publish updates on the airport' s w ebsi te. Facilitates a competitiv e bid process. Creates project aw areness. Creates aw areness, especially on the contra ctor lev el, of env ironmental goals and objectiv es. Facilitates the flow of information and ma y help ex pedite the selection proce ss. Prov ides job opportunities for the local and regional communities. Prom otes aw areness, communication, and educational opportunities. 3 Conduct contractor open houses to describe upcoming projects and sustainabilit y requirements. Facilitates a competitiv e bid process. Creates project aw areness. Helps make sure procurement requirements are me t for Minorit y- ow ned Business Enterprises (MBEs) and DBEs. Creates aw areness, especially for contr actors, of env ironmental goals and objectiv es. Facilitates the flow of information and ma y help ex pedite the selection proce ss. May help prov ide opportunities for the inv ol ve ment of MBEs, small and/or local businesses. 3 Use contractor open houses to surv ey attendees about their sustainability know ledge, ex perience, and abilit y to comply wi th sustainability prov isions. Ensure s contractors can comply w ith project prov isions. Ensure s contractors can achiev e the env ironmental objectiv es (e.g., Tier compliance of construction equipment). Facilitates the flow of information and ma y help meet sustainability requirements. May help prov ide opportunities for the inv ol ve ment of MBEs, small, and/or local businesses. 3 Conduct an industry forum/ con ference to share and learn about sustainable construction practices (engage other contractors, the local communit y, and the construction and aviation industries). Conduct tours of the construction site. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Raises aw areness; potential cost sav ings from learning fro m others. Creates aw areness of env ironmental focus and benefits. Use industry con fer ences, annual reports, w ebsites, presentations, press releases, articles in trade journals, etc. Markets the specific sustainable practices and related EONS benefits on local, national, and international lev els. 3, 39 Establish industry peer re vi ew groups to prov ide input and ex periences regarding sustainable construction practices. Potential cost sav ings from sharing information and learning fro m others. Prov ides env ironmental benefits from sharing information and learning from others. Prov ides operational benefits from sharing inform ation and learning fro m others. Promotes aw areness, communication, and educational opportunities. 3 (continued on next page)

A -8 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Policies and Regulations Community Outreach Create and implement a policy or code of practice regarding considerate behavior. At a minimum, it should cover: relations with neighbors, communications to neighbors, good housekeeping, presentation of the site, relations with other stakeholders, and complaints procedures. Facilitates compliance; may help avoid potentially expensive project delays and legal issues. Emphasizes the importance of meeting sustainability requirements. Ensure that this policy is communicated to all of the appropriate people working on the project. Creates internal and external communication. 20 Employ local construction workers to decrease the disruption caused to local communities by commuters, which would also provide local economic benefits. Use community job fairs and contractor open houses to ensure a local pool of construction workers. Reduces expenses from having to travel long distances. Reduces emissions, noise, and roadway congestion. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Provides job opportunities for the local and regional communities. Promotes awareness, communication, and educational opportunities. 20 Human Resources Include educational training on sustainability objectives established for the project team as part of the initial project planning meeting and throughout the project. ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Creates awareness; helps achieve cost objectives. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. Ensures that project team members are incorporating sustainability requirements in their daily responsibilities and assignments. Promotes awareness and internal communication. 19, 39 Provide training on the airport's sustainable planning, design, and construction guidelines, including their bases, the parties responsible for using the guidelines, and the sustainable rating system. ORD Creates awareness; helps achieve cost objectives. Creates awareness; helps achieve environmental objectives. Ensures that project team members are incorporating sustainability requirements in their daily responsibilities and assignments. Use these forums to capture ideas on how to further improve sustainability performance. Promotes awareness and internal communication. 19 Develop a strategic human capital retention and development plan in conformance with the overall project plan, organizational needs, and changing business needs. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduction in employee turnover and identification of skilled labor needs early on will reduce project delays and costs. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduction in employee turnover and identification of skilled labor needs early on will help ensure that construction proceeds according to schedule. Provides job opportunities for the local and regional communities. Promotes awareness, communication, and educational opportunities. 39 Contract with a mix of general contractors and subcontractors with sustainability experience and/or knowledge (e.g., LEED®-accredited staff). Sustainability consulting services shall be provided by an organization with a minimum of 3-5 years experience on projects of similar size and scope. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Could result in additional project costs, but may be worthwhile if extensive sustainable practices are being implemented. Contractor should be familiar with Environmental Management Systems (EMSs) (ISO 14001 Standard) and with the USGBC LEED® Green Building Rating Program and a successful history of completed LEED® projects. Helps create an appropriate sustainable attitude among all contractors. A list of contractors who are members of the USGBC is provided at www.usgbc.org/myUSGBC/ Members/MembersDirectory. aspx May help improve the community's view of the airport; good for public relations. 39, 43, 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -9 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Policies and Regulations Human Resources Require that contractors hav e a published corporate sustainabilit y policy . Ev aluate the policy during th e RFP/RFQ proce ss. Selecting contractors that understand the concepts of sustainability may facili tate the achiev ement of sustainability requir ements, reducing project costs. Creates aw areness of env ironmental focus; helps ensure that selected contractors are passionate about sustainability . Ensure s that contractors hav e some familiarit y wi th sustainability co ncepts. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport; good for public relations. 3 Use subcontractors wi th "in house" fabrication capabilities to increase the aw areness of wa ste reduction and ensure more control ov er deliv er y sch edule s. Could result in additional upfront project costs if the capabilities are specialized wi th few compe titors, but may reduce li fe cy cle costs. May reduce env ironmental impacts. May impro ve operational issues wi th ma terial s deliv er y. May reduce numbe r of deliv eries and wa ste haul trips, reducing impacts to surrounding comm unity . 55 Use only de sign-build contractors wi th performance-based fee incentiv es to encourage innov ativ e sustainability solu tion s. May increase proje ct costs, but could also be tied to cost sav ings generated by any innov ativ e practices used . Encourages contractors to activ el y pursue and implement sustainable practices, wh ich ma y result in env ironmental benefits. Design-build contracts and/or performance- based fee incentiv es may not be allow ed by the contracting agency /agencies. Encourages contractors to activ el y pursue and implement sustainable practices, wh ich ma y result in operational benefits. Encourages contractors to activ el y pursue and implement sustainable practices, wh ich ma y result in social benefits. 55 Link achiev ement of the construction team's sustainability goals to performance rev ie ws of key personne l. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Creates aw areness; helps achiev e cost objecti ve s. Creates aw areness; helps achiev e env ironmental objectiv es. Ensures that project team members are incorporating sustainabilit y requirements in their daily respo nsibilities and assignments. Promotes aw areness and internal communication. 39 Health and Safety Construction Worker Protection Appoint a health and safety manager for the con struction site. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase proje ct costs, but could result in cost sa vi ngs from fe we r injuries and increased safety aw areness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. 39 Dev elop a site-specific health and safety plan that identifies all potential hazards and steps to be taken to mitigate accidents. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase proje ct costs, but could result in cost sa vi ngs from fe we r injuries and increased safety aw areness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. 39 Require that all construction wo rkers hav e proper safety cer tifications. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May result in cost savings from few er injuries and increa sed safe ty aw areness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. 39 Participate in the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA's) Voluntary Pr ot ec tion Programs. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase proje ct costs, but could result in cost sa vi ngs from fe we r injuries and increased safety aw areness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. Increases safe ty aw areness, wh ich should reduce injuries. 39 (continued on next page)

A -10 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Policies and Regulations Health and Safety Construction Worker Protection Establish an emergency notification program. Identify and display telephone numbers and driving directions to the nearest hospital or emergency care provider. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Increases awareness and preparedness for emergencies, which may result in financial benefit. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases awareness and preparedness for emergencies. Increases awareness and preparedness for emergencies. 39 Conduct safety observations to ensure that workers are abiding by the health and safety plan. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase project costs, but could result in cost savings from fewer injuries and increased safety awareness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safety awareness, which should reduce injuries. Increases safety awareness, which should reduce injuries. 39 Record and submit weekly reports summarizing all safety incidents as well as all events that may have resulted in an accident and an evaluation of the steps that can be taken to prevent those events in the future. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase project costs, but could result in cost savings from fewer injuries and increased safety awareness. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Increases safety awareness, which should reduce injuries. Increases safety awareness, which should reduce injuries. 39 Determine conclusively if toxic dusts or fumes exist or will enter breathing space during construction, especially during renovation of buildings; take corrective action if necessary. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces potential of harm to construction workers. Identifies and reduces emissions of toxic substances. May cause some delays to work, but improves safety of work environment. Reduces potential of harm to construction workers, site personnel, customers, and public. 39 Provide signs reminding workers of long- term health risks resulting from exposure to particulates and the unknown toxics attached to particulates. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces potential of harm to construction workers. Increases awareness and compliance with proper dust control measures. Increases awareness and compliance with proper dust control measures. Reduces potential of harm to construction workers, site personnel, customers, and public. 39 Use personal air monitoring systems to inform construction workers of hazardous environments. This technology can improve occupational safety and health in the construction workplace. Reduces potential of harm to construction workers. Identifies and reduces emissions of toxic substances. May cause some delays to work, but improves safety of work environment. Reduces potential of harm to construction workers and site personnel. 55 Provide reusable or ventilated masks/respirators for worker comfort and health. Require construction workers to wear them when dust emissions are visible. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces potential of harm to construction workers. Increases awareness and compliance with proper dust control measures. Increases awareness and compliance with proper dust control measures. Reduces potential of harm to construction workers and site personnel. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -11 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Policies and Regulations Health and Safety Construction Worker Protection Monitor the site' s daily and/or historical air quality index lev el(s) vi a the U.S. Env ironmental Protection Agency 's (USEPA's) My En vi ronment w ebpage. The desired location is key ed in from the USEPA Home Page (www .epa.gov ) under the se ction ti tled "M yE nv ironment." Water quality and h ealth risk updates can also be accessed vi a this w ebsite. Reduces potential of harm to construction wo rkers. Increases aw areness and compliance wi th proper dust control measures. Increases aw areness and compliance wi th proper dust control measures. Reduces potential of harm to construction wo rkers and site personnel. 3 Health and Safety Environmental To bacco Smoke (ET S) Control Require all parts of the construction sites to be nonsmoking. LEED® IEQ Prerequi site 2 May reduce site cle anup costs. Remov es tobacco smoke as a potential emission from the con struction site. Increases site safety. Depending on local regulations, the contracting agency /agencies ma y or may not hav e the authority to ban smoking onsite. Increases site safety and eliminates ex posure to toba cco smoke. 2 Prohibit smoking w ithin structures under construction and restrict smoking onsite during construction. LEED® IEQ Prerequi site 2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May reduce site cle anup costs and prev ent damage of installed building components. Limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . Increases site safety. Depending on local regulations, the contracting agency /agencies ma y or may not hav e the authority to ban smoking onsite. Increases site safety and limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . 39 Prov ide a designated ex terior smoking area (protected from the elements) that is sufficientl y distant from construction acti vi ties. Locate an y ex terior designated smoking areas aw ay from entr ies and operable wi ndo ws . LEED® IEQ Prerequi site 2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May reduce site cle anup costs and prev ent damage of installed building components. Limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . Increases site safety. Depending on local regulations, the contracting agency /agencies ma y or may not hav e the authority to ban smoking onsite. Increases site safety and limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . 39 If an interior smoking area is necessary, prov ide a designated smoking room designed to effectiv ely contain , cap ture, and remov e ETS from the building using a separa te v entilation sy stem . LEED® IEQ Prerequi site 2 Increases costs but limits ex posure to ETS; may prev ent damage to installed building components. Limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . Increases site safety. Increases site safety and limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . 2 Establish zero ex posure of nonsmokers to ETS. LEED® IEQ Prerequi site 2 ORD No applicable Research Team Consideration. Limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . Increases site safety. Depending on local regulations, the contracting agency (ies) may or may not hav e the authority to ban smoking on-site. Limits ex posure to tobacco smoke . 19 (continued on next page)

A -12 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Scheduling and Sequencing Expedite completion of the building envelope to minimize moisture exposure to interior surfaces, thus minimizing the potential for mold. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps avoid additional costs associated with installing or replacing damaged materials. Can reduce landfill hauls of damaged materials/ components. Also reduces the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. May minimize temporary airport activity delays and landside passenger traffic delays. By preventing mold from growing, worker and occupant health can be preserved. Reduced temporary traffic delays would benefit the community. 39 Plan the phases or stages of construction to minimize exposure. Before site disturbance occurs, perimeter controls, sediment traps, basins, and diversions should be in place to control runoff and capture sediments. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Can avoid costs of fines from violating permitting agency or government regulations. Can control runoff and capture sediments as site disturbance occurs. Minimizes runoff into nearby water resources. Consider the local climate and geology. May reduce impacts to water quality in the local community. 39 Use "lean construction" project management practices (e.g., minimal inventory and "cradle to grave" project delivery). A lean construction production system delivers a custom product instantly on order, but maintains no intermediate inventories. Reduces extra handling and excessive labor. Can reduce material costs by ordering only what is needed, but may increase transportation costs if supplies are not ordered in bulk; the personnel in charge of ordering construction materials should identify which materials make the most economic sense to be ordered in bulk and which should be ordered "just in time." Reduces waste associated with inventories and defective products. Can increase transportation-related emissions if supplies are not ordered in bulk (e.g., several trips). Reduces the environmental impacts of having to produce and haul re-ordered materials or to return excess materials. By reducing pressures to keep construction running at maximum production, extensive intermediate inventories or “the waste of over production” can be reduced. Requires tight coordination between the construction process and the arrival of parts from supply chains. May add to local community traffic if this practice increases the number of deliveries on a project level. 34, 62 Evaluate projects and components on a life cycle basis. Perform a life cycle assessment (LCA) of the environmental aspects and potential impacts associated with a product, process, or service by: (1) compiling an inventory of relevant energy and material inputs and environmental releases; (2) evaluating the potential environmental impacts associated with identified inputs and releases; and (3) interpreting the results to make a more informed decision. See www.epa.gov for information on managing and conducting an LCA. May reduce total life cycle costs (construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning). Considering the environmental costs and benefits of the project may reduce overall environmental impacts. Careful selection of products may reduce project waste and minimize maintenance. May reduce the frequency and duration of future construction projects (minimizing temporary construction impacts on the local community; e.g., noise levels and traffic impacts). 20

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -13 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Planning for Deconstruction and Disassembly Plan for potential uses for the structure and building components (consider future va lue of materials and sy stems during sele ctio n). ORD Can reduce future building costs by av oiding the need to purc ha se new components or hav ing to remodel buildings. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the env ironmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Can reduce future generation of wa ste; faci litates flex ible use of spa ce. Reusing materials may reduce the frequency and duration of future construction projects (minimizing temporary construction impacts on the local community , e.g., noise and tra ffic). 2 Ev aluate potential uses for mechanical, electrical, and plum bing sy stems. ORD Can reduce future building costs by av oiding the need to purc ha se new components. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the env ironmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Can reduce future generation of wa ste; faci litates flex ible use of spa ce. Reusing materials may reduce the frequency and duration of future construction projects (minimizing temporary construction impacts on the local community , e.g., noise and tra ffic). 2 Use homogeneous material w henev er possible. Homogeneous material means a unit that can not be mechanically disjointed in single materials. Homogeneous materials include indiv idual ty pes of plastics, ceramics, glass, metals, alloys, paper, board, resins, and coatings. ORD Use of homogeneous material may reduce complex it y, co st, a nd maintenance. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces the duration of deconstruction. May reduce the dur ation of deconstruction, minimizing temporary impacts on the local communi ty su ch as traffi c. 2 Prov ide instructions and ensure that connections are accessible to ex pedite the disassembly proce ss. Prov iding disassembly instructions helps ensure that components can be disassembled and potentially reuse d at minimal cost. Accessible connections allow disassembly to occur faster than otherw ise might be possible. May reduce dur ation and area of disturbance during disa ssembl y. Detailed instructions ma y decrease necessar y staff training. May reduce impacts to airport operations in terminals during future rehabilitation projects. May enhance w orker safe ty . 2 Minimize the use of chemical (adhesiv e) connectors; instead use friction-based connectors. Some friction-based connectors may be more ex pensiv e than chemical connectors. Reduces ex posure to hazardous chemical products. Ma y be easier to ma intain. May minimize wo rker ex posure to potentially harmful chemicals. 2 Select fi ttin gs, fasteners, adhesiv es, and sealants that allow for quicker disassembly and fa cilitate the remov al of reusable materials. Material reuse is highly dependent u pon the connections. May decrease di sassembly labor costs. May reduce dur ation and area of disturbance during disa ssembl y. May allo w for ea si er disassembly , reducing impacts to airport operations during future projects. May enhance w orker safe ty . 55 (continued on next page)

A -14 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Planning for Deconstruction and Disassembly Design the HVAC system so that it is easy to expand or downsize depending on the future needs of the space. Specify flexible components of HVAC, electrical and fiber optics, and other wiring. May decrease operational costs (e.g., energy) and capital costs (e.g., equipment) by optimizing for current use. May decrease energy consumption by not over- sizing components. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce the duration of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community; e.g., noise levels and traffic impacts). 2 Design and install AC roof units so that additional units can be installed if necessary in the future. May avoid additional costs associated with expanding AC roof units. May reduce environmental impacts by eliminating need to expand structures. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce the duration of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community; e.g., noise levels and traffic impacts). 2 Strategically locate and appropriately identify load-bearing walls. May decrease future building costs to meet changing needs. Properly identifying load-bearing walls reduces costs associated with having to re-identify walls or creating unsafe renovations. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. Properly identifying load- bearing walls enables safe structural modifications. 2 Design for current needs with the ability to expand in the future. Do not oversize components during the initial design phase to account for future build-out. May decrease operational costs (e.g., energy), maintenance costs, and capital costs (e.g., equipment) by optimizing for current needs. May ensure efficient energy consumption by not oversizing components. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce future temporary construction impacts on the local community, (e.g., noise and traffic). 2 Use a raised floor system to reduce data and communication installation costs during initial build-out and allow for easier, more economical moves and space reconfiguration. Reduces data and communication installation costs and allows for more economical moves and space reconfiguration. Compare incremental costs of raised floor to reduced costs of installation and maintenance (materials and labor) for data and communication cabling. Minimizes noise impacts in occupied areas. May require less data and communication wiring. May allow for easier expansion or deconstruction, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May improve employee productivity by reducing noise distractions. 55 Design for additional temperature, electrical, sprinkler, and communication zones in a large space so that future renovations will have adequate services. May minimize future costs to meet changing needs. May reduce need for future construction material. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce the duration of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community; e.g., noise levels and traffic impacts). 2 Place entrances and corridors to spaces in such a way that future uses can take advantage of existing egresses. May decrease future rehabilitation costs. May reduce need for future construction material. May allow for easier expansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce the duration of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community; e.g., noise levels and traffic impacts). 2

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -15 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Planning for Deconstruction and Disassembly Place wi ndow s in ne w construction projects wi th appropriate spacing for future placement of div iders or permanent wa lls. May decrease futu re renov ation costs to meet changing needs. May reduce nee d for future con struction material. May allo w for ea si er ex pansion, reducing future impacts to airport operations. May reduce the dur ation of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community ; e.g., noise lev els and traffic impacts). 2 Ev aluate the structure and component life cy cle prior to purchasing materials/equipment. May reduce tota l life cy cle costs (construction, operation, maintenance, and decommissioning). Considering the env ironmental costs and benefits of the project may reduce ov erall env ironmental impacts. Careful selection of products may redu ce project wa ste and minimize maintenance. May reduce the dur ation of future projects (minimizing temporary impacts on the local community ; e.g., noise lev els and traffic impacts). 2 Create touchdow n spaces or other flex ible and div erse wo rk spaces to enable ex pansion as we ll as ad hoc collaborations and enhance opportunities for efficient use of facilities. May reduce co st of future ex pansion projects. May reduce nee d for future con struction material. Flex ible wo rkspaces may increase efficient use of spa ces. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 2 Noise and Acoustical Quality Require contractors to submit sound reduction construction plans to mitigate construction noise and vi bration impacts. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May ha ve cost and schedule implications; wi del y va ries on detail and goals. Ma y reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitiv e land uses and help reduce v ibration impacts. May restri ct ty pe and timing of construction operations. May minimize impa cts on airport activ ities and landside passenger traffic. Ma y reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitiv e land uses. May reduce complaints from the local communit y and/or improv e the community 's vi ew of the airport. 39 Require mufflers on all construction equipment so that noise lev els are below the construction equipment noise lev els and ranges listed in Appendix A of th e U.S. Department of Transp ortation' s Special Report: Highw ay Construction Noise: Measurement, Prediction, and Mitigation. May ha ve cost impl ications. Ma y reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitiv e land use s. Ensure this policy is communicated to all of the appropriate people wo rking on the project. Ma y reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitiv e land uses. 2, 28 As a courtesy , notify neighbors prior to starting a job that will create noise. Communicate wi th neighbors to prev ent complaints from arising and resolv e concerns before a problem arises. Prov ide a telephone number at wh ich the foreman can be reached prior to the start of the job. Facilitates compliance; ma y help av oid potentially ex pensiv e project delay s. Emphasizes the importance of meeting noise le ve l requirements. Ensure this policy is communicated to all of the appropriate people wo rking on the project. Facilitates communication and aw areness wi th adjacent land ow ners; may reduce ov erall noise complain ts. 17 (continued on next page)

A -16 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Noise and Acoustical Quality Establish and monitor compliance with a specified construction equipment operation schedule. For example, prohibit operating or causing the operation of any tools or equipment used in construction, drilling, repair, alteration, or demolition work between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. on weekdays, and between 8 p.m. and 9 a.m. on weekends or holidays to prevent noise disturbances across a residential or commercial real property line. May have cost and schedule implications. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses. May restrict type and timing of construction operations. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may reduce noise complaints. 17 Use rubberized pavements or innovative pavement treatments to reduce traffic noise. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Consider additional costs of treatment installation and surface maintenance. Minimizes noise impacts in occupied areas. Consider environmental impacts as treatments deteriorate. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May improve employee productivity by reducing noise distractions. 39 Establish construction vehicle speed limits to minimize noise and dust. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses and minimize dust emissions. May improve safety of construction operations. Creates a safer work site and may reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise- sensitive land uses. 2 Locate mechanical equipment and other sources of noise away from occupied areas (or vice versa). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May have cost and schedule implications and may be impractical/ impossible to implement depending on construction project. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses. May restrict type and timing of construction operations and may be impractical or impossible to implement depending on type of construction project. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses. May improve employee productivity by reducing noise distractions. 39 Install portable and permanent noise barriers. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May have cost and schedule implications. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may reduce noise complaints. 39 Replace noisy construction equipment with quieter units. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May have significant cost implications. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may reduce noise complaints. 39 Use lower settings on power equipment whenever possible. May have schedule implications. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses, but may also increase emissions. May have schedule implications. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may reduce noise complaints. 17 Use rubber-tired equipment in lieu of track equipment to reduce noise. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may result in less ground disturbance and minimize dust emissions. May be impractical or impossible to use track equipment depending on topography and soil conditions. May reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitive land uses; may reduce noise complaints. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -17 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Noise and Acoustical Quality Hav e a designated airport compliance representativ e certify and randomly inspect all internal combustion, mobile portable, stationar y, an d pow er-actuated construction equipment to ensure compliance wi th noise reduction measures. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Could result in additional project costs, but inspection ensures compliance and may help av oid potentially ex pensiv e project delay s. Ma y reduce noise impacts from construction equipment. May cause brie f interruptions in construction schedules for testing and correctiv e measures. Ma y reduce noise impacts on adjacent noise-sensitiv e land uses; may reduce noise compl aints. 39 Follow OSHA's noi se ex posure rules regarding how long a wo rker may be ex posed to specific noise lev els before hearing protection is required: a wo rker is allow ed to be unprotected up to 8 hours at a noise lev el of 90 decibels (dB); up to 4 hours at 95 dB; and up to 1 hour at 105 dB. May ha ve minor co st implications for earpieces, headsets, mufflers, and/or a compliance inspector. No applicable Research Team Consideration. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Promotes wo rker safety and aw areness, and creates a safer wo rk env ironment. 17 Use soundless chemical demolition agents (SCDAs) as a substitute for ex plosiv es. The relativ el y high cost of soundless chemical demolition agents makes traditional ex plosives more cost-effectiv e in many applications. Does not cause noise, ground v ibrations, or dust. Pow ders used are nontox ic, consisting of ox ides of calcium, silicon, and aluminum. Safer than traditional ex plosiv es, wh ich pose the threat of premature ex plosion and wh ich may misfire; can be used near inhabited areas, natural gas lines, roadw ay s, etc. w here ex plosiv es w ould pose a safe ty risk. Traditional ex plosion techniques in vo lv e risks posed by sho ck wa ve s and fly rock. Reduces n oise in the surrounding communit y and may prev ent telephone calls to emergency serv ices. 6, 55 Site Disturbance Minimi za tion Compliance and Safet y Photographically documen t site conditions prior to start of construction operations (include aerial photographs). Take w eekly phot ographs throughout the entire project. Photographs shall be prov ided for unrestricted use by Ow ner. Submit (or require the contractor to submit) a minimum number (e.g., 20) of photographs on CD, formatted to ISO 9660) wi th each application for pay ment. Indi cate pho togr aph s demonstrating com pliance w ith env ironmental and/or sustainable procedures. Promotes aw areness and documents compliance wi th sustainable practices. Promotes aw areness and internal communication. 43 Flag or otherw ise mark all areas not to be disturbed by con str uction. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces areas of site disturbance and potential mitigation requirem ents. Reduces areas of site disturbance and potential env ironmental impacts. Establishes limits of con struction. Reduces areas of site disturbance and potential dust emissions. 39 Make sure that all contractors and subcontractors have been briefed on access road and staging area locations. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May help prev ent costly si te disturbance; briefings/meeting ma y ha ve minor cost implications. Ensure s that construction traffi c follow s de sig nated routes to minimize unnecessary site di sturbance and traffic congestion. Promotes site safety and esta blishes traffi c pa tte rns for the construction site. Promotes site safety and establishes traffic patterns; may reduce of fsite traffic congestion and impacts to surrounding roads. 39 (continued on next page)

A -18 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimization Compliance and Safety Use clean-cut or trenchless technology for installing and rehabilitating underground utility systems. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Excavation is typically more cost-effective when placement is shallow and traffic is not a major constraint. Cost is dependent of site characteristics and circumstances. Creates minimal surface disruption and can eliminate the need to remove sections of streets, sidewalks, and lawns, and can avoid tree loss and tree root damage. Reduces site disturbance. Construction often takes less time. Reduces traffic congestion, including traffic associated with culvert excavation. Reduces safety concerns associated with steep excavation slopes, work inside trench boxes, and worker exposure to traffic. May be susceptible to fire damage. 39 Install an Engineered Material Arresting System (EMAS) bed to meet Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Runway Safety Area requirements instead of affecting sensitive natural resources or existing infrastructure/facilities. ELM May have cost implications. The EMAS concrete bed has to be periodically maintained to ensure its integrity, and reconstructed if damaged by weather events or aircraft incidents, resulting in emissions and material requirements. EMAS beds require periodic maintenance and may need to be reconstructed if subjected to flooding. Provides increased aircraft safety on runway ends where it is impossible or difficult to provide a standard Runway Safety Area. 23 Site Disturbance Minimization Water Quality Protection Develop and implement a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan for construction activities. Inspect the site frequently to ensure compliance. LEED® SS Credit 6.1 BOS Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. May avoid future costs associated with noncompliance, as regulated by local governmental agencies. Helps meet regulatory requirements and protects the natural environment. Ensures that contaminants/ debris/materials are not carried offsite through stormwater. Helps meet regulatory requirements. Protects water quality in the local community. 2 Train on-site personnel in pollution prevention procedures and always make the SWPPP available at the construction site (and available online) for review. May avoid future costs associated with non- compliance as regulated by local governmental agencies. Raises awareness. Ensures comprehension of tasks; allows for streamlined operations. Promotes awareness and communication; protects water quality in the local community. 2 Monitor water quality impacts before and during construction, especially after significant storm events; address issues of concern (based on data from monitoring) as soon as possible. ORD Widely varies based on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. May avoid unexpected and potentially high costs. Ensures that construction activities have not affected water quality in the area. Address issues of concern (based on data from monitoring) as soon as possible. Protects water quality in the local community. 2 Prepare a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasures Plan for construction activities. BOS Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Can avoid unexpected and potentially large contamination cleanup costs. Can help minimize exposure of harmful substances/ contamination in the environment. Can avoid unexpected delays due to spill cleanup. Protects water quality in the local community. May minimize worker exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 2

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -19 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimi za tion Water Qualit y Protection Install slurry wa lls and/or bedrock grouting during construction to prev ent commingling of aquifers. These practices reduce the amount of ground wa ter penetrating detention basins, wh ich w ould require additional energy to pump . ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Cost-effective for many groundw ater control and groundw ater remediation problems. Cost is dependent on the depth, length, and wi dth of wa ll; site geological and hy drological characteristics; av ailable wo rkroom; etc. Protects against groundw ater contamination; may sav e energy from pumpi ng. May require the use of heavy construction equipment. Slurry wa ll/cuto ff wa ll ex ca va tions can be performed in all ty pes of soils and below the groundw ater table. Ex ca va tion deeper than 100 feet requires a crane and clam buck et. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local community . 39 Store wa ste in areas sheltered from rain and runoff. Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. Can help minimize ex posure of harmful substances/ contamination in the env ironment. Can av oid unex pected delay s due to spill cleanup. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local community . 2 Use nonto xi c wa ste materials in landscaping applications, such as brick nuggets - a by product of brick manufacturing. LEED® MR Credit 4 Poten tial cost sav ings; brick nuggets are ve ry durable. Useful application of a wa ste product. Brick nuggets are useful for wa lk wa ys , landscaping, and ground cov ering needs. Various colors, shapes, and sizes can be used to enhance the aesthetic va lue of the landscape. 55 Limit the number of designated concrete wa shout areas to av oid the ex pense of cleaning and maintaining sev eral small wa shout areas. Make sure wa shouts are sized appropriately for adequa te storage capacity . Use clear vi sible signs and educate the contractor to ensure that the designated areas are used. Av oids the ex pense of cleaning and maintaining sev eral small wa sh out areas; may require training costs. Limits areas of potential contamination. Consider locations in referen ce to job site to minimize transportation and schedule impacts to reach designated wa shout area. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local community . 55 Site Disturbance Minimi za tion Erosion and Sedimentation Control Dev elop and maintain a Soil Erosion and Sedimentation Control (SESC) Plan consistent wi th USEPA Document No. EPA 832/R-92-005 (Sept. 1992), Stormw ater Management for Construction Acti vi ties, Chapter 3. LEED® SS Prerequ isit e HNL, ORD Widely va ries on detail and goals, less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Can av oid unex pected and potentially large co sts. Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and other ma terials are not carried aw ay v ia runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delay s du e to unforeseen ev ents. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local community . 2, 38 Incorporate best management practices (BMPs), such as temporary sedimenta tion basins, temporary ditch che cks, div ersion dikes, temporary ditche s, sediment traps, silt fences, wa ter qualit y sw ales, rain gardens, dry we lls, and/or pipe slope drains into construction plans. LEED® SS Prerequ isite 1 ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May ha ve a high up front cost, but may av oid unex pected and potentially high costs. Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and other ma terials are not carried aw ay v ia runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delay s du e to unforeseen ev ents. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local community . 64 (continued on next page)

A -20 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimization Erosion and Sedimentation Control Perform an erosion control study for the stabilization of soils. DEN May require additional upfront costs; may keep operating costs to a minimum. May avoid future costs associated with noncompliance as regulated by local governmental agencies. May help prevent erosion and protect water quality. May require additional staff training. Can help streamline operations if soil conditions are thoroughly studied. Promotes internal awareness, communication, and education. Protects water quality in the local community. 9 Incorporate temporary and permanent soil stabilization techniques, including: compost, hydraulic mulch, hydroseeding, soil binders, straw mulch, wood mulch, and rolled mats. LEED® SS Prerequ isite 1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May avoid future costs associated with non- compliance as regulated by local governmental agencies. Ensures that soil, sand, gravel, and other materials are not carried away via runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiving waterbodies. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delays due to unforeseen events. Protects water quality in the local community. 39 To prevent erosion, minimize the extent and duration of bare ground surface exposure. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD, ORD Temporary seeding/ composting on bare surfaces may increase costs. Can minimize erosion and runoff into nearby water resources. May also help with dust control. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May increase employee welfare by reducing dust. May reduce impacts to water and air (dust) quality in the local community. 39 Maintain mulch stockpiles for use as needed to control erosion and conserve irrigation water. SLC, U42, TVY Reduces the demand for irrigation, saving costs. Conserves irrigation water and reduces erosion. Maintaining a stockpile onsite will keep operations timely. Protects water quality in the local community. 58 Use compost for erosion control and moisture retention. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May reduce fees for disposal of construction waste. Using compost can improve soil quality, reduce runoff, conserve water, and minimize the need for landscaping chemicals. Food waste should not be used on or near airport property to prevent potential wildlife hazard. Consider the site topography and geology. Protects the water supply in the local community. 39 Use lime as an aid for the modification and stabilization of soil beneath road and similar construction projects. Lime can modify almost all fine-grained soils, but the most dramatic improvement occurs in clay soils of moderate to high plasticity. ORD The structural contribution of lime-stabilized layers in pavement design can create more cost-effective design alternatives. Potentially more economical than importing aggregate for the same thickness of base course. Using lime can substantially increase the stability, impermeability, and load- bearing capacity of the sub- grade. Lime could leach into groundwater, contaminating nearby water sources. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delays due to unforeseen events. Placing the wrong kind or wrong amount of lime additive or improperly incorporating the additive into the soil can have devastating results. Protects water quality in the local community. 44 Use biodegradable rolled mulch mats/natural fiber geotextiles (permeable fabrics) to reduce erosion. Ensure that they conform to site contours. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Biodegradable mats do not require pickup from the construction site and disposal, reducing labor costs. Provides an alternative to plastic mats or other non- biodegradable materials. Ensures that soil, sand, gravel, and other materials are not carried away via runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiving waterbodies. Minimizes dust and helps establish vegetation quickly. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delays due to unforeseen events. Non- biodegradable textiles do not require removal. Protects water quality in the local community. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -21 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimi za tion Erosion and Sedimentation Control Minimize disturbance to landscaped areas and attempt to maintain ex isting topography , terrain, tree, and v egetation population (non-w ildlife attracting). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Can av oid costs associated wi th land clearing/lev eling. Ma y av oid repurchasing landscaping elements. Protects the natural env ironment; v egetation can reduce erosion and filter sediment. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May prev ent complaints from surrounding communities and ma intain an aesthetic appeal. 39 Achiev e permanent soil stabilization in seeded areas by co ve ring ov er 80 percent of soil surface wi th v egetation; make sure a lay er of topsoil and compost is present to support grow th. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. Protects the natural env ironment; v egetation can reduce erosion and filter sediment. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delay s du e to unforeseen ev ents. May enhance ae sthetics and protect wa ter qualit y in the local community . 39 Locate construction lay do wn areas and stockpiles in areas that w ill be pav ed as part of the construction. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. May help av oid unnecessary soil compaction and prev ent erosion . Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and other materials are not carried aw ay vi a runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delay s du e to unforeseen ev ents. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local communi ty . 39 Construct stabilized construction entrances on lev el ground w here possible. Grade the entrances to prevent runoff from leav ing the construction site and prov ide ample turning radii. HNL Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. May help av oid unnecessary soil compaction and prev ent erosion . Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and other materials are not carried aw ay vi a runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Accidental deposits must be sw ept up immediately and may not be wa shed dow n by rain or by any other means. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local communi ty . 13, 38 If a wa sh rack is prov ided at the construction v ehicle entrance, v ehicles are to be wa shed on a pav ed or crushed stone pad that drains into a properly constructed sediment trap or basin. Liquids from these activ ities shall be collected, managed as contaminated wa stew ater, and properly dispo sed. HNL May av oid future costs associated wi th non- compliance as regulated by local gov ernmental agencies. Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and chemicals are not carried aw ay vi a runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Multiple steps may require more time. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local communi ty . 38 Stabilize access roads, subdiv ision roads, parking areas, and other onsite v ehicle transportation routes immediately after grading and maintain them frequentl y to prev ent erosion and control dust. HNL Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. May help av oid unnecessary soil compaction and prev ent erosion . Ensures that soil, sand, grav el, and chemicals are not carried aw ay v ia runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiv ing wa terbodies. Increasing stability and reducing erosion can minimize delay s du e to unforeseen ev ents. Protects w ater and air (dust) quality in the local community and red uces the ex posure of wo rkers to dust. 38 To minimize soil compaction, use construction equipment wi th longer reaches (i.e., equipment that can remain stationary , but operate ov er a larger radius/area). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May ha ve cost impl ications (use of larger equipment). May reduce site di sturbance and dust emissions. May increase construction schedule/ time to complete tasks. May reduce are as of site disturbance and potential dust emissions. 39 (continued on next page)

A -22 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimization Erosion and Sedimentation Control Establish provisions to retain concrete wastes onsite until they can be appropriately disposed or recycled. Excess or waste concrete must not be washed into the public way or any drainage system. Hardened waste concrete may be crushed and reused onsite, reducing costs of bringing new materials onsite. Ensures that concrete wastes are not carried away via runoff. May require additional space to accommodate concrete wastes. Protects water quality in the local community. 13 For tenant improvement projects, ensure that construction entrances are properly maintained and routine clean up is enforced; ensure that construction entrances are protected from public walkways. HNL Helps avoid cleanup costs. Ensures that soil, sand, gravel, and chemicals are not carried away via runoff, affecting plants and animals in receiving waterbodies. Maintaining stability and preventing erosion can minimize delays due to unforeseen events. Maintains public safety. Protects water quality in the local community. 38 Require hand excavation around existing underground utilities. May require more time and increase labor costs. May help avoid costs and project delays associated with utility pipe/cable disruptions. May help prevent erosion and protect water quality, minimizing disturbance. May require more time, but can prevent project delays associated with broken utility pipes and cables. May prevent power/water failures in the community and injuries to construction workers. 55 Site Disturbance Minimization Tree and Plant Protection Require each contractor to provide a plan to protect existing vegetation during all construction activities. Widely varies on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. May help prevent fines for removal of trees off-airport. Promotes awareness and protects the natural environment. May help prevent erosion and filter stormwater runoff. Reduces site disturbance, minimizing unforeseen project delays. Promotes internal awareness. Helps maintain aesthetic appeal. 55 Provide temporary fencing, barricades, and guards during construction to protect trees from damage above and below grade. PDX May cost less than removing trees and hauling them to landfills. Protects the natural environment. May help prevent erosion and filter stormwater runoff. Reduces site disturbance, minimizing unforeseen project delays. Helps maintain aesthetic appeal. 53 Protect root systems of trees from the following: damage from noxious materials in solution caused by runoff or spillage during mixing and placement of construction materials, or drainage from stored materials; flooding, erosion, or excessive wetting resulting from dewatering operations and compaction; unauthorized cutting, breaking, or skinning of roots and branches; and skinning and bruising of bark. PDX May cost less than removing trees and hauling them to landfills. May be a part of a Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure (SPCC) Plan and/or a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP). Protects the natural environment. May help prevent erosion and filter stormwater runoff. Reduces site disturbance, minimizing unforeseen project delays. Helps maintain aesthetic appeal. 53

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -23 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Site Disturbance Minimi za tion Tree and Plant Protection Where trenching for utilities is required wi thin drip lines, tunnel under or around roots by hand diggi ng or boring. Do not cut main lateral roots or tap roots ov er 1 inch in diameter. If necessary , cut smaller roots w ith sharp pruning instruments; do not break or chop. PDX May require more ti me and increase labor costs. May help av oid costs and project delay s associated wi th remo vi ng trees and hauling them to landfills and utility pipe/cable disruptions. May help prev ent erosion and protect wa ter qualit y, minimizing disturbance. May increas e time requirements due to care around ex isting trees. Will va ry based on th e number of trees w ithin the project area. Helps maintain aesthetic appeal. 53 Do not allow ex posed roots to dr y out before permanent backfill is placed; prov ide temporar y earth co ve r, or pack w ith peat moss and wr ap w ith burlap. Wa ter ex posed roots, maintain them in a moist env ironment, and temporarily support and protect them from damage until they are perm anently relo cated and cov ered wi th ba ckfil l. PDX May require more ti me and increase labor costs. May help av oid costs and project delay s associated wi th remo vi ng trees and hauling them to landfills. Protects the natural env ironment. Ma y help prev ent erosion and filter stormw ater runoff. May increas e time requirements due to care of ex isting trees. Will va ry based on the number of tree s lo ca ted wi thin the project area. Helps maintain aesthetic appeal. 53 Donate healthy plants and tree s remov ed during construction to the community . LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Ma y cost less than hauling plants and trees to landfills. Prev ents carbon diox ide from being released into the env ironment. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May help improv e the community 's view of the airport . 39 Prohibit burning of landscape wa ste. Require that all v egetation that has to be remov ed because of construction be chipped for mulching and composting or used for process fuel (if the full plant or tree cannot be relocated, sold, or donated inta ct) . SLC May reduce hau ling, disposal, and fuel costs for the contractor and reduce costs as so ciate d wi th purchasing and hauling topsoil on si te . Prev ents carbon diox ide from being released into the env ironment; ma y be reused on site to improv e plant/tree health and reduce irrigation needs. May redu ce erosion and offsite hauling. May av oid the need for mulch/erosion control materials to be brought onsite. To redu ce on si te h aul distances, chip v egetation at the si te or n ear the site of future use. Replant disturbed v egetation as soon as possible. Protects air quality in th e local communi ty . Mu lch could be donated to local residents/parks near the airport for use in landscaping. 2, 54, 58 Indoor Air Quality Indoor Ai r Quality (I AQ ) Ma nagement Dev elop and implement an IAQ Management Plan for the construction and pre-occupancy pha ses of the building. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 ORD Additional time and labor may be required to protect and clean v entilation sy stems and building spaces. Ex tends the lifespan of the HVAC sy stem, improv ing v entilation efficiency and reducing energy use. If contaminants remain, they may lead to ex pensiv e and complicated cleanup procedures. Reduces IAQ problems resulting fro m the co ns tr uct ion process. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Helps sustain the comfort and we ll-being of construction wo rkers and building occupants. 19, 64 (continued on next page)

A -24 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Indoor Air Quality Indoor Air Quality (IAQ) Management Appoint an IAQ Manager who will identify problems and mitigation methods. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May require additional staff training. Raises awareness. Ensures comprehension of tasks; allows for streamlined operations; identifying problems and providing quick mitigation will avoid delays. May improve air quality within buildings. May minimize worker exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 39 Protect stored onsite or installed absorptive materials, such as insulation, carpeting, ceiling tile, and gypsum wallboard, from moisture damage. Sequence the installation of materials to avoid contamination. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 HNL, ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Can help avoid purchasing new components due to moisture damage. If contaminated materials are installed, they may lead to expensive and complicated cleanup procedures. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Accomplished by traditional coverings/ shelter and packaging (if necessary). May reduce delays associated with the ordering/ transportation of new materials. Sequencing may require additional time and could delay the date of initial occupancy. Keeping materials pristine may reduce the duration of construction projects, minimizing temporary noise and traffic impacts on the local community. 2, 64 Replace all air filter media used during construction at least 2 weeks prior to building occupancy, subsequent to building flush-out. After construction ends and prior to occupancy, conduct a 2-week building flush-out with 100 percent outside air. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 ORD Additional time and labor may be required to protect and clean ventilation systems, but would extend the lifespan of the system, improving ventilation efficiency and reducing energy use. If contaminants remain, they may lead to expensive and complicated cleanup procedures. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. May delay occupancy by 2 weeks if not accounted for at the beginning of the project. May improve air quality within buildings. May minimize worker exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 19, 64 Limit or do not operate air-handling equipment during construction. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Extends the lifespan of the HVAC system, improving ventilation efficiency and reducing energy use. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. Filtration media used during construction should be replaced prior to building occupancy. May improve air quality within buildings. 19, 39, 64 If permanently installed air handlers are used during construction, filtration media with a Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value (MERV) of 8 must be used at each return air grill, as determined by ASHRAE 52.2-1999. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 Extends the lifespan of the HVAC system, improving ventilation efficiency and reducing energy use. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. Replace all filtration media immediately prior to occupancy. May improve air quality within buildings. May minimize worker's exposure to potentially harmful chemicals. 2 Filtration media installed at the end of construction shall have a MERV of 13, as determined by ASHRAE 52.2-1999. LEED® IEQ Credit 5 ORD Improves ventilation efficiency. May contribute to lowering health insurance rates and health care costs. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. Filtration should be applied to process both return and outside air to be delivered as supply air. May improve air quality within buildings. 19 During construction, isolate areas of work to prevent contamination of clean or occupied spaces. LEED® IEQ Credit 3.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Avoids costs associated with recleaning spaces or buying new materials. Extends the lifespan of the HVAC system, improving ventilation efficiency and reducing energy use. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. Avoids time associated with recleaning spaces or ordering/transporting new materials. May improve air quality within occupied areas, minimizing occupants' exposure to poor IAQ. 39, 64

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -25 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Indoor Air Quality Indoor Ai r Quality (I AQ ) Ma nagement Use v entilation sy stems ov ernight to purge the wo rk area. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Ma y increase energy costs. Reduces IAQ problems resulting fro m the co ns tr uct ion process. If construction hours are during the day , purging the area at night w ill not interfere wi th operations. May minimize wo rker's ex posure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 39 Communicate the hazards of IAQ during health and sa fe ty meeting s. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May contr ibute to lo we ring health insurance rates and healthcare costs. Promotes aw areness. Communicate with all of the appropriate people wo rking on the project. Promotes aw areness and internal communication. 39 Increase air mov ement in facilities by using ceiling fans during construction. ORD Ceiling fans may co st additional to purchase and install. Improv es IAQ during con struction. If ceiling fans are not part of the construction scope, additional time ma y be needed to install and remov e them. May minimize wo rker ex posure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 19 Use a desiccant dehumidifier to control moisture lev els during installation of interior finishes. This technology uses desiccant material to remov e humidity from the surrounding space. Can help av oid purchasing new components d ue to moisture damage. If contaminated materials are installed, they ma y lead to ex pensiv e and com plicated cleanup procedures. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the env ironmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. May reduce del ay s associated wi th ordering/transporting new materials. Keeping materials pristine may reduce the dur ation of construction projects, minimizing temporar y noise and traffic impacts on the local communi ty . 55 Use additional filtration to protect fresh air intake sources to keep construction dust from entering the building. BW I Ma y increase energy costs, but may also ex tend the lifespan of the HVAC sy stem, improv ing v entilation efficiency and reducing energy use. Reduces IAQ problems resulting fro m the co ns tr uct ion process. May reduce del ay s associated wi th ordering/transporting new materials. May impro ve air qu ality wi thin buildings. Ma y minimize wo rker ex posure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 60 Prohibit "bake-out" or "superheating" of sp ac es to accelerate the release of gaseous emissions. May damage buildi ng parts, requiring the purchase of new materials and additional labor costs. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the env ironmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Moisture from the air, and some vo latile gases, can condense on cooler sur faces. A "bake-out" may damage parts of the building (e.g., displacing concrete floor slabs, causing carpet and vi ny l flooring to buckle, cracking wi ndow s, wa rping w ood doors wa rped, etc.). May reduce del ay s associated wi th ordering/ transporting new material s. Keeping materials pristine may reduce the dur ation of construction projects, minimizing temporar y noise and traffic impacts on the local communi ty . 13 Indoor Air Quality Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control Use non-absorpti ve floo ring, wa lls, and fini sh ma terial s to resist mold growth. ORD May ha ve higher upfront costs; helps av oid additional costs as so ciate d wi th installing or replacing materials damaged by mold. May contribute to low ering health insurance rates and health care costs. Can reduce landfill hauls of damaged materials/ components. Also reduces the env ironmental impacts of producing new con str uction products and materials. May reduce futu re delay s associated wi th building maintenance and the ordering/transportation of new materials. Protects wo rker and occupant health. 2, 19 (continued on next page)

A -26 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Indoor Air Quality Indoor Chemical and Pollutant Source Control Only use nontoxic cleaning agents for cleaning activities. Minimal costs; may contribute to lowering health insurance rates and health care costs. Nontoxic cleaning supplies may be less harmful to the natural environment. Biodegradable and bio-based cleaning agents are available. Specifications may need to be established in project standards and procedures. Protects worker and occupant health. 2 Provide drains plumbed for appropriate disposal of liquid waste where water and chemical concentrate mixes. ORD May avoid future costs associated with cleanup or noncompliance, as regulated by local governmental agencies. Helps prevent chemicals from entering groundwater. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Protects worker and occupant health. 19 Ensure that interior construction operations are not scheduled when indoor air quality may be unacceptable. May contribute to lowering health insurance rates and healthcare costs. Improves IAQ during construction. May extend the duration of the project. Minimizes exposure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 43 Ensure proper ventilation, such as fume hoods, for activities that produce hazardous gasses. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May have higher upfront costs, but may also contribute to lowering health insurance rates and health care costs. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Limits worker exposure to hazardous or noxious fumes, vapors, or dusts. 39 During construction, prohibit the indoor use of combustion engine-based devices without direct exterior exhaust and make- up air. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May require renting or purchasing electrical or non-combustion equipment. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the construction process. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May minimize worker exposure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 39 Within interior spaces, do not use solvents that may penetrate and be retained in absorptive materials, such as concrete, gypsum board, wood, cellulose products, fibrous material, and textiles. Can help avoid the need to replace components damaged by moisture. If contaminated materials are installed, they may lead to expensive and complicated cleanup procedures. Can reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Specifications may need to be established in project standards and procedures. May reduce future delays associated with building maintenance and the ordering/transportation of new materials. May minimize worker exposure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 13 Pre-ventilate packaged dry products at least 48 hours prior to installation. Remove from packaging and ventilate in a secure, dry, well-ventilated space free from strong contaminant sources and residues. May have minor cost implications resulting from energy use. Reduces IAQ problems resulting from the installation of materials. Provide a temperature range of 60°F to 90°F continuously during the ventilation period. Do not ventilate within limits of work unless approved by the architect. May minimize worker exposure to hazardous indoor air pollutants. 13

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -27 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods Dust Control Dev elop and implement a Construction Dust Control Plan. The plan should document w ind patterns, including direction and ve locity ; show lo cations of disturbed soil; include BMPs that w ill be used for each disturbed soil location during each phase of construction; prov ide for BMP inspections and personnel training; and prov ide inspection and record- keeping forms, to be kept onsite wi th the Construction Dust Control Plan. The plan should also include a tracking protocol for implementation of the Construction Dust Control Plan. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Widely va ries on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Promotes aw areness. Adjust BMPs for dust control based on meteorological conditions and the activ it y lev el inv olving disturbed soil . Improv es road safety and reduces dust. Protects air qualit y in the local community . 39 For soil stockpiles or areas under acti ve construction, cov er soil during rainfall, high wi nds, and at night w ith plastic sheets or other cov er that can be easil y remov ed. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Minimal cost for covering materials. Helps control dust. Minimal time requirements; may require addi tional staff training. Improv es road safety and reduces dust. Protects air qualit y in the local community . 39 Wa ter dow n loose materials and ex posed earth (using non-potable wa ter) to reduce the potential for dust. Us e wa ter from on- airport detention basins, cisterns, or cree ks. ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May ha ve minor co st implications due to wa ter use and labor. Can prev ent erosion and the contamination of nearby wa ter source s. He lp s con trol dust. Consider the site topography and ge ology . Protects air quality in th e local community . R educes demand for potable wa ter. 2 Spray dow n truck w heel we lls (using non- potable wa ter) and use rumble strips before ex iting the construction site. Minimal additional costs. Helps prev ent tox ins, pollutants, and/or sediment from trav eling offsite and contaminating groundw ater. Use wa ter from on- airport detention basins, cisterns, or creeks. Protects air quality in th e local communi ty . 2 Perform regula r street sw eeping during con struction. Minimal additional costs for equipment and labor. Helps prev ent tox ins, pollutants, and/or sediment from trav eling offsite and contaminating groundw ater. Ma y temporarily increas e dust. To av oid temporary dust ex posure, schedule sw eeping before or after regular wo rk hours. Improv es road safety and reduces dust. 2 Install temporary fe ncing (cov ered) around the perimeter of the construction site to prev ent fugiti ve dust emission s. The installation of fencing wi th cov ering may hav e cost implications. Helps control dust. Minimal time requirements; may require addi tional staff training. Improv es road safety and reduces dust. Protects air qualit y in the local community . 2 Require haulers to cov er truck beds or maintain at least 2 feet of freeboard for dust suppression. Minimal cost for covering materials. May reduce th e size of hauls, potentially requiring additional v ehicle trip s. Helps control dust. Minimal time requirements; may require addi tional staff training. Protects air quality in th e local communi ty . 2 Restrict traffic flows to stabilized con struction roads. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces areas of site disturbance and potential mitigation requirem ents. Minimizes the amount of dust generated; promotes aw areness. May allo w for sa fe r operations. Improv es road safety and reduces dust. Protects air qualit y in the local community . 39 (continued on next page)

A -28 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Dust Control Use integral dust collection systems on drywall sanders, cutoff saws, and routers. May have higher upfront costs but may contribute to lowering health insurance rates and health care costs. Minimizes the accumulation of dust and other contaminants. May require additional staff training. Improves worker health. Protects air quality in the local community. 55 Use wet rags, damp mops, and vacuum cleaners with high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters to clean dust. May contribute to lowering health insurance rates and health care costs. May require additional labor. Minimizes the accumulation of dust and other contaminants. May be time consuming. Protects worker and occupant health. 55 Water/Wastewater Reduce Potable Water Use Use non-potable water or gray water for concrete mixing and aggregate wash down. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Storage tanks and cisterns may have a high upfront cost; reduces the cost of potable water use. Conserves potable water. Requires the approval of a licensed structural engineer. May improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. Conserves local and regional potable water supplies. 39 Use non-potable water or gray water for consolidation of backfill material around potable/non-potable pipelines. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Storage tanks and cisterns may have a high upfront cost; reduces the cost of potable water use. Conserves potable water. Requires the approval of a licensed structural engineer. May improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. Conserves local and regional potable water supplies. 39 Use non-potable water or gray water for irrigation of landscaping on construction sites. LEED® WE Credit 1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD A separate tank, filter, and special emitters may be necessary. Storage tanks and cisterns may have a high upfront cost. Conserves potable water. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. Conserves local and regional potable water supplies. 39 Consult state water recycling criteria to ensure that recycled water is treated correctly to achieve the appropriate level for the respective tasks. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May avoid future costs associated with non- compliance, as regulated by local governmental agencies. Helps prevent toxins, pollutants, and/or sediment from traveling off-site and contaminating groundwater. May require additional staff training. Ensures public safety. 39 If temporary irrigation is required, use drip or bubbler systems and rain sensor overrides. LEED® WE Credit 1 Higher initial cost; helps reduce water bills. Have lower maintenance requirements. Municipalities may offer rebates or incentives for water-efficient irrigation systems, dedicated water meters, and rain or moisture sensors. Conserves potable water. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Conserves local and regional potable water resources. 55, 64 Plant landscaping (non-wildlife attracting) that is native to the region, consistent with a xeriscaping approach. LEED® WE Credit 1 DEN Saves costs on landscaping (no watering labor or irrigation system is required). Requires less maintenance and fertilizer than turf grass. Conserves water. Native species require less fertilizer and pesticides, protecting water quality. Less maintenance is required for irrigation. Creates an aesthetically pleasing building site integrated with its natural surroundings. Conserves local and regional potable water resources. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -29 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Construction Methods W ater/ Wa stewater Water Use Reduction Collect and use reclaimed gray wa ter and/or har ve sted stormw ater for non- potable needs, such as sew age conv ey ance, v ehicle maintenance and wa shing, urinal and toilet flushing, cu st odial uses, etc. LEED® WE Credit 2 ORD Collection and use of rainw ater for non-potable wa ter applications has fe we r code requirements and associated costs than gray wa ter. Storage tanks and cisterns ma y hav e a high upfront cost. Reduces runoff. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May impro ve the community 's view of the airport if included in an outreach program . 19 Prov ide training for construction wo rkers and signage for facility user s on how th ey can help reduce wa ter use. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Costs of training and signage are minimal; education may lower wa ter use bills. Promotes aw areness. Conserv es wa ter. Requires staff training. Promotes internal aw areness and communication. 39 Install metering netw orks to facilitate accurate measurement of wa ter use. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Requires additional upfront cost. Promotes awareness, wh ich may reduce utili ty bills. Promotes aw areness. Conserv es wa ter. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Promotes internal aw areness, communication, and education. 39 Use and install high -efficiency produ cts certified by the US EPA WaterSense program (toilets, urinals, faucets, sinks, and wa shing machines). LEED® WE Credit 3 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps reduce wa ter bills; may ha ve a higher upfront cost. Conserv es wa ter. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Conserv es local and regional wa ter resources. May impro ve the community 's view of the airport if included in an outreach program . 39 Designate truck and v ehicle cleaning areas, but limit wa shdow n of v ehicle and equipment serv ice pads and other wo rk areas. Liquids from the se ac tiv ities shall be collected, managed as contaminated wa stew ater, and properly dispo sed. Helps av oid wa ter contamination cleanup costs. Promotes aw areness; prev ents tox ins, pollutants, and sediment from trav eling offsite and contaminating groundw ater. May allo w for sa fe r operations. Protects local and regional wa ter resources. 53 Limit steam cleaning and high pressure wa shing of v ehicles and equipment. PDX Helps reduce wa ter bills. Conserv es wa ter. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Conserv es local and regional wa ter re so urce s. 53 W ater/ Wa stewater Stor mw ater Management and Treatment Install biological filtration sy stems/constructed we tlands for stormw ater management that also function as ecological features and prov ide aesthetic benefits. LEED® WE Credit 2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps prev ent dam age from flooding. Prev ents tox ins, pollutants, and sediment from trav eling offsite and contaminating groundw ater. Must be designed/ installed to not attra ct wildlife. Prov ides aesthetic benefits. Protects wa ter qualit y in the local communi ty . 39 Construct dr y we lls, dry basin s, and/or perforated drain pipes to av oid creating inundated areas, wh ich attract w ildlife. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps prev ent dam age from flooding. Helps reduce the potential for flooding; prev ents to xi ns, pollutants, and sediment from trav eling off-site and contaminating groundw ater. Helps minimize the presence of w ildlife that may be hazardous to airport operations. Reduces w ildlife hazards. 39 (continued on next page)

A -30 Sustainable Airport Construction PracticesAppendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Construction Methods Water/Wastewater Stormwater Management and Treatment Install first-flush systems, including slotted edge drains connected to underground holding tanks. First- flush sediment would settle in the tanks and be removed at a later date for treatment and/or disposal. LEED® WE Credit 2 ORD May minimize wastewater treatment costs and help avoid water contamination cleanup costs. Prevents toxins, pollutants, and sediment from traveling offsite and contaminating groundwater. May require additional time/labor to install tanks underground. Protects water quality in the local community. 19 Install detention basins, detention ditches, and ditch checks for effective first-flush treatment. LEED® WE Credit 2 ORD Helps avoid water contamination cleanup costs. Prevents toxins, pollutants, and sediment from traveling offsite and contaminating groundwater. Must be designed/ installed to not attract wildlife. Protects water quality in the local community. 2 Install bioswales along roadways and parking areas to encourage groundwater infiltration of stormwater runoff. On airside projects, such bioswales must be designed so that they do not provide habitat for wildlife. LEED® WE Credit 2 May minimize wastewater treatment costs and help avoid water contamination cleanup costs. Helps treat stormwater; prevents toxins, pollutants, and sediment from traveling offsite and contaminating groundwater. Must be designed/ installed to not attract wildlife. Provides aesthetic benefits. Protects water quality in the local community. 2 Plant nitrogen-fixing vegetation (e.g., legumes) in fertilized areas. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May minimize wastewater treatment costs and help avoid water contamination cleanup costs. Helps fertilize soil to support plant life and prevent erosion. Must not attract wildlife. Provides aesthetic benefits. 39 Install curb breaks and drainage ditches where possible. Helps avoid water contamination costs. Helps prevent damage from flooding. Improves drainage. Helps minimize the presence of wildlife that may be hazardous to airport operations. Protects water quality in the local community. 2 Protect storm sewer inlets during construction by installing flexible inlet filters to fit a wide array of drainage structures and offer various levels of infiltration (e.g., FLEXSTORM inlet filters). Helps avoid fines and water contamination cleanup costs. Prevents siltation and pollution of rivers, lakes, and ponds. Helps satisfy the EPA’s NPDES Phase II directives. Reduces jobsite flooding and keeps projects running. Resists clogging and are easy to install and remove. Filter bags should typically be removed when they are more than half filled with sediment and debris. Prevent hazardous road icing conditions by eliminating ice buildup at curb inlets. 1

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -31 LEED® Research Team Co nsideration s Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Ex ample(s) Economic Env ironmental Operational Social Source (see reference below ) Logistics Scheduling Closely coordin ate deliv eries of construction materials wi th scheduled installation times to minimize v ehicle queue times. HNL, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Planning and coordinating the materials ordering processes on site prev ents cumulati ve ov er-ordering. It may reduce co sts associated wi th installing or replacing damaged materials, but could be more ex pensiv e since items are not ordered in bulk. Can increase transportation- related emissions if materials are not ordered in bulk (e.g ., se ve ral trip s). Consider potential w eather restraints (e.g., snow ) or terrain hazards and the delay s they may cause . May also reduce the size of the staging area and materials storage areas. May add to local community traffi c if thi s practice increases the number of deliv eries on a project lev el. 39 Use "just in time" deliv er y of construction materials to reduce staging requirements and to prev ent re-ordering of materials. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May av oid damage that comes from storage or mo ve ment of materials. Sav es costs associated wi th the re-ordering of supplies. Can reduce material costs by ordering only wh at is needed but may increase transportation costs if supplies are not ordered in bulk; the personnel in charge of ordering con struction materials should identify wh ic h materials make the most economic sense to be ordered in bulk and wh ich should be ordered "just in time." Can increase transportation- related emissions if supplies are not ordered in bulk (e.g ., se ve ral trip s). Redu ce s the env ironmental impacts of hav ing to produce and haul re-ordered materials or return ex cess ma teria ls. Consider potential w eather restraints (e.g., snow ) or terrain hazards and the delay s they may cause . May also reduce the size of the staging area and minimize impacts on airport activ ities. May add to local community traffi c if thi s practice increases the number of deliv eries on a project lev el. 39 For trades or materials w here “just in time” deliv eries cannot be set up, prov ide for suitable, safe, and secure storage so that damage during storage and mov es is av oided. The cost of safe and protected storage space is potentially offse t by prev enting the need to re- order materials that we re damaged. May increase the amount of imperv ious surface. Consider using and/or modify ing ex isting spaces if the duration of storage is minim al. May reduce del ay s associa te d wi th the ordering/transportation of new materials. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 66 Packaging/Delivery Methods Reduce packaging wa ste through v endor participation using bulk packaging techniques or choose products wi th minimal or no packaging. May reduce pro duct/ material costs by using fe we r packaging ma terials. Consider additional transportation requirements, material handling, storage requirements, and costs/ risk of damage. Reduces packaging wa ste, env ironmental impacts from transportation of waste, and impacts to landfills. Consider storage requirements and material handling requirements to reduce damage. Reduced transportation of materials/products and packaging wa ste lo we rs the impact of deliv er y vehicles on local communities. 55 (continued on next page)

A -32 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Logistics Packaging/Delivery Methods Ask suppliers to deliver supplies using reusable delivery containers or sturdy returnable pallets and containers. Have suppliers pick up pallets and empty containers. May reduce product/ material costs by using fewer packaging materials. Consider additional transportation requirements, storage requirements, and costs/ risk of damage. Consider trade-off of reduced packaging impacts but increasing transportation impacts. Consider storage requirements and material handling requirements to reduce damage. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Purchase precut and prefabricated components when available and order materials to size. Component costs may be higher, but may allow for just-in-time construction processes, reducing construction schedule and costs, including material transportation costs. Reduces raw material waste at the construction site. Reduces material hauls, which reduces emissions and the requirement for fossil fuel use. Enables just-in-time construction techniques. Reduces the impact of delivery vehicles on local streets. 55 Use easily stackable units, such as cladding systems, curtain walls, steel beams, etc. Reduces transportation costs. Reduces transportation impacts. Reduces packaging waste, environmental impacts from transportation, and impacts to landfills. Consider storage requirements and material handling requirements to reduce damage. Reduced transportation of materials/products and packaging waste lowers the impact of delivery vehicles on local communities. 55 Encourage alternative sustainable packaging techniques (e.g., metal strapping rather than shrink-wrap, paper packaging rather than plastic, and shredded paper rather than foam). Alternative packaging may reduce costs. Consider additional transportation requirements, material handling, storage requirements, and costs/ risk of damage. May reduce packaging waste or environmental impact of packaging waste (i.e., packaging waste can be recycled, reused, or is biodegradable), reduces environmental impacts from transportation of waste, and reduces impacts to landfills. Consider storage requirements and material handling requirements to reduce damage. Reduced transportation of materials/products and packaging waste lowers the impact of delivery vehicles on local communities. Reduces impact on local landfills by using recyclable or biodegradable products. 55 Adopt a "first-in, first-out" policy to prevent finish materials from becoming outdated. The first materials delivered to the site should be the first ones used onsite. Avoids cost of replacing spoiled or outdated materials. Reduces waste from spoilage. Reduces transportation impacts of removing spoiled materials and delivering replacement materials. Consider placement of materials and work flow to ensure compliance with policy. Reduced transportation lowers the impact of delivery vehicles and waste haulers on local communities. 55 Use an overland conveyor system in construction to transport materials from stockpile areas; if possible, use communal conveying systems. Trade-off with costs associated with truck transportation of materials. Reduces transportation requirement, thereby reducing emissions and the requirement for fossil fuel use. Helps minimize energy consumption during construction and reduces site traffic and noise. Use a conveyance system for projects requiring significant grading changes. May improve logistics and security. 2, 18, 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -33 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Develop and implement an energy conservation/efficiency plan. Depending on scope, may require some up-front cost to implement (e.g., new equipment); typically results in operational savings, reducing energy costs. Reduces energy consumption. Environmental benefits will vary based on local source of electricity (i.e., coal, natural gas, nuclear, renewable, etc.). Depending on scope, may require operational changes and training of employees and contractors. May reduce energy demand and costs in the local community. 2 Install freight elevators as early as possible and coordinate building enclosure at the elevator shafts to minimize temporary hoisting needs. Minimizes cost associated with leasing temporary hoisting equipment. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Consider timing of the change from using temporary hoisting equipment to using freight elevators. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use alternating current gearless elevators. Saves electricity by lowering power consumption by about 40 percent. Reduces power consumption, thereby reducing emissions. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce energy demand and costs in the local community. 55 Install Energy Star certified products for temporary and permanent building equipment. Categories include appliances, electronics, office equipment, lighting, food services, and other commercial products. LEED® EACredit 1 Depending on scope, may require some up-front cost to implement (e.g., new equipment); typically results in operational savings, reducing energy costs. Reduces energy consumption. Environmental benefits will vary based on local source of electricity (i.e., coal, natural gas, nuclear, renewable, etc.). No applicable Research Team Consideration. May reduce energy demand and costs in the local community. 55 Use localized hot water equipment rather than centralized equipment; localized equipment is typically more efficient than centralized equipment. Eliminates long piping runs and heat losses associated with recirculation piping. May require higher initial costs for localized equipment, but may provide cost savings in materials and energy use. Reduces energy consumption due to heating losses; uses fewer materials and resources. Domestic hot water for general plumbing fixtures should be designed for a temperature between 120°F and 140°F. May reduce energy demand and costs in the local community. 55 Use solar hot water heat or instantaneous hot water heat in construction trailers for heating and cooling. Eliminates cost associated with running pipes from centralized hot water systems. Eliminates cost associated with heating water even when it is unused. Reduces energy consumption due to heating losses; uses fewer materials and resources. Instantaneous or "demand" water heaters heat water directly without the use of a storage tank to avoid the standby heat losses associated with conventional storage tank water heaters. May reduce energy demand and costs in the local community. 18, 48 Use a global positioning system (GPS) based earthmover to enable machines to get to grade with fewer passes. Requires less fuel and incurs less wear, thereby reducing costs. Limits ground disturbance to intended and specified areas. More efficient use of labor and equipment, reducing project duration. Improves safety. 55 (continued on next page)

A -34 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Prior to placing concrete or asphalt, create a “spatial image” or “digital scan” of the area, plotting three-dimensional points every few millimeters. Laser scanning helps obtain accurate pre-and post-construction terrain models for determination of earthwork quantities, monitoring pavement smoothness and adherence to grade design, and monitoring ground movement near excavations, large embankments, or pile- driving operations. ORD Increases the accuracy of measurements, improving productivity and layout work. Helps determine the amount of earthwork required, reducing unnecessary haul trips and the associated emissions. Helps meet specified requirements for levelness and flatness. A scan typically takes 5 to 20 minutes to complete. Scanned images can also be imported into computer assisted drawing software to aid in design work. To obtain more accurate information, the instrument can be placed higher off the ground or even on an aircraft. Scans can be completed in total darkness. May enhance safety by improving precision and reducing the duration of construction projects. 45 Use a machine-integrated laser infrastructure system that provides precise elevation information on an in-cab display to achieve accurate blade positioning. Helps achieve grade faster and in fewer passes, reducing fuel consumption and operating costs. Does not require the expense of grade stakes, grade checkers, or stake-setting surveyors. May reduce fuel consumption, reducing construction vehicle emissions. Reduces delay times associated with airfield construction. May enhance safety by improving precision and reducing the duration of construction projects. 14 Use digital imaging and ground penetrating radar signal analysis to help predict the initiation and propagation of reflective pavement cracking. May have a high upfront cost but may avoid unexpected and potentially high costs and operational delays. Improves mapping accuracy of underground voids and the groundwater table. Helps identify the severity of pavement cracking and the level of maintenance required to improve the surface. Helps predict future repaving and restructuring projects. May improve safety by identifying deep surface penetrations and weak pavement areas. 4 Install a reinforcing and stress absorbing membrane interlayer system under the asphalt overlay to delay reflective cracking. Interlayer systems are typically comprised of geosynthetics, geocomposite, steel reinforcement netting, and polymer-modified fine hot-mix asphalt. Provides cost savings over the life cycle of the pavement; reduces pavement maintenance costs. Less frequent maintenance reduces energy and emissions from repaving/resurfacing equipment. Reduces the severity and rate of reflective cracking, reducing the frequency of pavement resurfacing and restructuring; reduces delay times associated with airfield construction. May improve safety by preventing deep surface penetrations and weak pavement areas. 4

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -35 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Energy Conservation and Alternative Energy Install pipes with acoustic measuring devices to detect vibrations and/or sound waves in pipelines, indicating defects. Three types of acoustic technologies are used for pipeline assessment: leak detectors, which are used to detect the acoustic signals emitted by pipeline leaks; acoustic monitoring systems, which are used to evaluate the condition of prestressed concrete cylinder pipe (PCCP) by detecting the signals emitted by breaking prestressed wires; and sonar, or ultrasonic systems, which emit high frequency sound waves and measure their reflection to detect a variety of pipe defects. This technology works on all pipes, including plastic/polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and eliminates the high cost and difficulty of use traditionally associated with leak noise correlators. May incur higher initial costs; however, the higher cost offsets the risk of damage created by defective pipes. Reduces risk of water loss or contamination due to damaged or faulty pipes. Helps identify pipeline defects and the level of maintenance required; enhances safety and prevents delays from pipeline failure. May help avoid pipeline failures that could cause air and/or water pollution in the local community. 55 Use appropriately sized equipment for the project. Lease if not currently owned. Oversized equipment may cost more than necessary for the job. Oversized equipment uses more energy than required for the job and may cause erosion. Fully understand job requirements, with appropriate contingency, to properly specify equipment requirements. May reduce noise impacts on surrounding land uses. 10 Use alternative fuels (biodiesel, ethanol, compressed natural gas, propane, hydrogen) in an onsite batch plant. Costs vary based on local availability. It may be necessary to install retrofits for specific types of fuels. Alternative fuels have fewer emissions than gas or diesel. Emissions from gas and diesel are the leading causes of air quality issues, leading to heart and lung disease, asthma, etc. Consider retrofit and maintenance requirements associated with the selected alternative fuel. May help improve air quality, decreasing health impacts on local communities. Use of alternative fuels helps reduce carbon emissions and climate change. 7 Use solar-powered flashers instead of flashers requiring batteries. Solar- powered flashers require no maintenance, are automatically powered, and save money by eliminating the need to recycle batteries. Solar-powered flashers cost approximately $6 more than regular flashers, but the payback period may be only 2 months. DAL, RBD Initial costs may be higher than for battery-powered flashers; however, solar- powered flashers require minimal maintenance, are automatically recharged, and reduce costs by eliminating the need to recharge or replace. Reduces the need to replace nonrechargeable batteries and the environmental impact of battery disposal. Eliminates the need to use the grid to recharge batteries. Eliminates labor to recharge and/or replace batteries. Depending on the environment, may require occasional cleaning to ensure proper charging. May not be appropriate for environment with little sunlight due to weather conditions or geography. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 51 (continued on next page)

A -36 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Lighting Establish a schedule for when construction lighting is required and develop a policy to reduce lighting when not needed. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces energy costs. Reduces light emissions and energy consumption. Requires that employees and contractors are trained on lighting and are incentivized (if necessary) to follow procedures. Reduces light emissions on surrounding communities and adjacent land uses. 39 Specify strict site lighting criteria and update periodically in conjunction with seasonal daylight fluctuations to maintain safe light levels while avoiding offsite lighting and night sky pollution. LEED® SSCredit 8 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces energy costs. Reduces light emissions and energy consumption. Requires that employees and contractors are trained on lighting and are incentivized (if necessary) to follow procedures. Reduces light emissions on surrounding communities and adjacent land uses. 39 Require the use of energy efficient lamps for temporary lights and temporary emergency lighting that can be turned off during nonworking hours to conserve energy. May incur higher initial costs; however, bulbs typically last longer, requiring less frequent changes and cost less to operate. Longer lasting bulbs mean less waste and disposal. However, some energy efficient lamps contain trace amounts of mercury and must be disposed of properly. Reduces the need to change bulbs and creates better lighted work environments. Must train employees and contractors on proper disposal of lighting. Be sure that lighting is properly enclosed in work areas to reduce breakage. Better lighting may improve safety. 55 Reduce construction at night to minimize lighting impacts and improve safety. If construction at night is necessary, focus lighting toward the earth. LEED® SSCredit 8 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reducing nighttime construction typically reduces project costs. Reduces nighttime light emissions. Reduces the complexity of the construction site. Reduces light emissions on surrounding communities and adjacent land uses. 39 Monitor interior and exterior lighting systems regularly during construction to maintain proper illumination and minimize offsite impacts. Ensure that the maximum candela value of all interior lighting falls within the building (not out through windows) and the maximum candela value of all exterior lighting falls within the property. LEED® SSCredit 8 ORD May reduce lighting costs. Reduces light emissions and energy consumption. Proper illumination improves construction worker safety and site security. May reduce light emissions on surrounding communities and adjacent land uses. 19 Use full cutoff luminaries, low-reflectance, non-specular surfaces, low-angle spotlights, and/or shielding for roadway and building lighting. LEED® SSCredit 8 ORD May require higher initial costs. Reduces light emissions on adjacent land uses. Proper illumination improves construction worker safety and site security. May reduce light emissions on surrounding communities and adjacent land uses. 19 Designate specific recycling areas for light bulbs that contain mercury. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Ensures that mercury from spent light bulbs is captured and properly recycled. Communicate recycling procedures with all of the appropriate people working on the project. Ensures that mercury from spent light bulbs is captured and properly recycled. 3 Install recyclable lamps and provide recycling information for all luminaries. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May increase costs of temporary construction lighting. Reduces environmental impact of temporary construction lighting. Communicate recycling procedures with all of the appropriate people working on the project. Promotes awareness and may help improve the community's view of the airport; good for public relations. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -37 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Lighting Where acceptable, use high pressure sodium (HPS) lamps instead of metal halide (MH) lamps; HPS lamps produce more lumens per watt, have less mercury content per lamp, and have a greater average rated life expectancy than MH lamps. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May incur higher initial costs; however, bulbs typically last longer, requiring less frequent changes, and cost less to operate. Longer lasting bulbs reduce waste. Some energy efficient lamps contain trace amounts of mercury and must be disposed of properly. Reduces the need to change bulbs and creates better lighted work environments. Must train employees and contractors on proper disposal of lighting. Be sure that lighting is properly enclosed in work areas to reduce breakage. Better lighting may improve safety. 39 Use and install high frequency electronic ballasts with fluorescent 2-, 4-, and 8-foot tubular lamps. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May incur higher initial costs. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Proper illumination improves construction worker safety and site security. Better lighting may improve safety. 39 Use and install compact fluorescent light bulbs in lieu of incandescent lamps, especially in areas with low ceiling heights and minimal light requirements. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May incur higher initial costs; however, bulbs typically last longer, requiring less frequent changes, and cost less to operate. Longer lasting bulbs reduce waste. Some energy efficient lamps contain trace amounts of mercury and must be disposed of properly. Reduces the need to change bulbs and creates better lighted work environments. Must train employees and contractors on proper disposal of lighting. Be sure that lighting is properly enclosed in work areas to reduce breakage. Better lighting may improve safety. 39 Avoid using fluorescent, compact fluorescent, and light-emitting diode (LED) lights that contain mercury (as well as electrical switches and thermostats). May reduce disposal costs. Mercury is highly toxic and could cause poisoning if ingested or inhaled. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Improves health and safety of installers and building occupants. 55 Use and install metal halide lamps, low- temperature fluorescents, and/or solar- powered fixtures for exterior lighting. May incur higher initial costs; however, bulbs typically last longer, requiring less frequent changes, and cost less to operate. Longer lasting bulbs reduce waste. Some energy efficient lamps contain trace amounts of mercury and must be disposed of properly. Reduces the need to change bulbs. Solar fixtures can be installed in remote locations. Must train employees and contractors on proper disposal of lighting. Be sure that lighting is properly enclosed in work areas to reduce breakage. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 (continued on next page)

A -38 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Systems Commissioning Develop and use a systems commissioning plan. Establish systems commissioning requirements consistent with sustainable design to ensure optimal performance of systems and complete a summary systems commissioning report. LEED® EA Prerequ isite LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces energy use, improves building documentation, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Most effective when begun at project inception since it involves the project owner, users, occupants, operations and maintenance staff, design professionals, and contractors. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. May improve occupant productivity. 39, 64 Early on, identify an individual to lead the commissioning process. The commissioning authority should review and oversee the completion of commissioning process activities, have documented experience in at least two building projects, and be independent of the project design and construction management team. LEED® EA Prerequ isite 1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces energy use, improves building documentation, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. May improve occupant productivity. 64 Incorporate commissioning requirements into construction documents. Have a contract in place to implement best practice commissioning procedures and tie payment to completion of the contract. LEED® EA Prerequ isite 1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces energy use, improves building documentation, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. May improve occupant productivity. 64 Review the design intent and the basis of design documentation for proper systems commissioning. LEED® EA Prerequ isite 1 ORD Reduces energy use, improves building documentation, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. May improve occupant productivity. 19 Provide the airport operator with a single manual that contains the information required for recommissioning systems. LEED® EA Prerequ isite 1 ORD Lowers costs for recommissioning, expediting the process. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Expedites recommissioning. Promotes internal awareness. 19 Engage a commissioning team that does not include individuals directly responsible for project design or construction management to evaluate both building and site systems as part of the commissioning plan. LEED® EA Prerequ isite 1 ORD Reduces energy use, improves building documentation, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. May improve occupant productivity. 19 Establish and follow systems commission requirements for runway lighting and illuminated signage, runway navigational aids, runway site lighting systems, traffic signals, pump stations, and oil/water separators. ORD Reduces energy use, lowers operating costs, and reduces contractor callbacks. Improves energy efficiency, reducing emissions from the use of fossil fuels. Helps verify that the systems perform in accordance with the owner's project requirements. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 19

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -39 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Equipment Maintenance Require contractors to submit a pre- construction plan to use recycled oil, nontoxic lubricants, and other environmentally friendly maintenance agents during construction. The plan should also stipulate when and how used oil can be recycled. HNL; LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Costs vary widely on detail and goals; less so as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Reduces requirement for disposal of used oil. Reduces environmental impact associated with drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Must educate employees and contractors, establish procurement policies and procedures, implement procedures for recycling oil. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 2, 38, 39 Contain and clean all chemical spills properly and dispose of clean up supplies properly. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Initial costs to establish safeguards offset risks and costs associated with cleanup of chemical spills. Reduces risk of soil and groundwater contamination from chemical spills. Must educate employees and contractors and implement procedures for cleanup of chemical spills and proper disposal of cleanup supplies. Reduces risk of negative impact on surrounding communities caused by contamination of soil and groundwater. 39 Conduct maintenance activities under cover from precipitation. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Initial costs associated with maintenance hangar mitigate risk of soil and groundwater contamination. Reduces risk of soil and groundwater contamination from chemical spills. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces risk of negative impact on surrounding communities caused by contamination of soil and groundwater. 39 Maintain current Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) onsite. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Minimal cost to distribute MSDS offsets risks and costs associated with cleanup of chemical spills. Reduces risk of soil and groundwater contamination from chemical spills. Create awareness of existence and purpose of MSDS. Reduces risk of negative impact on surrounding communities caused by contamination of soil and groundwater. 39 Have floor drains in vehicle maintenance areas discharge into an oil-water separator to capture oil and other contaminants. The separator should be periodically pumped, and the oil processed for recycling. SLC Initial costs associated with drainage and separators; mitigates the risk of soil and groundwater contamination. Reduces risk of soil and groundwater contamination from chemical spills. Educate employees and contractors. Establish procedures and a schedule for cleaning the separator. Reduces risk of negative impact on surrounding communities caused by contamination of soil and groundwater. 58 Send end-of-life diesel engines to a remanufacturing plant to be reconstructed into methane-fueled generator sets. These generator sets convert methane from animal waste into usable energy. Remanufacturing plants may offer to pick up old engines for free, saving costs associated with the transport and/or landfill of end-of-life equipment. May reduce landfill waste, consumption of iron ore, and reduce GHG emissions caused by disposing end-of- life equipment. Methane generator sets provide renewable electricity and reduce GHG emissions. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 49 (continued on next page)

A -40 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Emissions Reduction Conduct an emissions inventory for all construction activities based on known emissions sources, or based on land use if details are not available. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Depending on scope of project, emissions inventory may be fairly costly to conduct. Helps identify emission sources and where mitigation efforts should be concentrated to reduce emissions. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Helps identify emission sources and where mitigation efforts should be concentrated to reduce emissions. 39 Identify efficient construction scheduling and operations to mitigate air emissions. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May have schedule implications. May reduce total emissions over varying periods of time (daily or annually). May result in extending construction schedule to minimize emissions on a daily or annual basis. May reduce total emissions. 39 Use ultra low sulfur diesel (ULSD) fuel in all construction vehicles. ORD May increase fuel costs due to lower fuel economy during transition period. Older vehicles may require additional maintenance. Reduces emission of air pollutants, such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Stipulate that the use of ULSD is a mandatory airport practice. Monitor the performance of older vehicles for potential fuel system leaks or premature fuel filter plugging during the change-over to ULSD fuel. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 2, 18 Use biodiesel and/or other alternative fuels in construction vehicles. STL Fuel costs may be higher. Fuel costs may also increase due to lower fuel economy. Retrofits may be required depending on alternative fuel selected. Incentives may be offered. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Reduces fuel consumption and environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Ensure an adequate, local supply of selected alternative fuel. Monitor the performance of older vehicles for potential fuel system leaks or premature fuel filter plugging. Biodiesel should not be used in vehicles manufactured pre-1993. A blend of at least 20 percent biodiesel, 80 percent diesel can be partially counted as an alternative fuel under the Energy Policy Act of 1992. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 2 Require that at least a portion of the construction vehicle fleet is hybrid/electrical and/or incorporate clean air technologies; also consider alternative fuels in shuttle buses and other onroad vehicles. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May reduce overall fuel costs due to lower fuel consumption. Alternative fuel costs may be higher. Alternative fuels also increase costs due to lower fuel economy. Retrofits may be required depending on alternative fuel selected. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Reduces fuel consumption and environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Ensure adequate local supply of selected alternative fuel. Maintain an inventory of all installed retrofit equipment/emissions reductions to ensure that goals/guidelines are achieved and for documentation and/or marketing purposes. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -41 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Emissions Reduction If appropriate, use diesel-electric hybrid bulldozers to burn less fuel and consume fewer parts and fluids over the lifetime of the equipment. ORD An electric drive system enables the operator to move approximately 25 percent more material per gallon of fuel consumed compared to conventional mid-sized bulldozers. The electric drive train configuration has fewer moving parts, requiring less service and replacement than conventional transmissions, extending the drive train component life and reducing lifetime operating costs. Diesel-electric bulldozers consume 10-30 percent less fuel per hour than conventional mid-sized bulldozers, reducing GHG’s by 10-30 percent. Movement of the cab is also quieter. The engine is beltless which helps reduce the frequency of maintenance; oil and filter change intervals are twice as long. Ensure that operators are properly trained on the new technology. Improves local air quality. 25, 36 Replace aging construction equipment with new low emission models when available and technically feasible. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Consider lower operating costs of new equipment and payback in relation to remaining useful life of older equipment. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Maintain an inventory of all installed retrofit equipment/emissions reductions to ensure that goals/guidelines are achieved and for documentation and/or marketing purposes. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 Install retrofits on existing construction equipment that allow for the use of alternative fuels. ORD Initial cost for retrofit may be offset by lower life cycle costs. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Reduces fuel consumption and environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 10 Install low emission engines (re-engine) into old equipment chasses. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Lower investment than a new vehicle. Keeps the chassis from entering the waste stream. New engines are typically more fuel efficient with lower emissions. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 (continued on next page)

A -42 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Emissions Reduction Install particulate filters and/or diesel oxidation catalysts on construction vehicles. The equipment should be included on the USEPA's Verified Retrofit Technology List (www.epa.gov/otaq/retrofit/retroverifiedlist .htm) or verified by the California Air Resources Board (CARB) (www.arb.ca.gov/diesel/verdev/v erdev.htm). SLC, ORD May require investment to upgrade vehicles and equipment. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 18 Develop a vehicle inspection program to ensure that pollution control devices are in place. SLC, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Establish penalties for noncompliance and present guidelines to contractors prior to project start. Consider cost of inspection process, offset by risk of noncompliance. Emphasizes the importance of meeting sustainability requirements. Compliance ensures realization of requirements established in contracts. Reduces emissions. Clarify requirements up front. Maintain an inventory of all installed retrofit equipment/ emissions reductions to ensure that goals/ guidelines are achieved and for documentation and/or marketing purposes. Compliance ensures realization of air quality benefits established in contracts. 2, 39 Perform routine maintenance and engine rebuilds to maintain original construction vehicle emission levels. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Should be considered part of normal operating cost, not incremental. Requires only routine maintenance and rebuilds, maximizes useful life of the vehicle, and maintains operating efficiency. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 Require all construction vehicles to meet the state's voluntary or future low emission vehicle standards. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May require investment to upgrade vehicles and equipment that do not meet the standards. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 Develop a Tier compliant and retrofit program for construction vehicles (e.g., retrofit all pre-Tier, Tier 1, and Tier 2 construction vehicles). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May require investment to upgrade vehicles and equipment. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Provide retrofit allowances for construction equipment. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -43 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Emissions Reduction Implement proposed Tier 4 emission standards to encourage the use of newer and/or retrofitted nonroad diesel equipment. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Consider cost of inspection process, offset by risk of noncompliance. Reduces emission of air pollutants such as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Maintain an inventory of all installed retrofit equipment/emissions reductions to ensure that goals/guidelines are achieved and for documentation and/or marketing purposes. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 Place signage (magnetic stickers) on alternative/ULSD fuel and retrofitted construction vehicles (e.g., "Low-Impact Construction Vehicle," or "This Construction Vehicle Runs on Biofuels"). ORD Marginal costs for signage. Creates awareness of environmental focus and benefits. Develop procedures for verifying and inspecting vehicles. Creates awareness in the community of specific actions the airport operator is taking to reduce the impact of airport construction. 3 Encourage contractors to carry double hauls when leaving the site. MSP May reduce hauling costs. Ensure that roadways can support the additional weight and the potential for erosion is negligible. No applicable Research Team Consideration. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 30 Construction Vehicles Reduced Vehicle Idling Install anti-idling technology to reduce/eliminate idling, such as Temp-A- Start (www.tempastart.com) automatic engine start/stop technology for diesel engines. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Technology may have an initial cost; however, less idling reduces fuel consumption and costs. May reduce required maintenance service. Reduces emissions, fuel consumption, and the environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Temp-A-Start maintains engine oil temperature and provides for driver comfort. Ensure operators are properly trained on anti- idling technologies. Reduces noise pollution. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39, 57 Ensure that construction activities do not require significant vehicle idling times. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Lowers fuel costs. Reduces emissions, fuel consumption, and the environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. Plan construction activities to reduce staging time of construction equipment. Reduces noise pollution. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 Ensure that no construction vehicles idle within 100 feet of a sensitive receptor area, such as air intakes. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May require minimal costs for signage and compliance; fines could be established to support the initiative. Reduces IAQ pollution. In coordination with Public Works, post signage for "no idling" areas in construction areas. Implement Vehicle Idling Program inspection logs. Reduces noise pollution. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 39 (continued on next page)

A -44 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Reduced Vehicle Idling In coordination with public works, post signage for "no idling" areas in construction areas. DEN, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Marginal costs for signage. Reduces emissions, fuel consumption, and the environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. In coordination with Public Works, post signage for "no idling" areas in construction areas. Implement Vehicle Idling Program inspection logs. Reduces noise pollution. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 9, 39 Turn off construction vehicles if they will be left idle for over an established time limit, e.g., 3 minutes. BWI, ORD Lowers fuel costs. In general, 10 seconds of idling uses more fuel than restarting a car. Reduces emission of such air pollutants as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. Reduces fuel consumption and environmental impact of drilling, pumping, transporting, and refining crude oil. An idling engine does not run at peak efficiency, which results in incomplete combustion of fuel, residue on spark plugs, and dirty engine oil. According to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), fuel injection engines do not need to be warmed up for more than 30 seconds except on extremely cold days (below 0°F). Reduces noise pollution. Improves local air quality. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter, including asthma, bronchitis, and heart and lung disease. Reduces emission of greenhouse gases. 19, 41, 60 Place air fresheners in construction vehicles promoting an “engines-off” campaign. The air fresheners could be mounted after performing routine maintenance. DEN Marginal cost to build awareness. Easily offset by fuel savings. Reduces emission of such air pollutants as particulate matter, dirt, nitrous oxides, hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces health impacts associated with diesel particulate matter. 9 Construction Vehicles Construction Traffic Control Require detailed site access plans for all milestone stages of work that minimize impervious site effects during construction. Costs are minimized as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Minimizes site impacts. May require staff training. Promotes internal awareness, communication and education. 55 Share construction equipment with other contractors. List equipment available for use on a communal website, display boards/posters, and/or hold a meeting with all contractors to discuss available equipment. May reduce equipment leasing costs or the number of contractors required to own or lease equipment, who would pass that cost on to the airport operator. Reduces transportation requirement and related costs. Must consider cost sharing agreements and liability issues. Reduces transportation requirement, thereby reducing emissions and the requirement for fossil fuel use. Requires greater logistical coordination between contractors, which could negatively affect schedule. Consider liability issues. Reduces the impact of delivery vehicles on local streets. May negatively affect jobs at equipment manufacturers. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -45 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Construction Traffic Control Implement an unrestricted flow of traffic control information between the contractor(s), the Construction Coordination Office, and the public. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Costs are minimized as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Minimizes site impacts. Communicate with all of the appropriate people working on the project. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion; promotes awareness. 39 Coordinate with the appropriate state/local transportation services to evaluate potentially vulnerable roadway areas and avoid damage from construction. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Costs are minimized as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Minimizes site impacts. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Promotes awareness and protects local roadways. 39 Work with local radio affiliates to include construction updates during morning and afternoon traffic alerts. Announce construction traffic reports on local AM radio stations. ORD Costs are minimized as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Increases awareness and compliance with noise and traffic control measures. Requires close coordination between contractors, the airport, and the public. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. Communication helps to prepare the community, reducing negative consequences of public backlash. 27 Release a construction project outlook report at the start of the construction season to local media outlets to provide advanced notice of any modifications to existing streets and intersections and provide information regarding truck haul routes in use. ORD Costs are minimized as it becomes part of standard operating procedures. Increases awareness and compliance with noise and traffic control measures. Minimal time requirements. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. Communication helps to prepare the community, reducing negative consequences of public backlash. 27 Publish a landside construction awareness brochure for construction- related roadways closures, access routes, detours, etc. ORD Marginal impact compared to the risk of negative public perception. Increases awareness and compliance with noise and traffic control measures. Minimal time requirements. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. Communication helps to prepare the community, reducing negative consequences of public backlash. 27 Publish an airfield construction awareness brochure highlighting runway and taxiway closures due to construction activity. ORD Marginal impact compared to risk of negative public perception and impact to air traffic/airlines and on-time departures and arrivals. Provides advanced notification of airfield closures, potential delays, and construction noise. Provide alternatives to ensure that airline traffic operates as efficiently as possible within the constraints imposed by construction. Minimizes impact to airline traffic. Allows airlines and ground crews to plan ahead. 27 Display construction traffic information on signage near the airport. ORD Marginal impact compared to risk of negative public perception. Creates awareness; reduces traffic congestion. Ensure proper placement of signage to provide advanced notification so that motorists can plan accordingly. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. Communication helps to prepare the community, reducing negative consequences of public backlash. 27 (continued on next page)

A -46 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Construction Vehicles Construction Traffic Control Immediately repair any construction- related roadway damage. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Left untreated, roadway damage will cost more to repair later. Minimizes risk of vehicle damage and personal injury. May temporarily increase vehicle emissions and noise but could reduce the potential for more complex repairs. Provide appropriate signage before and during repairs. Enhances roadway safety; prevents damage to vehicles. 39 Limit traffic and staging locations to areas that will be paved. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps avoid water contamination cleanup costs and landscaping repairs. May help prevent soil compaction and erosion. Ensures that soil, sand, gravel, and chemicals are not carried away via runoff. Communicate with all of the appropriate people working on the project. Minimizes health impacts caused by dust and particulate matter. 39 Clearly identify refueling stations for demolition equipment, material haulers, and material lifts. May reduce fuel costs. Consider distributing/ presenting a map of the location and the desired route. Creates awareness. May reduce minor refueling delays and avoid confusion. Minimizes traffic impacts on and/or off the airfield. 55 Alternative Transportation Public Transportation Access and Carpooling If possible, locate the construction staging area (or shuttle bus locations) within 0.5- mile walking distance of an existing commuter rail or subway/elevated train station and/or within 0.25-mile walking distance of one or more stops for two or more bus lines. LEED® SS Credit 4.1 If possible, work with a local Transportation Management Association (TMA) to develop alternative transportation access options. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Post display boards that illustrate available shuttles and public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Transit use decreases congestion onsite and decreases traffic disruption and congestion in neighboring areas. 64 Coordinate with local and regional transit authorities to advance multiple transit connection opportunities to the construction site. LEED® SS Credit 4.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD If possible, work with a local TMA to develop alternative transportation access options. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Post display boards that illustrate available shuttles and public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Transit use decreases congestion onsite and decreases traffic disruption and congestion in neighboring areas. 39 Provide incentives such as discounted fares to encourage the use of public transportation. LEED® SS Credit 4.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Obtain airport funds raised from permit or fee parking to subsidize mass transportation passes for construction workers. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Post display boards that illustrate public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. 39 Provide a transportation plan to and from the construction site that lists available public transportation options, directions, fares, and any available discounts or airport incentives. LEED® SS Credit 4.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces land requirements; minimizes the number of construction employee spaces required (keeping spaces open for fee- based customer parking). Post display boards that illustrate public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Post display boards that illustrate public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -47 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Surface Transportation Alternative Transportation Public Transportation Access and Carpooling Provide consolidated construction employee private vehicle parking/staging areas with regular shuttles during construction. Minimizes the number of construction employee spaces required (keeping spaces open for fee- based customer parking). Post display boards that illustrate the shuttle routes and public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Post display boards that illustrate the shuttle routes and public transportation connection opportunities, routes, fares, and directions. Decreases congestion on site. 2 Coordinate carpooling to construction sites by developing schedules and incentives (such as preferential parking) based on locations. Use website schedules, meetings, and/or displays boards in common areas. LEED® SS Credit 4.4 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces land requirements; minimizes the number of construction employee spaces required (keeping spaces open for fee- based customer parking). Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Decreased onsite parking minimizes site erosion. Use website schedules, meetings, and/or displays boards in common areas. Decreases congestion on site. 2, 39 Alternative Transportation Bicycle Access/Use Provide centralized facilities for secure bicycle storage. LEED® SS Credit 4.2 Use airport funds raised from permit or fee parking to encourage bicycle use. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Include bike racks at construction staging locations and provide signs near the construction site that indicate the availability of bicycling facilities and their location. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. 2 Provide convenient changing/shower areas for bicyclists. LEED® SS Credit 4.2 Use airport funds raised from permit or fee parking to encourage bicycle use. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Provide signs near the construction site that indicate the availability of bicycling facilities and their location. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. 2 Provide incentives to encourage that a minimum of 5 percent of construction workers use bicycles for all or part of their daily commute. LEED® SS Credit 4.2 Use airport funds raised from permit or fee parking to encourage bicycle use. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Provide signs near the construction site that indicate the availability of bicycling facilities and their location. Minimizes impact to local traffic and congestion. 64 Develop and implement a "ZipBike" or other bike sharing program for construction workers to travel between facilities. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Use airport funds raised from permit or fee parking to encourage bicycle use. Commute trips via alternative transportation modes produce less air pollution than single occupant vehicle commuting. Include bike racks at construction staging locations and provide signs near the construction site that indicate the availability of bicycling facilities and their location. Decreases congestion on site. 39 (continued on next page)

A -48 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Goals and Policies Require contractors to develop a waste management plan that contains waste targets; an estimate of the waste to be generated on site; actions to reduce waste; and actions to avoid waste going to a landfill. LEED® MRCredit 2 HECA, ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD, EGGD, EGKK, LGAV Potential substantial cost savings from reduced material hauling, disposal fees, and fuel costs. Conserves natural resources. Reduces materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. The reuse of materials onsite may reduce offsite hauls, decreasing emissions, energy consumption, and traffic. May streamline the quantification and organization of materials onsite, potentially reducing impacts to airport operations. Essential for quantifying and organizing materials onsite during demolition. Facilitates resource sharing among projects. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce temporary construction-related traffic in the surrounding community. Salvageable and/or recyclable waste could be donated or sold at a reduced cost to the local community. 39, 64 Include recycling requirements and other sustainable practices in technical specifications to help convey expectations to contractors; this may include providing environmental planning checklists to contractors. HNL, DEN, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD, ORD Increased recycling efforts may reduce disposal costs. Clearly specifies contractor responsibilities. May enhance recycling activities and thus reduce the emissions from hauling, the traffic impacts, and the consumption of fossil fuels. May require additional staff training to explain procedures and requirements to contractors. Educates construction workers and identifies that sustainability is a priority at the airport. 2, 9 Include in all contract documents the minimum quantities of excess materials that will be accepted for return by the vendor and the required condition of such material. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Helps avoid unexpected costs associated with over-ordering materials and may reduce costs of hauling to landfills. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. The contractor should avoid under-ordering materials, which could result in operational delays. Reduced material hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 39 If using a waste contractor, verify that the contractor's waste licenses are relevant and up to date. Work with contracts administration; ensures that contractors are familiar with current standards and practices. Ensures that contractors are aware of and up-to-date on current regulatory practices and requirements. Ensures that contractors are familiar with current standards and practices. Stresses that construction waste management is a priority at the airport; helps ensure contractors are honest and experienced. 66 Provide contractors with a list of local companies that reuse and recycle materials. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. May reduce materials/components that are sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Update through periodic construction open houses. May help provide opportunities for the involvement of MBEs, small, and/or local businesses. 46 Allocate personal responsibility for onsite waste reduction (i.e., appoint a Waste Manager). Consistent and knowledgeable application of standards and specifications across all projects. Consistent knowledge and understanding of environmental standards and specifications across all projects. Applies consistent knowledge and understanding of applicable standards and practices, tracking and reporting across all projects. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 66

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -49 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Goals and Policies Develop a balanced earthwork plan and keep as much excavated earth onsite as possible to reduce offsite hauling. Develop an inventory of topsoil for potential reuse. ORD May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. Conserves natural resources. Reduces roadway congestion, energy use, and emissions. May avoid having to haul new material to the site. Consider the reuse of earthwork/soil for another project. Avoid 'double- hauling' of materials. Inventory of soils may streamline the reuse of soil airportwide. Site management to avoid erosion and dust is essential. Excess airport earthwork could be donated or sold at a reduced cost to the community. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce temporary construction- related traffic in the surrounding community. 18 Develop a detailed lay-down/sequencing plan. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Better material management. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. Reduces the demand for raw materials. Facilitates project staging of materials, and material sharing. Could reduce temporary construction- related surface transportation impacts as vehicles would make fewer trips offsite. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 39 Designate a hazardous waste containment area and arrange for a hazardous waste inspector to periodically assess the site. Also designate special construction waste containment areas (medical, industrial, pollution). LEED® MRCredit 2 STL May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. Reduces construction worker and community exposure to waste. May involve several regulatory requirements. May minimize construction worker and community exposure to waste. 2 Establish a hazardous waste management plan for all storage and operational use of hazardous materials, including battery collection. MKE May help avoid expensive costs associated with hazardous waste accidents. Address regulatory requirements. Minimizes contamination of soil, water, and other resources. May require specialized containment and operational conditions; requires staff training. May minimize construction worker exposure to hazardous waste. 24 Designate a permanent, easily accessible, central storage area or secondary containment area onsite for reuse and proper storage of construction materials. LEED® MRCredit 2 ORD May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs for the airport operator/ contractor and minimize or avoid the cost of bringing new materials onsite. The emissions associated with haul routes and storage sites should be considered when locating the site. May reduce emissions and traffic impacts from offsite disposal trips. The storage area should be strategically located so it does not require idling and/or delay of airport/construction operations. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 18, 54 To ensure compliance with waste management and recycling goals, submit updated site waste recycling forms on a monthly basis, including the amounts of construction or demolition materials recycled or salvaged. LEED® MRCredit 2 PDX Increased recycling efforts may reduce disposal costs; however, the cost of monitoring the recycling efforts may outweigh the benefits if not part of everyday practice. Conserves natural resources. May enhance recycling activities and thus reduce emissions from hauling, traffic impacts, and the consumption of fossil fuels. May require additional staff training to explain procedures and requirements to contractors. Essential to become part of everyday practice. Educates construction workers and identifies that sustainability is a priority at the airport. 53 (continued on next page)

A -50 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Goals and Policies Submit a final site waste recycling form prior to contract closeout that sets forth the total amount of construction or demolition materials recycled over the duration of the project. LEED® MRCredit 2 PDX Increased recycling efforts may reduce disposal costs; however, the costs of monitoring the recycling efforts may outweigh the benefits. Ensures compliance with waste management and recycling goals. May enhance recycling activities and thus reduce emissions from hauling, traffic impacts, and the consumption of fossil fuels. Partners contractor and construction management teams. May require additional staff training to explain procedures and requirements to contractors. Educates construction workers and identifies that sustainability is a priority at the airport. 53 Do not remove protective packaging from materials before they are needed to prevent spoilage and to allow for the return of unused materials. Usually unused materials can be sold back to the supplier at a 50 percent restocking fee. May reduce materials/components that are sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. Consider onsite staging and storage requirements. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 67 Provide financial incentives to contractors who substantially exceed requirements of the Construction Waste Management Plan. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. Conserves natural resources. Contractual requirements to be specified; perhaps difficult to monitor. Stresses that construction waste management is a priority at the airport. 66 Construction Waste Management Storage and Collection of Recyclables Recycle aluminum, glass, plastics, paper, and corrugated cardboard. Requires initial startup costs and the use of dedicated storage/ containment areas; potential for cost savings or offsets. Keeps materials out of the waste stream and conserves natural resources by reusing materials. Expand the type of recyclables as applicable. Consider partnering with local communities. 2 Recycle gas and oil filters, waste gasoline, motor oil, antifreeze, scrap metal, tires, electrical wiring, deicing fluid, grease, sludge, hazardous materials, and spent solvents. Reduces disposal and waste handling costs. Keeps hazardous materials out of the waste stream. Requires storage and containment areas, and staff training. Consider partnering with local communities. 2 Recycle batteries, light bulbs, toner cartridges, and electronics (including monitors). Reduces disposal and waste handling costs. Keeps hazardous materials out of the waste stream. Requires storage and containment areas, and staff training. Consider partnering with local communities. 2 Determine the disposal costs, hauling costs, and revenue generated for reusing materials; compare them with the cost of purchasing/constructing new items. LEED® MRCredit 3 ORD Helps identify cost-saving opportunities. A credit under USGBC LEED® criteria. May require a tracking system and coordination amongst contractors. Quantify and include as part of a public outreach plan. 19 Coordinate recyclable collection infrastructure with hauler capability. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. May reduce materials/components that are sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. May require flexibility to provide onsite staging, storage, containment areas. Helps avoid delays during materials removal. May facilitate use of local, small businesses. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -51 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Storage and Collection of Recyclables Use cardboard balers, aluminum can crushers, recycling chutes, and other technologies to enhance recycling activities and reduce the number of waste hauls. Reducing material volumes reduces handling and hauling costs. Reduced volumes reduce truck hauling trips, thereby reducing energy use and emissions. Reduced material volume reduces onsite storage and containment requirements. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 2 Ensure that the construction manager understands the demolition requirements and properly sets up the demolition process to identify and organize materials according to how they can be reused and/or recycled. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill. The reuse of materials onsite may eliminate offsite transportation and thus decrease construction vehicle emissions and energy consumption. Could reduce temporary impacts to surface transportation if vehicles make fewer trips offsite. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 52 Ensure that recycling bins are full and packed before using new bins. Reduces handling and hauling costs. Reduces energy use and emissions from transport. Requires sufficiently sized and organized storage area. Ensure that such areas do not become wildlife attracting. May help minimize traffic impacts. 55 Charge a fee to contractors who contaminate recycling bins. Creates financial incentive for contractors to recycle material properly and provides a mechanism to recover costs if material has to be sorted before a recycler will accept it. Encourages contractors to recycle material properly. Encourages contractors to recycle material properly. Stresses that construction waste management is a priority at the airport. 55 Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse To facilitate the reuse of materials, track and evaluate the following waste for recycling (at a minimum): land-clearing debris, cardboard, metal, brick, concrete, asphalt, plastic, clean wood, glass, gypsum wallboard, carpet, and insulation. LEED® MRCredit 2 ORD Helps offset construction- demolition costs. May minimize or avoid the cost of bringing new materials onsite. Conserves natural resources. Make a part of everyday practice. Streamlines the reuse of materials, and encourage the use of materials/ products with recycled content. Facilitates material reuse and sharing programs both onsite and within the community. 2 Reuse project waste as a resource on another project. Reuse may include concrete, asphalt, land and clearing debris, small ancillary buildings or structures, and building components. List materials available for use on a communal website, display boards/posters, and/or hold a meeting with all contractors to discuss available materials. ORD May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. List materials available for use on a communal website, display boards/posters, and/or hold a meeting with all contractors to discuss available materials. If the waste cannot be reused on site, consider sharing opportunities with the local community and/or nearby projects, minimizing haul distances and emissions. 2 (continued on next page)

A -52 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse Use an on-site batch plant (or onsite rock crusher) to crush concrete and reuse it onsite. PBI, LNA, F45, DAL, RBD, MSP, BWI May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs for the airport operator/ contractor and minimize or avoid the cost of bringing new materials onsite. May help extend the life of existing landfills and reduce the need for new landfills through the reduction of total waste generated. Reduces the demand for raw materials. Requires storage and containment areas, and staff training. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 60 Use a "rubbleizer" machine that performs multiple tasks in a single step - sending vibrations into concrete to break into usable pieces less than 4 inches. May reduce labor and fuel costs for the airport operator/contractor and save costs associated with purchasing new concrete and masonry. May reduce emissions and allow for enhanced onsite recycling of concrete, reducing the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. May reduce offsite transportation and thus decrease construction vehicle emissions and energy consumption. Expedites the removal of concrete, reducing delays. May help minimize traffic impacts. 65 If no local markets exist for recycling drywall in the area, recycle non- contaminated drywall by grinding and spreading on open land at the airport at a rate of approximately 5 tons per acre and then tilling into the soil. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs. The airport operator/ contractor should also factor in the cost to grind and apply the drywall. Ensure that the drywall is free of hazardous materials before implementing this practice. Place the ground drywall on flat land away from waterbodies to avoid runoff. No applicable Research Team Consideration. A unique practice that may educate construction workers and the local community. 54 Donate unused paint to a local graffiti removal program. SLC May decrease costs by donating the material rather than sending it to a disposal service. Finding a use for unused waste reduces the chance of improper disposal and contaminating the environment. Requires worker/staff education and instruction to achieve; consider appointing a community liaison. Resource sharing with the community; improves community relations. 58 Minimize the use of temporary wood structures. May decrease costs if reusable formwork is used on multiple projects. Using reusable formwork can reduce the amount of materials sent to the landfill and conserve natural resources. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May help minimize traffic impacts. 55 Use ultra screen sight and sound barriers (lightweight panels with no special equipment for installation, maintenance, or replacement) instead of traditional sight and sound barriers. May decrease installation and maintenance costs. May reduce sight and sound impacts compared to traditional barriers. Typically requires less time and labor for installation and maintenance than for traditional sight and sound barriers. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use chain clamps as alternatives to traditional methods of pipe fit-up as each clamp can fit up elbows, tees, flanges, and other pipe fittings. Although chain clamps can be expensive compared to traditional pipe fit-up methods, they may reduce labor and disassembly costs. Chain clamps may reduce the quantity of pipe fit-up materials used, including plastics. May allow for easier disassembly, reducing impacts to airport operations during future projects. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -53 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse Reuse existing runway pavement (e.g., for taxiways). LEED® MR Credit 3 ORD Determined through facility planning. May reduce costs associated with hauling, disposal, fueling, and purchasing new pavement. May reduce the amount of pavement sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing new pavement. As part of EONS, determine cost savings of not demolishing and reconstructing. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 2 Use excess asphalt paving to fix surrounding roads, drives, parking lots, etc. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs and save costs associated with purchasing new asphalt. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. Uses construction crews already in place; may require contract modification or flexibility. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 55 Use concrete chunks, old bricks, broken block and other masonry rubble for backfill along foundation walls where permitted. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs and save costs associated with purchasing new concrete and masonry. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. May reduce temporary impacts to surface transportation as vehicles would make fewer trips offsite. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 55 Recycle crushed, unreinforced concrete by using it in swales, fill, rip-rap and drainage. LEED® MRCredit 4 Minimizes the costs of buying new materials and transporting them to the construction site. Reduces landfill hauls. Reduces the environmental impacts of producing new construction products and materials. As part of EONS, determine cost savings of not demolishing and reconstructing. May improve the community's view of the airport if included in an outreach program. Reduces offsite hauls, thereby reducing surface transportation congestion. 65 Use excess concrete for parking stops, jersey barriers, etc. May reduce hauling, disposal, and fuel costs and save costs associated with purchasing new concrete. May reduce materials/ components sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. May reduce offsite transportation and thus decrease construction vehicle emissions and energy consumption. May reduce temporary impacts to surface transportation as vehicles would make fewer trips offsite. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 55 Use pre-assembled rebar cages when possible to reduce onsite rebar waste. May achieve cost savings. Reduces need for excess material recycling and reuse. May require less staff training. Reduced offsite hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 55 Separate subsoil and topsoil and ensure proper storage for reuse. Facilitates use; minimizes 'double' and 'triple' touching. Vegetating long-term stockpile with suitable plants may help prevent dust blow and erosion, silt runoff, and the establishment of invasive or noxious weeds. To avoid soil compaction, heavy machinery must not be driven on stockpiles. Stockpiles should not be located with 10 meters of a watercourse. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 20 Reuse items, such as electrical boxes, breaker equipment, wall outlets, and other electrical equipment where possible and practical. LEED® MRCredit 3 Potential cost savings from reuse on other projects or sale. Reduces waste materials. Make contractor aware of need to recycle these types of materials; consider code/ regulatory requirements. Include in resource database; becomes potential low-cost resource option to community. 55 (continued on next page)

A -54 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Materials Reuse Reuse empty wire spools for other purposes and tasks (e.g., stools for the break area). LEED® MRCredit 3 Disposal cost savings. Reduces waste materials. Make the contractor aware of the need to recycle these types of materials; consider code/regulatory requirements. Creates contractor awareness. 55 Save worn out nickel-cadmium (NiCad) batteries from portable power tools for delivery to a specialized battery-recycling site. Disposal cost savings. Keeps materials out of the waste stream. Requires temporary storage and transfer. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use prefabricated foam insulated concrete panels. Longer-term energy cost savings potential and benefits during construction using prefabricated, lighter materials. Reduced energy use and emissions during construction; longer-term energy and cost savings potential. Prefabricated materials facilitate installation and use. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 40 Use insulating concrete forms (ICFs) for decreased waste; ICFs also optimize energy performance and reduce impacts from construction. The use of ICFs decreases pour time and reduces the overall amount of concrete required. ICFs also provide enhanced durability. Conserves resources. Reduces exterior noise. Reduces installation/ construction time. May help minimize noise and traffic impacts. 2 Construction Waste Management Salvaged Materials and Resources Identify salvage opportunities prior to demolition activities to encourage the reuse of salvaged materials (fencing, kiosks, parking curbs, signage, lighting, benches, floor tile, doors, windows, carpeting, HVAC, etc.). LEED® MRCredit 3 Potential cost savings from reuse on other projects or sale. Conserves natural resources. Identify at outset, organize and monitor during construction, and establish staging and storage areas. Explore salvage markets local to the site for use in acquiring salvaged materials. Becomes potential asset to local community; consider sale or donation. 2 Coordinate with other airport projects to share salvaged materials and resources. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Potential cost savings from reuse on other projects or sale. Conserves natural resources. Identify at outset, organize and monitor during construction, and establish staging and storage areas. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 39 Donate salvaged materials (such as fencing and floor tile) to local organizations. Use a public information website or other means to list salvaged materials for sale or donation. May require minimal additional administrative and handling costs. Conserves natural resources. Requires establishing temporary and longer-term staging and storage areas. Potential asset to local community; include as part of outreach program. 2 Remove elements that pose a contamination risk prior to reusing structures. ORD Plan for expenses; addresses regulatory requirements. Minimizes contamination of soil, water, and other resources. May require specialized containment, operational conditions, and contractor expertise. Minimize construction worker exposure to hazardous wastes. 19

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -55 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Reuse and Recycling Materials Construction Waste Management Salvaged Materials and Resources Use a "Construction Waste Management Database" provided by the Whole Building Design Guide at www.wbdg.org/tools/cwm.php to identify salvaged materials and resources, and companies that haul, collect, and process recyclable debris from construction projects. LEED® MRCredit 2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD The Database is an online service for those seeking companies that recycle construction debris in their area. A search can be conducted by state, zip code, or material(s) to be recycled. May reduce materials/components that are sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. Consider using the Whole Building Design Guide, which can be accessed at www.wbdg.org/tools/cwm.p hp, or a similar tool. Organizes resource reuse and waste disposal; becomes a tool for use by others. 39 Reuse forms to the greatest extent possible without damaging the structural integrity of concrete and without damaging the aesthetics of exposed concrete. LEED® MRCredit 3 Cost savings from reuse on other projects. May reduce materials/components that are sent to the landfill and the environmental impacts of producing and hauling new construction products and materials. Typically part of standard operating procedures. May help minimize traffic impacts. 43 Office Waste Reduction Require electronic submittals to minimize or eliminate printed copies of reports and other submittals. Negotiate electronic/paperless submittals and change orders in construction contracts (require electronic submittals). LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces costs from storage and handling multiple copies of documents; facilitates access and distribution; facilitates record keeping. Substantially reduces paper used in multiple submittals. Can still maintain printed copies in a central location to facilitate use/ review. Facilitates access/transparency and distribution. 39 Establish a "green meetings" policy that minimizes the use of printed materials. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Minimal or negligible cost to implement. Reduces use of paper and other materials. Establishes consistent protocols. Include as part of community outreach program. 39 Use conference calls and web-based conferences and programs instead of in- person meetings when possible to reduce printed materials and to reduce emissions from transportation. ORD Reduces costs for materials and travel. Conserves natural resources and reduces energy use and emissions from travel. Examples include: NetMeeting, LiveMeeting, GoToMeeting, Webinars, and others. Reduces emissions from air travel. 19 Establish a document management system so that project files can be submitted and archived electronically by employees, consultants, and contractors. Initial startup costs; saves costs by reducing the demand for paper. Reduces the use of paper. Establishes consistent document control protocols, improves record keeping, access, and distribution. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 2 (continued on next page)

A -56 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Recycled Content Establish project goals for recycled content materials and identify material suppliers that can achieve this goal. Consider the following major building components: aggregate in cast-in-place concrete; fly ash in cast-in-place concrete; bituminous concrete pavement; unit pavers; steel reinforcement; structural steel; miscellaneous steel; steel fencing and furnishings; unit masonry; ductile iron pipe; aluminum products; site- generated broken concrete for gabions; railroad rails; railroad ties; railroad track base material; steel doors and frames; aluminum doors and windows; plaster; terrazzo; acoustical ceilings; drywall; finish flooring, including carpet, resilient flooring, and terrazzo; toilet and shower compartments; special furnishes; equipment; sheet metal ductwork; and site lighting. LEED® MRCredit 4 ORD, SLC, U42, TVY Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 2 Identify the value of both the post- consumer recycled content and the post- industrial content so that they can be compared with the total value of the materials in the project. Divide the weight of recycled content in the item by the total weight of all material in the item, and then multiply the resulting percentage by the total value of the item to determine the value of the recycled content portion of a material or furnishing. Mechanical and electrical components shall not be included in this calculation. Recycled content materials shall be defined in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission document, Guides for the Use of Environmental Marketing Claims, 16 CFR 260.7 (e), available at www.ftc.gov/bcp/gr0ule/guides980427.ht m. LEED® MRCredit 4 ORD Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 19

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -57 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Recycled Content To identify recycled content materials available and common percentages, include contact information in project specifications for reference and search tools such as the Guide to Resource- Efficient Building Elements from the Center for Resourceful Building Technology (www.crbt.org./index.html), the Recycled Content Product Directory from the applicable state integrated waste management board, and Oikos (www.oikos.com). LEED® MRCredit 4 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 39 Use recycled crushed material from other local projects. For example, asphalt grindings and rail ballasts can be taken from nearby projects and used for haul roads or bituminous runway shoulders. LEED® MRCredit 4 ORD Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. Supports local projects and improves community relations. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 19 Ensure that the specified recycled content materials are installed and quantify the total percentage of recycled content materials installed. LEED® MRCredit 4 ORD Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 19 Provide fact sheets to designers that include available recycled content materials and the organization's target for each material. LEED® MRCredit 4 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 39 Use the Waste Resource Action Programme's (WRAP) “Recycled Content Tool” to calculate the recycled content of a project and identify quick wins and benefits to maximize the recycled content of materials used with construction. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 20 Use recycled content material made from high-density polyethylene (HDPE) or comingled plastic for items such as trash receptacles, benches, tables, and bike racks. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 (continued on next page)

A -58 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Recycled Content Use recycled plastics for roadway markers, speed bumps, parking stops, and traffic signs. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use cold-rolled steel framing, as it typically contains 20-25 percent recycled material. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use hollow metal doors and frames from recycled metal content. LEED® MR Credit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Install gypsum wallboard; gypsum wallboard incorporates recycled scrap wallboard and byproduct gypsum. Synthetic gypsum content in drywall helps prevent against moisture. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use composite boards, including paper and wood/paper building boards that use milling byproducts, waste woods, recycled paper, and/or agricultural waste (wheat- straw board). LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use high-recycled-content cast iron for sanitary waste and vent piping. LEED® MR Credit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 If using plastic electrical device wall plates, ensure that they are made of at least 20 percent recycled plastic. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -59 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Recycled Content Install terrazzo materials that contain recycled content. LEED® MR Credit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 For asphalt pavements, use recycled materials, such as rubber, glass, asphalt roofing shingles, and blast furnace slag; this pavement can be used for access roads and non-FAA regulated pavements. LEED® MRCredit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 7 Use recycled rubber and plastic materials for temporary barriers and A-frame barricades. LEED® MRCredit 4 Potential cost savings. Helps conserve natural resources. Establish specifications in product purchasing. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Install flooring from recycled and reusable materials, such as rubber, glass, agriculture fibers, and plastic, which can last longer and is easy to maintain. LEED® MRCredit 4 Materials from recycled and reused materials typically last longer, and are easier to maintain, than traditional flooring materials. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use geotextile products manufactured from recycled plastic or natural-fiber geotextiles. LEED® MRCredit 4 May have a higher upfront cost. Helps conserve natural resources. Establish specifications in product purchasing. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use cellulose insulation made from 75- 85 percent recycled newsprint. LEED® MR Credit 4 Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Product availability may be limited. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Local/Regional Materials Use the following locally/regionally available materials: concrete, asphalt, structural steel, masonry, post-industrial recycled gypsum wallboard, storm system concrete pipes of all sizes, manholes and handholes, electrical duct banks, cable, gas and water piping, rail tracks, rail ties, rail ballast, landscape material, and seed. LEED® MRCredit 5 ORD Regional building materials are more cost effective for projects because of reduced transportation costs. Reduces the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. For buildings, specify mechanical, electrical and plumbing equipment and components that meet the regional material goals. The availability of regionally manufactured materials is dependent on the project location. Supports the local economy and the use of indigenous resources. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 2, 18, 64 (continued on next page)

A -60 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Local/Regional Materials Establish a goal for the minimum percentage of local/regional materials and products that are manufactured within a radius of 500 miles. Identify the value of local/regional materials so that they can be compared with the total value of the materials in the task/project. (Manufacturing refers to the final assembly of components into the building product that is furnished and installed by the tradesmen.) LEED® MRCredit 5 ORD Regional building materials are more cost effective for projects due to reduced transportation costs. Consider early in the design process, if possible, since research may be required to determine what products can be sourced locally and be realistically expected to be purchased for the project. Reduces the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. It is also important to discuss the source of raw materials used to manufacture building products. Identify and specify materials and material suppliers that can achieve the regional materials goal. Supports the local economy and the use of indigenous resources. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 19, 64 During construction, ensure that the specified local materials are installed and quantify the percentage of the local materials installed based on a percentage of overall construction cost. LEED® MRCredit 5 ORD Regional building materials are more cost effective for projects because of reduced transportation costs. Reduces the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. May require hiring a LEED® AP or other professional to monitor compliance. May require a tracking system and personnel to monitor compliance. Supports the local economy and the use of indigenous resources. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 19, 64 Engage the FAA in discussing the use of regional or local suppliers as part of projects that use FAA funding and adhere to FAA rules. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Regional building materials are more cost effective for projects because of reduced transportation costs. Consider early in the design process, if possible, since research may be required to determine what products can be sourced locally and be realistically expected to be purchased for the project. Reduces the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Supports the local economy and the use of indigenous resources. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 39 Allow contractors to suggest availability of local materials - keep lines of communication open. LEED® MRCredit 5 Regional building materials are more cost effective for projects because of reduced transportation costs. Consider early in the design process, if possible, since research may be required to determine what products can be sourced locally and be realistically expected to be purchased for the project. Reduces the environmental impacts resulting from transportation. Consider establishing and promoting a website where contractors can indicate the availability of regional materials. Supports the local economy and the use of indigenous resources. Retains capital for the community, contributing to a more stable tax base and a healthier local economy. 56

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -61 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Use the following rapidly renewable materials for both permanent and temporary construction materials: poplar OSB and straw board or "agriboard" (formwork for temporary construction and underlayment); bamboo flooring; cork; wool carpets and fabrics; cotton-batting insulation; linoleum flooring; sunflower seed board; wheat grass or straw board cabinetry; and others. LEED® MRCredit 6 As rapidly renewable materials may be harvested more quickly, they tend to result in a faster payback on investment for manufacturers. As demand increases, they are expected to become cost-competitive with conventional materials. Rapidly renewable materials are made from plants and typically harvested within a 10-year cycle. Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 2, 64 Establish an appropriate project goal for use of renewable materials. LEED® MR Credit 6 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD As rapidly renewable materials may be harvested more quickly, they tend to result in a faster payback on investment for manufacturers. As demand increases, they are expected to become cost-competitive with conventional materials. Rapidly renewable materials are made from plants and typically harvested within a 10-year cycle. Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials. Percent of rapidly renewable materials equals the total cost of rapidly renewable materials divided by the total materials cost. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 39, 64 Ensure that the specified rapidly renewable materials are installed. LEED® MR Credit 6 ORD As rapidly renewable materials may be harvested more quickly, they tend to result in a faster payback on investment for manufacturers. As demand increases, they are expected to become cost-competitive with conventional materials. Rapidly renewable materials are made from plants and typically harvested within a 10-year cycle. Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials. May require a tracking system and personnel to monitor compliance. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 19, 64 Install clay roof tiles, which are made from abundant raw materials and carry effective heat gain characteristics (for cool climates). LEED® MRCredit 6 Reduces maintenance costs; clay roof tiles provide improved durability and an increased life cycle. Requires less energy to produce and has a long life cycle. Production of clay has a low environmental impact; clay can be easily recycled. Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials. Building-integrated solar clay tiles are also available. Clay roof tiles are fireproof. May enhance architectural features. 55 Use paper joint tape to reinforce joints and corners in gypsum drywall interiors in lieu of fiberglass tape. LEED® MRCredit 6 May result in less cracking and thus fewer call backs, saving time and money. A potential health hazard results from the dust produced during the removal of fiberglass casts. Provides strength to joints between plasterboard sheets. Easier to remove than fiberglass tape. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 55 (continued on next page)

A -62 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Rapidly Renewable Materials Use paper-faced compressed straw panels as an alternative for interior wall partitions. LEED® MRCredit 6 Straw is relatively inexpensive since it is a waste product of grains. Avoids unpredictable lumber prices. Straw mats are a rapidly renewable waste product of grains, such as harvested wheat, rice, barley, oats, and rye. Since straw is still burned in fields in some areas, air pollution associated with burning straw is avoided. While straw provides few nutrients to the soil, it does add organic matter and helps aerate the soil. Straw densely packed into bales is fire resistant since the tight packing keeps the available oxygen needed for combustion limited and the high silica content in straw is said to impede fire. May reduce the risk of accidents that can occur when shifting winds blow smoke over highways and ignite straw left in fields. 26, 55 Install carpets made with bio-based materials, such as cotton, jute, sisal, hemp, wool, and polylactic acid (PLA) fiber. LEED® MRCredit 6 Carpet made of wool is usually more expensive (although inherently flame resistant). Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials. Improves indoor air quality. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 43 Use natural cork, strawboard, and recycled-content fiber board in flooring underlayment applications. LEED® MRCredit 6 As demand increases, they are expected to become cost-competitive with conventional materials. Synthetic carpet fiber, backing, pad, adhesive, seam sealants, and floor preparation chemicals are all potential sources of VOCs in indoor air. These natural materials do not emit harmful chemicals. Cork floor tile should be composed of 100 percent natural cork bark and recycled cork granules and set in a natural or synthetic flexible resin matrix; it should be homogeneous and uniform in composition throughout the tile thickness. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 55 Use a carbon-negative, hemp-based building material from renewable sources that is several times stronger than concrete. The material can be used as a substitute for concrete for the creation of buildings, insulating walls, and insulation layers for floors and roofs. LEED® MRCredit 6 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Produced mainly from renewable sources, hemp-based building materials are mixed on site and deliver high levels of insulation, air- tightness, and vapor permeability. The product can have a lifespan of approximately 100 years. More carbon is absorbed through growing the hemp than creating the building material, which helps reverse the damaging effects of greenhouse gases. Hemp- based building materials can lock up approximately 110 kilograms of carbon dioxide per cubic meter of wall. Weighs less than concrete and is less prone to cracking. May be used to create insulating walls and insulation layers for floors and roofs. Can be used to provide buildings with beneficial thermal and acoustic properties. Creates a healthy living and work environment. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -63 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures Use Portland cement concrete with 25 percent fly ash (can be substituted for up to 60 percent of cement in a concrete mix) that has less embodied energy and reduces water permeability. LEED® MRCredit 4 May reduce material costs. Fly ash is a byproduct of coal-fired power plants; it contains some radioactivity otherwise disposed in landfills. Coal fly ash blended cements may range from 0 percent - 40 percent coal fly ash by weight, according to ASTM C 595, for cement Types IP and I(PM). 15 percent is a more accepted rate when coal fly ash is used as a partial cement replacement. May enhance concrete capabilities. Availability is variable. Establish specifications for use/ composition. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 43, 55 Use ground granulated blast furnace (GGBF) slag to replace up to 70 percent of the Portland cement in concrete mixtures. Most GGBF slag concrete mixtures contain between 25 and 50 percent GGBF slag by weight, providing protection against sulphate attack and chloride attack. LEED® MRCredit 4 GGBF slag cement is typically less expensive than Portland cement. GGBF slag has replaced sulfate-resisting Portland cement on the market for sulfate resistance because of its superior performance and greatly reduced cost. Useful application of a waste product. Must be in compliance with ASTM C989, Grade 100 or Grade 120. Availability is variable. Establish specifications for use/composition. Improves durability, reducing maintenance costs and the need for repairs that may delay operations. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. 43, 55 Use silica fume as a replacement for 5 to 7 percent of Portland cement to improve compressive strength, bond strength, and abrasion resistance; reduce permeability; and protect from corrosion. LEED® MRCredit 4 May reduce material costs. Extends the life cycle of cement, reducing the frequency of repairs and replacement. Silica fume is very fine pozzolanic material produced by electric arc furnaces as a byproduct of the production of elemental silicon or ferro- silicon alloys. Reduces the need for maintenance, thereby reducing operational delays. Replacement levels higher than 10 percent can lead to workability issues. Availability is variable. Establish specifications for use/composition. Prevents silica fume from being discharged into the atmosphere. 43 Crush and reuse hardened, cured waste concrete as fill or as a base course for pavement. Hardened, cured waste concrete may be used as aggregate in concrete mix (if approved by the engineer). LEED® MRCredit 4 May reduce material costs. May reduce disposal costs for waste, as in many urban areas, concrete can no longer be accepted in landfills. In many urban areas, concrete can no longer be accepted in landfills. Concrete admixtures are now available that retard the setting of concrete so effectively that a partial load can be brought back to the ready mix plant for 1 or 2 days then reactivated for use. Establish specifications for use/composition. Reduced off-site hauling could reduce traffic in the surrounding community. 43 (continued on next page)

A -64 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures Use scrap tires as an alternative fuel source (tire-derived fuel, or TDF) in cement production kilns or purchase concrete from kilns that use recycled tires. Tires contain 1.25 times the energy content of coal, so the savings on energy costs can be significant. The cement industry is the largest end-user of TDF. Tires have consistent and predictable properties, so TDF performance in the kiln is well understood. Tires contain less nitrogen than coal; the higher the nitrogen level at which tires are substituted for coal, the greater the reduction of nitrogen oxides. Emissions demonstrate a consistent reduction in sulfur and other emissions with the use of TDF. The use of TDF is typically limited because tires also contain zinc, which slows the setting time for concrete. Availability is variable. The use of tires as a source of energy may not be well received because of concern over potential emissions; the loss of a resource used as fuel diverts tires from higher value-added markets. In reality, the addition of TDF typically has a neutral to positive effect on air emissions. 5, 11 Use the asphalt, aggregate, fibers, and limestone filler from recycled roof shingles in hot-mix or warm-mix asphalt. Asphalt mixes with recycled roof shingles may be more resistant to thermal cracking (undergoing further testing), reducing maintenance costs. Reduces the demand on virgin materials. Reduces landfill-bound waste. Must abide by NESHAP 40 CFR Part 61, Subpart M (must be asbestos free, cannot include nails or deletious material; must follow grind size and moisture content specifications). Samples should be proportioned and pre-blended prior to heating. May help improve the community's view of the airport if part of an outreach program. Reduces landfill- bound waste in the local community, especially after large storm events. 68 Use carbon fiber reinforcement instead of rebar or steel mesh (these products corrode and are one of the weakest parts of the concrete structure). Reduce cracking and extend life in concrete, reducing maintenance costs. The product is lightweight and corrosion resistant, making it stronger and easier to use than steel, producing lighter weight components, product developers contend. Establish specifications for use. Extends the structure's life cycle, reducing the frequency of building repairs. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 40 Use rubberized pavements or innovative pavement treatments to improve durability and reduce maintenance. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces maintenance costs and replacement costs by extending the pavement's life cycle. May reduce the need for expensive noise barriers. Can reduce road noise by as much as 15 dB. Makes use of recycled tires. Extends pavement life cycle, reducing the frequency of rehabilitation and maintenance. Reduces noise in nearby communities. 7, 39 Use rubber modified asphalt (RMA) with crumb rubber content no greater than 20 percent. RMA, specifically when used in stress absorbing membranes or stress absorbing membrane interlayers, reduces the occurrence of reflective cracking because of its elastic properties, thereby reducing maintenance costs. Decreases noise levels (up to 5 dB). Depending on the application selected, between 500 and 2,000 scrap tires can be used in each lane mile of pavement. Improves skid resistance. Reduces noise in nearby communities. 8, 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -65 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures Use warm-mix asphalt to reduce energy needs during construction. BOS, ORD Uses 20 percent less energy to make, reducing production costs. The asphalt is heated 75- 50°F less than traditional ‘hot-mix’ asphalt, reducing GHG emissions onsite and at the production plant. Produces 20 percent fewer greenhouse gas emissions than traditional asphalt. Some sources claim warm- mix asphalt compacts better, allowing for sturdier runways. Requires FAA coordination/approval. Because warm-mix asphalt is not heated as high, the work environment is healthier for the crews installing the pavement. 19, 32 Install light colored/high albedo pavement for roadways (i.e., Portland cement), parking lots, sidewalks, and plaza areas. LEED® SS Credit 7.1 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Absorbs less heat, which may aid in energy savings. Reduces costs associated with HVAC equipment. Reduces heat islands, minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. Improves roadway visibility, thereby improving safety. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive pavements. 39 Use asphalt pavements for access roads and non-FAA-regulated pavements. Asphalt typically requires about 20 percent less energy to produce and construct than other pavements, consuming less fuel. The production and installation of asphalt produces lower levels of greenhouse gases than other pavements. Dark-colored pavement may increase the heat island effect. Consider shading and/or open-grid systems where possible. Asphalt pavement is generally faster to construct and rehabilitate, opening to traffic as soon as it has been compacted and cooled. Consider the amount of absorptive pavements in the local community to ensure that heat islands would not be an issue of concern. 7 Provide shade for new pavement from the existing tree canopy or within 5 years of landscape installation. Landscaping (trees) should be in place at the time of occupancy. LEED® SS Credit 7.1 Reduces costs associated with HVAC equipment and may extend the life cycle of the covered pavement. Reduces stormwater runoff and heat islands, minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. May reduce glare, enhancing safety in parking lots and roadways. Vegetated areas provide aesthetic benefits. 64 Place a minimum of 50 percent of newly constructed parking spaces under cover. Any roof used to shade or cover parking must have an SRI value of 29 or be a vegetated green roof. LEED® SS Credit 7.1 Green roofs require lower maintenance than standard roofs (if native species are planted), but typically require additional upfront investment. Reduces heat islands, minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. Green roofs reduce stormwater runoff. May reduce glare, enhancing safety in parking lots and roadways. Vegetated roofs provide aesthetic benefits. 64 (continued on next page)

A -66 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures Install permeable pavement (pavers or pervious concrete) for roadways, shoulders, non-traffic pavements, maintenance roads, utility yards, and airside and landside parking facilities, where possible. LEED® SS Credit 6.1 ORD, LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD The cost of permeable pavement may be similar to (or potentially higher than) the cost of traditional pavement materials. However, the use of permeable paving can reduce the cost of providing larger or more stormwater BMPs onsite. Porous pavement can be used to turn runoff into infiltration, restore the hydrology of a site, improve water quality, replenish aquifers, protect streams, reduce heat islands, and clean stormwater. It should be avoided where activities generate contaminated runoff, and in areas that have low soil permeability, seasonal high groundwater tables, and those close to drinking water supply wells. May melt together in extreme heat, filling the “permeable” voids. Sand applied to the pavement will clog the surface. Chlorides from road salt may migrate into groundwater. Plowing may be challenging because the edge of the snow plow blade can catch the edge of the blocks, damaging the surface. Infiltrating runoff below pavement may cause frost heave, although design modifications can reduce this risk. Snow melts faster on a porous surface because of rapid drainage below the snow surface. Improves water quality and reduces flooding in the local community. 7, 18, 50, 61 Use granite aggregate as a sub-base for runways. MSP Granite aggregates have an expected lifetime of 40-50 years, reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of restructuring/repaving. Provides self-draining properties. An extended lifespan reduces the demand for new materials, thereby reducing emissions from production and transportation. Extended lifespan reduces the need for runway restructuring, thereby reducing operational delays. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 30 Extend the base course width of a pavement by 1-2 feet beyond the top pavement to prevent premature distress. Edges experience the greatest stress (largely from moisture changes), so extending the base course will result in the top pavement layer having an extended life cycle, thereby reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of restructuring/repaving. Reduces the demand for new materials, thereby minimizing emissions from production and transportation. Extended lifespan reduces the need for pavement restructuring, thereby reducing operational delays. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 29 To prevent premature distress of pavement, use a non-fossil fuel based/nonvolatile environmentally friendly prime coat to waterproof asphalt instead of a diesel-based prime coat. Prevents premature distress of pavement, thereby reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of restructuring/repaving. Reduces the quantity of air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Extended lifespan reduces the need for pavement restructuring, thereby reducing operational delays. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 29

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -67 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures During a pavement course, cut off the last foot of existing pavement and begin the next course from that spot to ensure good joint density. The last foot removed has a lower density than the rest of the course (it is weaker and leads to cracking and distress). Prevents premature distress of pavement, thereby reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of restructuring/repaving. Reduces the demand for new materials, thereby minimizing emissions from production and transportation. Extended lifespan reduces the need for pavement restructuring, thereby reducing operational delays. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 29 Use chip seals instead of slurry seals to stop pavement cracking and prevent future cracking. Once chip seals are used, then micro surfacing can be applied. Life cycle (4 to 6 years) and cost (per square yard) are the same as for a slurry seal. Equipment to apply a slurry seal is not as common as the equipment for a chip-seal application. An extended pavement life cycle reduces the demand for new materials, minimizing emissions from production and transportation. Provides increased skid resistance, an anti-glare surface during wet weather, and an increased reflective surface for night driving. The incidence of cracked windshields can be reduced by using volcanic cinders or manufactured lightweight aggregate. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 29 Use precast high performance concrete for buildings. Prefabrication may reduce product and transportation costs. Focuses environmental controls at production facility. Establish specifications for use. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 40 Use "Roman concrete" instead of traditional concrete to extend the durability of a structure. Roman concrete consists of volcanic ash or 'pozzolan' (silica and small amounts of alumina and iron oxide) instead of sand and is mixed at a ratio of two parts pozzolan to one part lime. Prevents premature distress and extends life cycle, reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of restructuring/repaving. Prior to purchasing, consider the emissions associated with hauling the Roman concrete components long distances. Extended lifespan reduces the need for rebuilding or restructuring, reducing operational delays. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 21 Use recycled newspaper or waste agriculture materials in expansion joint fillers to keep them dry and clean. Less expensive than conventional fillers. Since rapidly renewable materials may be harvested more quickly, they tend to result in a faster payback on investment for manufacturers. Reduces the use and depletion of finite raw materials and long-cycle renewable materials. No applicable Research Team Consideration. May sustain a community over a longer period than the steady and eventual depletion of finite resources or the degradation of a productive ecosystem. 55 For structural steel, consider metal finishing based on physical processes such as abrasive blasting, grinding, buffing, and polishing, rather than multiple coatings. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Avoid plated metals that use cadmium or chromium plating materials and cyanide or formaldehyde copper plating solutions. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Protects the health of installers and occupants. 55 (continued on next page)

A -68 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Pavements and Building Structures Use fiber cement siding as a replacement for wood or typical exterior wall cladding. Fiber-cement siding is composed of cement, sand, and cellulose fiber that has been autoclaved (cured with pressurized steam) to increase its strength and dimensional stability. The fiber is added as reinforcement to prevent cracking. Looks like wood while achieving higher durability and lower maintenance costs. The installed costs are typically less than for traditional masonry or synthetic stucco, equal to or less than hardboard siding, and more than vinyl siding. Termite-resistant, water- resistant, non-combustible, and warranted to last 50 years. Appropriate for hot and humid climates because fiber-cement siding is resistant to rot, fungus, and termite infestation. Manufacturers state that it has excellent weathering characteristics, strength, and impact resistance. Unless top coat is applied in the factory, siding may need to be painted every 4- 5 years. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 5, 42 Use large panel formwork systems to reduce concrete waste generated by losses caused by damaged formwork, which usually accounts for 30 percent of the total concrete waste. May increase material costs; however, may reduce transportation of materials, thereby reducing transportation and waste disposal costs. Uses fewer raw materials; reduces material waste, transportation impacts, and landfill impacts; and improves air quality by reducing negative impacts related to concrete processing. Enables just-in-time construction techniques. Reduces the impact of delivery vehicles on local streets. 55 Use biodegradable form releasing agents. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Conventional form-release oils can be a major source of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), soil contamination, and human health risks. Biodegradable nonpetroleum alternatives contain a fraction of the federally permitted VOC limit for concrete form- release agents. May minimize exposure of workers to hazardous pollutants. Protects the health of installers and occupants. 55 Roofing Materials Install high reflectance/high albedo roofing materials with a high solar reflectance index (SRI), as described in the ASTM E 1980 standard. Low-sloped roofs (slope <= 2:12) should have an SRI value of 78 or above; steep-sloped roofs (slope > 2:12) should have an SRI value greater than 29. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 Reduces costs associated with cooling and HVAC equipment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 64

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -69 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Roofing Materials Install a vegetated green roof system for at least 50 percent of the roof area to reduce the heat island effect. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 ORD Provide energy saving insulation benefits and require lower maintenance than standard roofs (if native species are planted). Green roofs typically require an additional up- front investment. Reduces stormwater runoff - typically only 25 percent of rainfall on a green roof becomes runoff. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing the impact on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. "Extensive" green roof systems with 1 to 5 inches of topsoil can be installed that improve filtration and treatment of rainwater. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Provide aesthetic benefits and reduce heat islands. 19 Use a combination of vegetated and high albedo surfaces. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Provides energy saving insulation benefits and requires lower maintenance than standard roofs (if native species are planted). Green roofs typically require an additional up- front investment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces stormwater runoff and heat islands, minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Provides aesthetic benefits and reduce heat islands. 39 Install a Cool Roof Rating Council (CRRC) rated roof product or an Energy Star cool roof with equivalent reluctance and emittance properties (www.coolroofs.org). LEED® SS Credit 7.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces costs associated with cooling and HVAC equipment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 39 (continued on next page)

A -70 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Roofing Materials Use a single ply roofing membrane with high emittance properties. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces costs associated with cooling and HVAC equipment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 39 Apply high reflectance coating to the surface of a conventional roof membrane. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces costs associated with cooling and HVAC equipment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 39 Use metal roofs with industrial grade coating that are high reflectance and high emittance. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Reduces costs associated with cooling and HVAC equipment. Buildings in very cold climates may not experience year-round energy benefits from reflective roofing because of high emittance and low absorption, which may increase heating costs. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing impacts on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 39 For roofing shingles, use recycled steel/aluminum, photovoltaic roofing technologies, plastic shingles, natural slate shingles, certified wood shingles, and/or clay roof tiles to reduce the heat- island effect. LEED® SS Credit 7.2 Potential material cost savings; longer-term operational benefits. Reduces heat islands (thermal gradient differences between developed and undeveloped areas), minimizing the impact on the microclimate and human and wildlife habitat. Consider the regional climate (e.g., exposure to storms, tornados, hail, the solar resource potential, etc.). Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive roofing. 55 Use roofing membranes containing thermoplastic olefins (TPO) in lieu of PVCs. LEED® MRCredit 6 Higher cost compared to PVC. A properly formulated membrane sheet will not pose environmental hazards and is well suited for landfill disposal, recycling, or incineration. There are no environmental concerns with the base polymers and all of the raw materials and base additives are nonhazardous. Nonhalogenated materials, such as mineral hydrate, can be applied as flame- retardants. The following alternatives to PVC can also be used for roofing membranes: ethylene propylene diene monomer, nitrile butadiene polymer, and low-slope metal roofing. PVC poses a risk in building fires since it releases deadly gases long before it ignites. PVC is manufactured near low-income communities in Texas and Louisiana. The toxic impact of pollution from the PVC factories on the nearby communities has made them a focus in the environmental justice movement. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -71 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Foundations Add polyethylene vapor retardant under the floor slab and avoid a layer of sand between the polyethylene and the concrete to reduce the occurrence of mold. Increases floor life cycle, thereby reducing maintenance costs and the frequency of replacement. Reduces indoor air quality hazards associated with mold, thereby improving employee health. May help extend the life cycle of the floor slab, reducing building maintenance. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Install a layer of gas-permeable material under the foundation, e.g., 4 inches of gravel, covered by plastic sheeting. Reduces ground source moisture and energy use, thereby saving costs. It is more cost-effective to include radon-resistant techniques while building a structure rather than installing a radon reduction system in an existing building. Creates a physical barrier to radon entry, thereby reducing the risk of lung cancer in occupants. May require hiring staff experienced in radon minimization. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 47 Seal and caulk all openings in the concrete foundation floor and install a gas-tight 3" or 4" vent pipe that runs from under the foundation through the building to the roof. Reduces ground source moisture and energy use, thereby saving costs. It is more cost-effective to include radon-resistant techniques while building a structure rather than installing a radon reduction system in an existing building. Creates a physical barrier to radon entry and a pathway for the radon to be redirected outside, thereby reducing the risk of lung cancer in occupants. May require hiring staff experienced in radon minimization. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 47 Provide capillary break (damp-proofing) between the footing and foundation wall or perimeter foundation for slab-on-grade. A non-insulated foundation can result in significant heat loss from an otherwise tightly sealed, well-insulated building. Less expensive to install than exterior insulation for existing buildings. Reduces the demand for HVAC operation, thereby reducing emissions. May help extend the life cycle of the floor slab, reducing building maintenance. Improves air quality in the local community. 55 Install drainage tile at foundation footings. Reduces ground source moisture and energy use, thereby saving costs. Less expensive to install than exterior insulation for existing buildings. Reduces the presence of mold, thereby improving indoor air quality. Reduces the demand for HVAC operation, thereby reducing emissions. May help extend the life cycle of the floor slab, reducing building maintenance. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use foundation anchor systems that do not require excavation. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Limits excavation and soil/material disposal or storage. Establish specifications for use. Avoids construction noise and air pollution associated with excavation. 55 Building Interiors Install carpet tiles from post industrial nylon that are reusable and recyclable. LEED® MR Credit 4 Potential cost savings. Reduces land fill use, conserves use of natural resources. Specifications may need to be established in project standards and procedures to use on a project. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 (continued on next page)

A -72 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Building Interiors Use ceramic tile containing post- consumer or post-industrial waste. LEED® MR Credit 4 Potential cost savings. Reduces land fill use, conserves use of natural resources. Specifications may need to be established in project standards and procedures to use on a project. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Use structural insulated panels (SIPs) consisting of oriented-strand board (OSB) for floors, walls, and/or roofs. Provides a tighter building envelope with higher insulating properties, thereby decreasing operating costs. Due to the standardized and 'all- in-one' nature of SIPs, construction time can be reduced and may require fewer trades for system integration. Helps conserve natural resources. SIPs consist of a sandwich of two layers of structural board with an insulating layer of foam in between. The board can be sheet metal or OSB and the foam either expanded polystyrene, extruded polystyrene, or polyurethane. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Do not use particleboard or medium- density fiberboard that contains urea formaldehyde. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces long-term exposure in completed structure. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Protects the health of installers and occupants. 13 Use concrete pigments to turn plain concrete slabs into finished floors, eliminating the need for conventional finish flooring. Uses less material to turn concrete into finished surfaces, thereby reducing costs. Avoids the need for additional products and coatings, eliminating the environmental impacts associated with manufacturing and maintaining those materials. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Enhances aesthetics; avoids traffic resulting from the transportation of finish flooring. 5 Install moisture-resistant greenboard and mold-resistant purpleboard drywall. ORD Higher cost than traditional drywall because of their advanced properties. Greenboard has the same gypsum core as the other varieties, but is covered in a thicker, more water-resistant paper than standard drywall. The paper is coated with wax to help control moisture absorption. Although greenboard drywall's paper covering is water-resistant, it is not waterproof. The brittle gypsum core is not suitable for wet applications or for floors or ceilings. It is installed in the same manner as standard wallpaper. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 18 Use drywall clips instead of traditional metal or wood blocking to install drywall. These clips create a single or double-stud corner, versus the three or four-stud corners that the blocking provided. May reduce the wood used for framing by eliminating the need for nonstructural studs, and can be easier to install than extra wood backing. Reduce heat loss by allowing insulation behind the studding without the risk of non-insulated cavities. With the use of drywall clips, the drywall is separated from the framing pieces, which helps minimize sound transmission through the walls. For further sound transmission control, specialized sound isolation drywall clips can be used, which are attached to the studs then nailed to the drywall. Provides sufficient support and backing that is comparable to and sometimes better than the traditional three- or four- stud corners. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 5

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -73 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Building Interiors Prior to purchasing insulation products, ensure that they were not manufactured using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) or hydrochlorofluorocarbon (HCFC) refrigerants. LEED® EACredit 4 No applicable Research Team Consideration. CFC and HCFC deplete the ozone layer, allowing harmful ultraviolet radiation to penetrate through to the Earth's surface. Establish product specifications. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 55 Require or recommend sleeves/ sealants that ensure low transfer rates of radon. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Longer-term environmental considerations. Specifications may need to be established in project standards and procedures. Reduces exposure of workers and building occupants to radon. 55 Use biodegradable hydraulic elevator oils. Higher cost than mineral oils; however, reduces liability and costs for oil cleanup from spills and leaks. Reduces environmental issues caused by spills and leaks. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Can be domestically produced. 55 Provide incentives for reduced PVC use in site conduit applications and require all PVC used underground to be encased in concrete. Alternatives for piping include cast iron, steel, concrete, vitrified clay, and copper. Siding alternatives include fiber-cement board; stucco; recycled, reclaimed, or Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) certified sustainably harvested wood, OSB, brick, and polypropylene. PVC conduit is usually lower in cost than other forms of conduit. PVC poses major hazards in its manufacture, product life, and disposal. Toxic manufacturing byproducts include dioxin, ethylene dichloride, and vinyl chloride, which can cause cancer, endocrine disruption, neurological damage, birth defects and impaired child development, and other hazardous health effects. The additives required to manufacture PVC make large scale post consumer recycling problematic for most products and interfere with the recycling of other plastics. Alternatives: Flooring and carpet: linoleum, bamboo, ceramic tile, carpeting with natural fiber backing or polyolefins, reclaimed or FSC wood, cork, rubber, concrete, and non- chlorinated plastic polymers. Wall coverings and furniture: natural fibers such as wood and wool, polyethylene, polyester, and paint. Electrical insulation and sheathing: halogen free, linear low- density polyethylene, and thermoset crosslinked polyethylene. Windows and doors: recycled, reclaimed, or FSC wood, fiberglass, and aluminum. PVC poses a risk in building fires since it releases deadly gases long before it ignites. PVC is manufactured near low-income communities in Texas and Louisiana. The toxic impact of pollution from the PVC factories on the nearby communities has made them a focus in the environmental justice movement. 33, 55 (continued on next page)

A -74 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Building Interiors Use vitrified clay pipes (VCP) for drain piping in lieu of more expensive cast iron pipes. VCPs have a lifespan of 80 to 100 years because they are resistant to corrosion and chemical attack, abrasion, temperature, and impermeability, providing life cycle cost benefits. The raw materials for manufacturing VCPs are clay and recycled materials from the ceramic industry. The environmental impact of manufacturing VCPs is relatively small compared with most other types of sewer materials. Benefits include impermeability, hardness, and mechanical strength. Commonly used in sewer gravity collection mains because of its resistance to domestic and industrial sewage, particularly sulfuric acid. Only hydrofluoric acid and highly concentrated caustic wastes are known to attack VCP; wastes are not permitted to be discharged into a municipal sewage collection system without adequate pretreatment. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 12, 55 Do not use fiberglass insulation or duct liners that contain phenol formaldehyde binders. As a substitute, use loose fill or blown fiberglass insulation that requires no formaldehyde binder. Fiberglass insulation produced with acrylic binder or nonfiberglass battings made of cotton, sheep's wool, or mineral (rock or slag) wool can also be used. All of the alternative batting insulation products are made almost entirely from recycled or renewable materials. They offer similar thermal performance as fiberglass but at a slight cost premium. The extended use of fiberglass duct liners may result in microbial growth. A phenol-formaldehyde binder can off-gas and be a moderate indoor air quality concern. Most fiberglass insulation has at least 30 percent recycled glass content, but is made of boron, a finite recourse. Nonfiberglass batting offers similar thermal performance as fiberglass. Reduces exposure of workers and building occupants to formaldehyde. 55 Use a pressurized aerosol duct sealing for internally sealing existing heating and cooling HVAC ducts. LEED® EACredit 1 Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory testing demonstrated that aerosol sealing can reduce leakage by a factor of 5 to 8, saving an estimated $300 per year on the heating and cooling costs of a typical home. Aerosol duct sealing is easy to use compared with traditional methods, such as applying mastic, because it eliminates the need to open wall, floor, and ceiling cavities to access hard-to-reach leaks. An insignificant amount of adhesive particles are deposited on interior duct walls, and they have no harmful effect on the IAQ of a building. Before aerosol sealing, test ducts to determine the leakage volume. Aerosol sealing is not recommended for gaps larger than 0.25-inch. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 42

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -75 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Building Interiors Use duct mastics (gooey sealants that are painted on and allowed to harden) in lieu of duct tapes to minimize leakage effects. Duct mastics provide improved sealing over duct tapes, reducing energy costs. Maintenance costs may decrease due to less frequent application of duct tape. Improved sealing results in improved energy efficiency and lower heating/cooling demand, reducing emissions caused by HVAC operation. Duct tape does not adequately seal HVAC joints and has a short lifespan. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Electrical Materials Use and install compact fluorescent lighting (CFL). LEED® EA Credit 1 Consumes as little as one-fifth the power and lasts up to 13 times longer than incandescent fixtures. Reduces carbon monoxide emissions and emissions from the production and materials use due to the extended lifespan of CFL. Produces about 90 percent less heat than incandescent bulbs while delivering more light per watt. Reduces energy demand and improves air quality in the local community. 55 Use and install slim-profile lighting systems. LEED® EA Credit 1 Can save energy costs because of better lumen output and a thinner lamp. Reduces emissions from energy use; consider slim profile solar lights to enable remote use and/or to provide safety lighting. Provides a highly concentrated light source that can enhance the performance of the luminaries. Reduces energy demand and improves air quality in the local community. 55 Minimize the use of lit signage outdoors and maximize the use of photovoltaic panels for construction and warning signage where applicable. LEED® EACredit 1 Reduces energy costs. Reduces emissions from energy use. Photovoltaic panels can be placed in remote locations and do not require connection to a grid. Reduces energy demand; photovoltaic signage provides visible evidence of the airport's commitment to sustainability. 55 Use and install LED lights. LEED® EACredit 1 Consumes less energy than incandescent lights and often results in recovering the additional first cost within one year through energy savings; requires less maintenance and provides improved performance. All LED products should have a warranty of at least 5 years with a recycling program provided by the manufacturer. More energy efficient and longer lasting than incandescent lights, reducing emissions from power generation and production. Provide improved robustness, smaller size, faster switching, and greater durability and reliability. May require more precise current and heat management than traditional light sources. Solar-powered LED lights offer additional advantages, including application in remote location without grid access or as an emergency- response application. Reduces energy demand in the local community. 13, 55 Install photoluminescent signage for safety pathway markings, exit signs, and egress signage. LEED® EACredit 1 Requires no backup power supply, no conduit, no battery, and is easy to install. An electrician is needed to install light fixtures near the signs to meet manufacturer specifications and code requirements. The signs themselves do not draw any power; thus, their use does not generate emissions. Absorbs energy provided by visible and near-visible light and then releases that energy as light at a later time. Must be exposed to ambient light of a minimum intensity and type for a set period of time to absorb enough energy to emit useful light. The signage may not be properly charged and functional if an emergency occurs immediately after occupants enter a building. 55 (continued on next page)

A -76 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Electrical Materials Use bio-based transformer fluids. Bio-based oil can extend the service life of a transformer by enhancing its insulating life and performance. Reduces waste generation by prolonging the life of old, installed transformers (retrofitted with bio-based fluids). Reduces accidental contamination in the event of a leakage by using fluid that can degrade faster than conventional dielectric coolant. These fluids may improve equipment efficiency. Bio- based transformer fluids are not subject to federal regulation of used oils, but instead are covered by the Edible Oil Regulatory Reform Act. The food-grade formula and higher flash point result in a less hazardous working environment, and improve worker health and safety. Reduces fire-safety hazards associated with mineral oil. 37 Require early installation of permanent electrical systems to minimize the number of temporary circuits needed for construction activities. May reduce costs associated with the use (purchase or rent) of temporary circuits. Reduces emissions from energy use. May reduce safety hazards. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 For electrical systems, use telecommunications cabling and electrical device wall plates that have a high percentage of recycled plastic. Most recycled content products perform similarly to products containing only virgin materials and can be incorporated into projects with minimal to no cost premium. Reduces the impacts from extraction and processing of virgin materials. Establish recycled content goals during the design phase. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 55 Do not use halogen lights. YYZ Four halogen downlights are needed to provide the same effective general lighting levels as one 100 watt globe in the middle of a room. Additional energy is required as the use of a transformer usually located in the ceiling above each light fitting is required. The transformers can use an additional 10 percent to 30 percent of the bulb energy. More than 90 percent of the energy that goes into common halogen lights turns into heat; as a result, the lights use more electricity than needed, making them very inefficient. Halogen lights may pose a fire risk if not installed properly. Reduces energy demand and improves air quality in the local community. 31, 59 Polymer Concrete Surface Systems Use enamel waterborne epoxy and chemical-resistant waterbase methane products for architectural surface coatings. Polymer concrete surface systems protect against freeze-thaw cycles, chemical stains, and surface penetration; reduces associated maintenance and energy costs. Polymer concrete surface systems reduce the heat island effect; they are about 20°F cooler than light-colored concrete (available in a variety of colors). No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces heat islands in the local community, reducing temperature compared to absorptive materials. 5

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -77 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Polymer Concrete Surface Systems Use 100 percent solid, two-component epoxy resin for crack repair. Polymer concrete surface systems are a low- maintenance alternative to tile, hardwood, or carpet flooring and offer design flexibility. Also protects against freeze- thaw cycles, chemical stains, and surface penetration. Polymer concrete surface systems reduce the heat island effect; they are about 20° cooler than light-colored concrete. The epoxy resin is 5 times the strength of concrete. Reduces the need for rehabilitation, minimizing construction noise and traffic. 5 Use precolored matrix mixes that require no liquid colorant additives. Costs for most low-VOC products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. These precolored matrixes use dry pigments recovered from iron oxide runoff from coal mines, the largest single source of water pollution in the United States. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Protects water quality in the local community, especially near coal mines. 5 Use degreasers that are made of d- limonine, a terpene extracted from citrus peel oils. LEED® MRCredit 6 Cost competitive because these degreasers are an agricultural waste product. Citrus peel oils are an agricultural waste product, as well as a rapidly renewable product. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces agricultural waste in local communities. 5 Use an acrylic sealer to complete the third and final part of a polymer concrete surface system. Polymer concrete surface systems are a low- maintenance alternative to tile, hardwood, or carpet flooring and offer design flexibility. Also protects against freeze- thaw cycles, chemical stains, and surface penetration. Resistant to ultraviolet rays and abrasions; protects surfaces from moisture penetration, staining, dirt, dust, and wear. Provides a non-porous surface finish that protects and enhances the finished application for both vertical and horizontal installations. Provides a non-yellowing coating and may enhance color retention, maintaining aesthetics. 5 (continued on next page)

A -78 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Polymer Concrete Surface Systems Use an elastomeric acrylic caulk in concrete slab expansion joints and masonry perimeters, and for sealing around doors and windows. Can be used to refurbish old or damaged floors. Polymer concrete surface systems are a low- maintenance alternative to tile, hardwood, or carpet flooring and offer design flexibility. Also protects against freeze- thaw cycles, chemical stains, and surface penetration. The elastomer acrylic caulk should be composed primarily of natural ingredients, such as calcium carbonate, potassium, and sand. Provides a surface that is easy to clean and maintain; dries quickly, reducing down time. Provides a paintable surface to maintain aesthetics. 5 Low-Emitting Materials For adhesives and sealants, the VOC content used must be less than the current VOC content limits of South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD) Rule #1168, and all sealants used as fillers must meet or exceed the requirements of the Bay Area Air Quality Management District Regulation 8, Rule 51. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 ORD Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 19, 64 For field applications that are inside the weatherproofing system, use adhesives and sealants that comply with the limits for VOC content calculated according to 40 CFR 59, Subpart D. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 13, 64

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -79 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Low-Emitting Materials Do not use adhesives or sealants that use mercury and/or persistent, bioaccumulative, and toxic pollutants. Health concerns associated with exposure to mercury and PBT result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Mercury does not degrade in the environment. Human nervous systems are sensitive to all forms of Mercury. Methylmercury (caused by sulfate reducing bacteria) bioaccumulates in organisms as it moves through the food chain, adversely affecting humans, fish, and waterfowl. Mercury negatively affects the nervous system of installers and building occupants. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 22 Use water-based adhesives and sealants that contain no VOCs on porous or nonporous surfaces. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. VOCs react with sunlight and nitrogen oxides in the atmosphere to form ground- level ozone, a chemical that has a detrimental effect on human health, agricultural crops, forests, and ecosystems. No fire or explosion hazards. May require longer drying times. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 55 Seal interior concealed joints to reduce airborne sound transmission by using nondrying, nonhardening, nonskinning, nonstaining, gunnable, synthetic-rubber sealant with a VOC content of 250 grams per liter or less when calculated according to 40 CFR 59, Subpart D (EPA Method 24). LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Obtain a recommendation in writing by the ornamental formed-metal manufacturer. Reduces noise in the local community. 13 (continued on next page)

A -80 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Low-Emitting Materials Use nonsagging, paintable, nonstaining latex sealant complying with American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) C 834; of type and grade required to seal joints in ornamental formed metal. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when they are first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces noise transmission through perimeter joints and openings. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 13 Use aliphatic-resin, polyurethane, or resorcinol wood glue. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.1 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. No applicable Research Team Consideration. 13 Use zero- or low-VOC field-applied paints and coatings. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.2 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 2

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -81 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Low-Emitting Materials Follow standards and prohibitions documented in SCAQMD Rule 1113 (paints and coatings) and applicable source-specific SCAQMD standards. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.2 LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 39 For interior paints and coatings, VOC emissions must not exceed the VOC and chemical component limits of Green Seal’s Standard GS-11 requirements. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.2 ORD Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 19 For field applications that are inside the weatherproofing system, use paints and coatings that comply with the limits for VOC content when calculated according to 40 CFR 59, Subpart D. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.2 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 13 (continued on next page)

A -82 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Low-Emitting Materials For carpet systems, VOC emissions must meet or exceed the requirements of the Carpet and Rug Institute's Green Label Indoor Air Quality Test Program. Composite wood and agrifiber must contain no added urea formaldehyde resins. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.3 ORD Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 19 Specify low-VOC carpet systems. Ensure that VOC limits are clearly stated where carpet systems are addressed. Be attentive to carpet installation requirements. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.3 ORD Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 19 Install VOC-free natural linoleum flooring, reclaimed wood products (such as remilled structural timbers), recycled glass tile, or ceramic tile in lieu of carpet materials that contain VOCs. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.3 Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with costs for conventional materials, but may be more expensive when first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 55 Do not install vinyl flooring with high PVC content. Carpet containing PVC can release toxic chemicals, including dioxin, into the air; PVC often contains phthalate- based softening agents, which are recognized as reproductive toxins that may contribute to indoor pollution. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.3 Non-PVC flooring has a higher cost because of the widespread use and availability of polyvinyl chloride. PVC is not biodegradable. Long-term leeching could lead to ground water contamination. If burned, PVC releases harmful gases. It is highly toxic during production. Recycling is difficult because of the diverse additives used. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Protects installers and building occupants. 55

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -83 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Low-Emitting Materials Use natural linoleum flooring or reclaimed wood products, such as remilled structural timbers. LEED® IEQ Credit 4.3 Typically more expensive than vinyl flooring. Renewable and biodegradable. Natural linoleum flooring is made from linseed oil, pine resin, wood flour, cork powder, limestone dust, natural pigments, and jute. Durable and resilient. Has a 30-40 year lifespan compared to a 10-20 year lifespan for vinyl flooring. Protects installers and building occupants. 55 Clean up carpet spills immediately to prevent stains and fungus. Perform extraction cleaning every 6 to 12 months, preferably with hot water or steam. Helps ensure a long life cycle of carpeted areas, thereby reducing costs associated with carpet replacement. Improves indoor air quality and reduces emissions associated with the production and transport of new carpeting. May require additional labor and/or staffing. Protects installers and building occupants. 55 Vacuum heavily trafficked areas daily using equipment with powerful suction and a HEPA filtration bag. Helps ensure a long life cycle of carpeted areas, thereby reducing costs associated with carpet replacement. Improves indoor air quality and reduces emissions associated with the production and transport of new carpeting. May require additional labor and/or staffing. Protects installers and building occupants from exposure to dust and other pollutants. 55 During deconstruction, vacuum old carpets prior to removal using a certified Carpet and Rug Institute (CRI) Green Label vacuum cleaner. Also vacuum the floor immediately after old carpet is removed. May reduce health expenses for construction workers. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. May require additional labor and/or staffing. Protects workers from exposure to dust and other pollutants. 43 Ensure that all shop-finished materials meet the VOC emission requirements. Materials to consider are primed steel; finished metals, including aluminum, finished millwork, and finished steel; and wood doors and windows. Costs for most low-VOC- content products are generally competitive with conventional materials but may be more expensive when they are first introduced into the marketplace. Health concerns associated with VOCs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. VOCs also contribute to smog generation and outdoor air pollution. Use of high VOC-content materials can cause illness and may decrease occupant productivity. Consider the location of the manufacturer, durability, and performance. Protects installers and building occupants. 2 Remove all equipment containing polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB). HNL Health concerns associated with PCBs result in increased expenses and liability for building owners, operators, and insurance companies. Reduces the environmental risk from leakage resulting from deterioration or damaged equipment. PCBs cause skin problems in adults and neurobehavioral and immunological changes in children. PCBs are known to cause cancer in animals. PCBs do not readily break down in the environment. Reduces the risk of exposure to hazardous combustion byproducts in case of fire. Reduce risks to occupants from exposure to PCB. 38, 63 (continued on next page)

A -84 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Certified Wood Establish an FSC-certified wood products goal and identify suitable suppliers. This includes, but is not limited to: structural framing and general dimensional framing, flooring, finishes, furnishings, and non- rented temporary construction applications, such as bracing, concrete form work, and pedestrian barriers. Wood-based materials and products should be compared with the total value of the materials in the task/project. LEED® MRCredit 7 SFO, ORD The cost of FSC-certified wood is equal to or higher than the cost for conventional wood products and varies by region. Encourages environmentally responsible forest management. Irresponsible forest practices result in destruction of forests and wildlife habitat, soil erosion and stream sedimentation, water and air pollution, and waste generation. No applicable Research Team Consideration. Respects indigenous peoples' rights and adheres to applicable laws and treaties. Preserves forest land for future generations. Benefits responsible forest workers and forest- dependent communities. 2, 64 Use FSC-certified products in temporary and permanent construction materials and finished products; meet established FSC goals (www.fscus.org/green_building). LEED® MRCredit 7 SFO, ORD The cost of FSC-certified wood is equal to or higher than the cost for conventional wood products and varies by region. Encourages environmentally responsible forest management. Irresponsible forest practices result in destruction of forests and wildlife habitat, soil erosion and stream sedimentation, water and air pollution, and waste generation. May require a tracking system and personnel to monitor compliance. Respects indigenous peoples' rights and adheres to applicable laws and treaties. Preserves forest land for future generations. Benefits responsible forest workers and forest- dependent communities. 2, 64 Ensure that the FSC-certified wood products are installed and quantify the total percentage of FSC-certified wood products installed. LEED® MRCredit 7 ORD The cost of FSC-certified wood is equal to or higher than the cost for conventional wood products and varies by region. Encourages environmentally responsible forest management. Irresponsible forest practices result in destruction of forests and wildlife habitat, soil erosion and stream sedimentation, water and air pollution, and waste generation. May require a tracking system and personnel to monitor compliance. Respects indigenous peoples' rights and adheres to applicable laws and treaties. Preserves forest land for future generations. Benefits responsible forest workers and forest- dependent communities. 19, 64 Wood Preservatives Prohibit the use of creosote-coated lumber. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. May reduce product life cycle. Creosote-treated lumber emits a bad odor, can soil clothes, has vapors that are toxic to plants, and is difficult to saw, sand, and paint. Direct contact can cause skin irritation and plant damage or death. 39 Reduce the requirements for preservative-treated wood. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD No applicable Research Team Consideration. Reduces the quantity of indoor air contaminants that are odorous, irritating, and/or harmful to the comfort and well-being of installers and occupants. May reduce product life cycle. Any treated material shipped to the construction site should be stored out of contact with standing water and wet soil and protected from precipitation. Preservative-treated lumber may emit a bad odor, soil clothes, have vapors that are toxic to plants, and be difficult to saw, sand, and paint. Direct contact can cause skin irritation and plant damage or death. 39

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -85 LEED® Research Team Considerations Sustainable Practice LEED® LEED® Credit Example(s) Economic Environmental Operational Social Source (see reference below) Sustainable Materials Wood Preservatives Do not use chromate copper arsenate (CCA) pressure-treated lumber. Use lumber that is treated with less toxic, borate-based chemicals for dry conditions and use Ammoniacal Copper Quaternary (ACQ) for wet conditions. LAX, ONT, VNY, PMD The cost of site-applied borate treatments exceeds the costs of other chemical treatments because of shipping costs (limited availability). ACQ typically has a higher cost than CCA. CCA is no longer being produced for residential or general consumer use. Burning, mechanical abrasion, direct contact with wood, sawdust, and acidic rainfall can release arsenic in CCA-treated lumber. Use sustainably harvested wood independently certified by organizations such as the FSC, Smartwood Program of the Rainforest Alliance, and Scientific Certification Systems. ACQ is less toxic than CCA and performs similarly. Full-scale commercial introduction of borates in the United States has slowed because of the leaching problem of borates. As borates are water soluble, water dilutes them and leaves the wood unprotected from decay after a period of time. In a location unexposed to water, they are effective in preserving wood. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 39, 55 Use expanded polystyrene (EPS) foam instead of extruded polystyrene (XPS) for rigid board insulation. EPS costs less than XPS. EPS is the only common rigid foam board stock insulation made with neither CFCs nor HCFCs. However, XPS is stronger, denser, smoother, and more water-resistant, and has a higher R-value per inch. If the correct density is chosen for the application, EPS is not affected by moisture. EPS insulation installation is simpler; it can be molded and shaped easily. XPS is flammable and must be protected by a 15 minute thermal barrier, such as 0.5 inch of gypsum board. Enhances safety; encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 55 Use recycled wood/plastic composite lumber in structural applications as an alternative to synthetic wood materials. LEED® MRCredit 4 Cost-competitive with high-end materials such as finger jointed pine and redwood, but more expensive than standard treated products. Uses recycled plastic trash bags and waste wood fibers. Contains none of the toxic chemicals used in conventionally treated lumber. Reduces the amount of virgin materials used in production. Manufacturers claim it is more durable than conventional preservative- treated lumber because the wood fibers act as reinforcement; the plastic encapsulates and binds the wood together to resist moisture penetration. May weigh more than standard lumber products. Encourages manufacturers to produce products in a more environmentally- conscious manner. 42, 55 Sources: 1 Advanced Drainage Systems, Inc. FLEXSTORM Inlet Filters, 2009 Product Brochure, www.inletfilters.com (accessed April 9, 2010). 2 Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA) Sustainability Working Group, Gene Peters, Ricondo & Associates, Inc. & James Crites, Dallas/Ft. Worth International Airport. DRAFT Sustainable Initiatives Index, March 14, 2006, www.aci-na.org/static/entransit/Sustainability Index.pdf (accessed July 8, 2009). 3 ACRP 08-01 Research Team, 2009/2010. 4 Al-Qadi, Imad L., William G. Buttlar, Jongeun Baek, and Minkyum Kim. Cost-Effectiveness and Performance of Overlay Systems in Illinois. Volume 1: Effectiveness Assessment of HMA Overlay Interlayer Systems Used to Retard Reflective Cracking, Research Report ICT-09-044, Illinois Center for Transportation, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, May 2009. 5 Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) Daily. “Polymer Concrete Surface Systems: A Green and Sustainable Solution,” 2008, www.aecdaily.com (accessed February 10, 2010). 6 ASCE (American Society of Civil Engineers) Publications Database. “Properties of Soundless Chemical Demolition Agents,” Journal of Construction Engineering and Management, Vol. 120, No. 4, Pgs. 816-827, December 1994. 7 Asphalt Pavement Alliance. Asphalt: the Sustainable Pavement, 2006, http://asphaltalliance.com/upload/ Asphalt-The-Sustainable-Pavement_324654808_102 72006175031.pdf (accessed January 7, 2010).

A -86 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). 8 Asphalt Rubber Technology Service, Clemson University. “Benefits of Rubberized Asphalt,” 2009, www.ces.clemson.edu/arts/benefitsofRA.html (accessed March 3, 2010). 9 Barrilleaux, Janell, Tom Sommers, and Mike Steppens, City and County of Denver, Department of Aviation. Interview conducted on November 19, 2009. 10 Bayne, William, Patten Industries. Interview conducted in November 2009. 11 Blumenthal, Michael. “Scrap Tires Fuel U.S. Cement Industry,” Cement Americas, July 1, 2004. 12 Boiten, Stephen. Keramo Steinzeug N.V. “Why Vitrified Clay?” March 2008, www.steinzeug-keramo.com/CMS/upload/Why_vitrified_clay_def_3992.pdf (accessed March 5, 2010). 13 Build LACCD, LACCD Sustainable Design Standards, Los Angeles Community College District, 2009, http://standards.build- laccd.org/projects/dcs/pub/Sustain%20Design%20Standards/released/PV-001.pdf (accessed March 21, 2010). 14 Caterpillar, Inc. Edwards Demonstration and Learning Center, Peoria, Illinois, April 6, 2010. 15 City and County of Denver, Colorado. Denver International Airport 2008 Sustainability Summary, (2008), www.flydenver.com/diabiz/community/ enviro/documents/2008summary.pdf. 16 City and County of San Francisco Airport Commission. San Francisco International Airport 2007 Environmental Sustainability Report, June 2007, www.flysfo.com/web/ export/sites/default/download/about/reports/pdf/ESReport.pdf (accessed July 22, 2009). 17 City of Berkeley, California, Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Environmental Health. “Construction Noise Standards,” Pgs. 1-2, September 2009, www.lbl.gov/LBL- Work/siteconstruction/assets/docs/Berkeley-construction-noise.pdf (accessed February 2, 2010). 18 City of Chicago, Department of Aviation. Sustainable Airport Manual (SAM), August 5, 2009, www.airportsgoinggreen.org/Content/ Documents/CDA SAM - v1.0 – August 5 2009 - FINAL.pdf (accessed August 19, 2009). 19 City of Chicago, O’Hare Modernization Program Office. O'Hare International Airport (ORD) Sustainable Design Manual (SDM), December, 2003. 20 Civil Engineering Environmental Quality Assessment and Awards Scheme. CEEQUAL Scheme Description and Assessment Process Handbook, December 2008. 21 CONSTRUCTOR Magazine (Ben Herring), the Associated General Contractors of America. “The Secrets of Roman Concrete,” Pgs. 13-15, September 2002. 22 Contra Costa Clean Water Program (Carrie Dovzak and Chris Sommers). “Pollutants of Concern Source Assessment Report, July 1, 2004, www.cccleanwater.org/_pdfs/2004_POC_Report.pdf (accessed March 8, 2010). 23 Crook, Ann B., AAE, Elmira Corning Regional Airport. Interview conducted on November 17, 2009. 24 Ecology and Environment, Inc. Hazardous Waste Management Plan for General Mitchell International Airport - Air Reserve Station, September 13, 2002, www.afcee.af.mil/shared/media/ document/AFD-070827-068.pdf (accessed July 21, 2009). 25 ENR.com, Tudor Van Hampton, Contractor Takes Keys to World's First 'Hybrid' Dozer, December 23, 2009, http://enr.construction.com/products/equipment/2009/1223-HybridBulldozer.asp 26 Environmental Building News (Alex Wilson). “Straw: The Next Great Building Material?” May 1, 1995, www.buildinggreen.com/auth/article.cfm/1995/5/1/Straw-The-Next-Great-Building- Material/ (accessed March 5, 2010). 27 Federal Aviation Administration, September 2005. Record of Decision for O’Hare Modernization at Chicago O’Hare International Airport. 28 Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation. “Special Report: Highway Construction Noise: Measurement, Prediction, and Mitigation,” Final Report, August 2006. 29 Freeman, Thomas J., P.E., Texas Transportation Institute. Interview conducted on November 30, 2009. 30 Fuhrmann, Thomas J., Metropolitan Airports Commission. Interview conducted on November 16, 2009. 31 Gray, Derek R., Greater Toronto Airports Authority. Interview conducted on November 24, 2009. 32 GreenAirOnline.com. “Boston Logan Becomes the First US Airport to use 'Green' Asphalt on a Runway Repaving Project,” August 28, 2008, www.greenaironline.com/news.php?viewStory=238 (accessed March 1, 2010). 33 Healthy Building Network. “PVC in Buildings: Hazards and Alternatives,” January 11, 2006, www.healthybuilding.net/pvc/facts.html, (accessed March 5, 2010). 34 Howell, Gregory A. “What is Lean Construction?” July 1999, www.leanconstruction.org/pdf/Howell.pdf (accessed February 3, 2010). 35 Ichinotsubo, Guy and Wendy Chuk (State of Hawaii, Airports Division), and Ashley Wilhelm (Green Building Services Consultant). Interview conducted on November 18, 2009. 36 Johnson, Scott. Caterpillar, Inc. “Equipment Spotlight,” Presentation at the Innovations Conference on Asphalt and Transportation, Peoria, Illinois, April 6, 2010. 37 Joint Service and Pollution Prevention Sustainability Library, “About Time to Switch out your Transformers? Go Green!” January 2008, www.p2sustainabilitylibrary.mil/p2_documents/eqi_transformerfluids.pdf (accessed March 5, 2010). 38 KYA Design Group, and State of Hawaii, Department of Transportation. Honolulu International Airport Sustainable High Performance Guidelines (SHPG), February 2009, www.hawaiiairportsmodernization.com/assets/HNLSHPGFINALv112009-3-19.pdf (accessed July 23, 2009). 39 Los Angeles World Airports. Los Angeles World Airports (LAWA) Sustainable Airport Planning, Design and Construction Guidelines, April 2009, www.lawa.org/uploadedFiles/LAWA/pdf/Sustainable Airport PDC Guidelines Jan08.pdf (accessed July 23, 2009). 40 McEvoy, Thomas, High Concrete Group. Interview conducted on November 19, 2009. 41 Minneapolis 311, the City of Minneapolis Anti-Idling Vehicle Ordinance. “Anti-Idling Vehicle Ordinance – Fact Sheet,” August 2008, www.ci.minneapolis.mn.us/airquality/VehicleIdling_Factsheet.doc (accessed February 3, 2010). 42 National Association of Home Builders Research Center, Partnership for Advancing Technology in Housing, Toolbase Services. “Technology Inventory: Accelerating Awareness of Housing Innovations,” 2008, www.toolbase.org/Technology-Inventory/walls/fiber-cement-siding, (accessed February 11, 2010). 43 National Institute of Building Sciences, Whole Building Design Guide. “Federal Green Construction Guide for Specifiers,” July 2007, www.wbdg.org/design/greenspec.php (accessed February 10, 2010).

Collection Sorted by Construction Practice Categories A -87 44 National Lime Association. Using Lime for Soil Stabilization and Modification (March 2001), www.lime.org/soil2.pdf (accessed July 24, 2009). 45 Nasvik, Joe. “3-D Laser Scanning,” Concrete Construction Magazine, July 1, 2007, www.concreteconstruction.net/ (accessed April 9, 2010). 46 Nelis, Patricia, Salt Lake City Department of Airport. Interview conducted on November 19, 2009. 47 North Carolina Radon Program. “Radon Resistant New Construction,” January 25, 2006, www.ncradon.org/docs/construction.pdf (accessed March 9, 2010). 48 O’Donnell, Jayne, Turner Construction Company. Interview conducted in November 2009. 49 Oberhelman, Doug. Caterpillar, Inc. “Overview of the Current Global Economy,” Presentation at the Innovations Conference on Asphalt and Transportation, Peoria, Illinois, April 6, 2010. 50 Parker, Cynthia, David Hansley, and Kate O’Malley, City of Phoenix Aviation Department. Interview conducted on November 10, 2009. 51 Peacock, Steven S., Dallas Department of Aviation. Interview conducted on November 13, 2009. 52 Pearce, Annie R., Virginia Tech University. Interview conducted on December 7, 2009. 53 Port of Portland. Construction Master Specifications, October 2008, www.portofportland.com/ Eng_Specs.aspx (accessed July 21, 2009). 54 Poudre School District. Sustainable Design Guidelines for the Construction of New Facilities and the Renovation of Existing Structures, June 2005, www.psdschools.com/documentlibrary/ downloads/plan_design_and_construction/sustainable_design_guidelines_2005.pdf (accessed July 23, 2009). 55 Pulaski, Michael H. and The Partnership for Achieving Construction Excellence Research Team. Pennsylvania State University & the Pentagon Renovation and Construction Program Office, Field Guide for Sustainable Construction, The Pennsylvania State University, State College, June 2004, www.wbdg.org/ccb/COOL/fieldg.pdf (accessed July 21, 2009). 56 Riley, David R., Pennsylvania State University Lean & Green Research Initiative. Interview conducted on December 2, 2009. 57 Sustainable Aviation Guidance Alliance. “Sustainable Aviation Guidance Alliance Sustainability Program Database,” 2009, www.airportsustainability.org/database#, Version 10/09/09 (accessed November 2009). 58 Salt Lake City Department of Airports, “Making the Business Connection to Airport Sustainability,” Carter & Burgess, Inc., Final, 2007, www.slcairport.com/pdf/environmental/sustainability.pdf (accessed July 23, 2009). 59 Sanctuary Magazine, Australia’s Leading Environmental Homes. “The Low-Down on Downlights,” Issue 4, 2009, www.sanctuarymagazine.org.au/articles/living-room/the-low-down-on- downlights (accessed February 15, 2010). 60 Shank, Paul L., P.E., C.M., Maryland Aviation Administration. Interview conducted on November 18, 2009. 61 StormwaterAuthority.org, Center for Watershed Protection, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA, USDA, USGS). “Porous Pavements,” February 7, 2005, www.stormwaterauthority.org/assets/Porous%20Pavement.pdf (accessed February 15, 2010). 62 Tommelein, Iris D., University of California, Berkeley. Interview conducted on November 30, 2009. 63 United States Green Building Council (USGBC), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). Reference Guide for Existing Buildings, Version 2.0, October 2006. 64 United States Green Building Council (USGBC), Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED). 2009 Green Building Rating System for New Construction & Major Renovation, 2009. 65 Warkoski, Jeffrey, Reynolds, Smith & Hill. Interview conducted on November 16, 2009. 66 Waste & Resources Action Programme. Reducing Material Wastage in Construction, October 2007, http://www.wrap.org.uk/downloads/Reducing_Material_Wastage_in_ Construction.0b1e535f.4711.pdf (accessed January 7, 2010). 67 Waste & Resources Action Programme. Construction Procurement Guide, March 2009, http://www.wrap.org.uk/downloads/WRAP_Construction_Procurement_Guide. fffc9b6c.6736.pdf (accessed January 7, 2010). 68 Williams, Christopher, Iowa State University, “Recycled Roof Shingles in Hot Mix Asphalt,” Presentation at the Innovations Conference on Asphalt and Transportation (ICAT), Peoria, Illinois, April 6, 2010.

A -88 Sustainable Airport Construction Practices Appendix A. (Continued). Acronyms: AC – Air Conditioning ACQ – Ammoniacal Copper Quaternary ASHRAE – American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers ASTM – American Society for Testing of Materials BMP – Best Management Practices BOS – Boston Logan International Airport BWI – Baltimore-Washington International Airport CARB – California Air Resources Board CCA – Chromate Copper Arsenate CFC – chlorofluorocarbon CLF – Compact Fluorescent Lighting CFR – Code of Federal Regulations CRI – Carpet and Rug Institute CRRC – Cool Roof Rating Council DAL – Dallas Love Field Airport dB – decibel DBE – Disadvantaged Business Enterprise DEN – Denver International Airport DFW – Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport DOC – Diesel Oxidation Catalysts EA – Energy and Atmosphere EGGD – Bristol International Airport EGKK – London Gatwick Airport EMAS – Engineered Materials Arresting System EMS – Environmental Management System EONS – Economics, Operational, Natural Resources, and Social EPS – Expanded Polystyrene ETS – Environmental Tobacco Smoke F45 – North Palm Beach County General Aviation Airport (Florida) FAA – Federal Aviation Administration FSC – Forest Stewardship Council GHG – Greenhouse Gas GGBF – Ground Granulated Blast Furnace GPS – Global Positioning System HCFC – hydrochlorofluorocarbon HDPE – High Density PolyEthylene HECA – Cairo International Airport HEPA – High Efficiency Particulate Air HPS – High Pressure Sodium HNL – Honolulu International Airport HVAC – Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning IAQ – Indoor Air Quality ICF – Insulating Concrete Form ID – Innovation in Design IEQ – Indoor Environmental Quality LAX – Los Angeles International Airport LCA – Life Cycle Assessment LED – Light-Emitting Diode LEED® – Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design LEED® AP – LEED Accredited Professional LGAV – Athens (Eleftherios Venizeolos) International Airport LNA – Palm Beach County Park Airport (West Palm Beach, Florida) MBE – Minority Business Enterprise MERV – Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value MH – Metal Halide MKE – General Mitchell International Airport MR – Materials and Resources MSDS – Material Safety Data Sheets MSP – Minneapolis-St. Paul International Airport NESHAP – National Emissions Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants NiCad – Nickel-Cadmium NOx – Nitrogen oxides ONT – Ontario International Airport ORD – O’Hare International Airport OSB – Oriented-Strand Board OSHA – Occupational, Health and Safety Administration PBI – Palm Beach International Airport PBT – Persistent, Bioaccumulative, and Toxic PCB – Polychlorinated biphenyl PCCP – Prestressed Concrete Cylinder Pipe PDX – Portland International Airport PMD – Los Angeles/Palmdale Regional Airport PVC – Polyvinyl Chloride RBD – Dallas Executive Airport RFP – Request for Proposal RFQ – Request for Qualifications RMA – Rubber Modified Asphalt RR – Rapidly Renewable SCAQMD – South Coast Air Quality Management District SCDA – Soundless Chemical Demolition Agents SESC – Soil Erosion and Sediment Control SFO – San Francisco International Airport SIP – Structural Insulated Panels SLC – Salt Lake City International Airport SPCC – Spill Prevention Control and Countermeasure Plan SRI – Solar Reflectance Index SS – Sustainable Sites STL – Lambert-St. Louis International Airport SWPPP – Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan TDF – Tire-Derived Fuel TMA – Transportation Management Association TPO – Thermoplastic Olefins TVY – Bolinder Field-Tooele Valley Airport (Utah) U42 – South Valley Regional Airport (Utah) ULSD – Ultra Low Sulfur Diesel USDOE – U.S. Department of Energy USEPA – U.S. Environmental Protection Agency USGBC – U.S. Green Building Council VCP – Vitrified Clay Pipes VNY – Van Nuys Airport VOC – Volatile Organic Compounds WBDG – Whole Building Design Guide WE – Water Efficiency WRAP – Waste Resource Action Programme XPS – Extruded Polystyrene YYZ – Toronto Pearson International Airport

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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Report 42: Sustainable Airport Construction Practices explores a set of best practices, methods, procedures, and materials that if implemented during construction may have a sustainable, positive economic, operational, environmental, or social effect.

The report includes the collection of sustainable airport construction practices in a searchable, filterable spreadsheet format on a CD-ROM, which is packaged with the report.

The CD-ROM included as part of ACRP Report 42 is also available for download from TRB’s website as an ISO image. Links to the ISO image and instructions for burning a CD-ROM from an ISO image are provided below.

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