National Academies Press: OpenBook

Developing Transportation Agency Leaders (2005)

Chapter: Appendix C - Narrative Responses

« Previous: Appendix B - States Returning Questionnaires
Page 41
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
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Page 42
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
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Page 42
Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 44
Page 45
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 45
Page 46
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 46
Page 47
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C - Narrative Responses." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
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41 Demographics—Part I, Question 11 Other Demographic Info Florida Motor Carrier Compliance Office (MCCO)—Protect Florida’s transportation infrastructure from accelerated damage caused by oversize and overweight vehicles. Ensure public safety by protecting lives and property through a program of enforcing both state and federal laws, including both traffic and crimi- nal laws in which the MCCO has jurisdiction. State Materials Laboratory—Develop and implement a state- wide sampling and testing (acceptance) program and certify compliance of completed projects. Provide Districts with information and support services to implement construction and maintenance operations. Assist Districts in solving materials-related problems during construction. Provide tech- nical laboratory and field-testing support. Perform in-house research and assist in the technical management and assign- ment of outside research to find better ways of using existing materials. Investigate the potential of new materials or processes for usage in highway construction Hawaii Location: We are an island state with limited human and fis- cal resources. Critical shortage of available, qualified pro- fessionals; i.e., engineers, surveyors, and technicians. There are ongoing efforts to tap into the Highway Special Fund for nontransit uses and to abolish established positions. Michigan Question 8: Data are only available for the entire DOT. Of Michigan DOT’s employees, 12% have more than 25 years of service and therefore are eligible for retirement. Missouri Missouri state agencies’ workforce has been affected by the “80 and out” rule; where, if the combination of an employee’s age and years of service equal 80, the employee is eligible to retire with full benefits. New Hampshire Average length of service for employees is 13 years. Tennessee 922, total leadership development candidates 742, male white—80% 90, female white—10% 65, male Asian/African American/other—7% 25, female Asian/African American/other—3% APPENDIX C Narrative Responses Utah Our organization experienced several retirements from the ranks of senior leaders 3–5 years ago. We now, generally, have senior leaders who are mid-career with 10–15 years until their retirement. Recruitment—Part II, Question 5 What core competencies are important for leaders in your organization? Alaska Analytical thinkers, visionary planners, registered profes- sionals, leadership. Arizona We have a leadership matrix with competencies at each level. Arkansas Ability to make a decision, works well with others, diplomatic. California Change leadership; strategic thinking, communication, team building, and motivation; self-awareness; and personal growth. Florida Florida DOT senior leaders identified five (5) core compe- tencies executives and managers must possess to lead today’s FDOT. 1. Leading People • Teambuilding, cultural awareness, integrity, honesty, conflict skills. 2. Leading Change • Ability to communicate a vision and energize the orga- nization to action to reach it. • Recognizes and understands internal and external forces impacting the organization. • Ability to influence others to embrace change. 3. Communications and Building Coalitions • Interpersonal skills, oral communication, written com- munication, negotiating, influencing, partnering. 4. Business Judgment • Selecting the right people for the right job. • Managing the budget. • Prudent risk taking. • Well-trained workforce. 5. Results Driven • Timely decisions, but well-informed. • Accountability and empowerment. • Structuring and organizing work to meet valid customer requirements.

42 Georgia Problem solving, respects dignity of others, collaborative and team player, organizational commitment, decisiveness. Hawaii Highway Program Administration—state and federal-aid pro- grams; personnel management; public policy administration; fiscal management; public relations/public speaking; media relations; networking with business, political, and bureaucratic stakeholders; organizational development and the manage- ment of change; understanding the functions within the high- way project system delivery continuum—systems planning, long- and short-range planning, fiscal management, right-of- way, design, construction, maintenance, operations, etc. Idaho Strategic thinking, visioning, partnering, leadership. Iowa Administration and management, conflict resolution, creativ- ity and innovation, decision making, external awareness, financial management, human resources management, nego- tiation skills, integrity and honesty, interpersonal skills, lead- ership, planning and evaluating, strategic thinking, written and oral communications skills. Kansas Under development. Kentucky People skills, decision making, organizational skills, time management, speaking public, writing, math/technical, and strategic thinking. Louisiana Good people skills, inter-functional, knowledge/cooperation, change management, ethical behavior, planning, problem solv- ing, communication/listening, innovativeness, future-oriented, influence, team building. Maryland Strategic focus: change management, technology management and application, vision. Business focus: budgeting, business knowledge, creativity and innovation, quality centered, plan- ning and executing, problem solving and decision making. Workforce focus: coaching, commitment to workforce diver- sity, human resource management, team leadership. Inter- personal focus: conflict resolution and negotiation, interper- sonal skills, influencing, oral communication, writing. Personal focus: action orientation, flexibility, results focus, role mod- eling, time management, self-development. Michigan Building trust, communications, developing a successful team, facilitating change, leading through vision and values. Missouri Communication—listening, speaking, writing, delivering pre- sentations; Interpersonal skills—managing conflict, exhibit- ing empathy, negotiating, networking and organizational awareness; Self-management—working with integrity, man- aging emotions, adapting to change, managing time; Leader- ship—influencing, coaching, developing, delegating, build- ing teamwork, motivating, championing change, encouraging creative solutions; Managing for results—managing proj- ects, applied performance management, developing business plan, managing finances, managing policy compliance, using process improvement tools. Nebraska (A) Leading people, (B) leading change, (C) business acumen/ results driven, (D) building coalitions/communications, and (E) strategic thinking. New Hampshire Communication skills, performance measure assessment, coor- dination, strategic thinking. Ohio Core competencies of importance for leaders in our organi- zation include: decision makers; risk takers; people skills; communications, written/oral/presentation; fiscal capacities; business management; info technical abilities skilled in tech- nical areas relative to position; well-informed, accountable. Oklahoma Technical expertise, political acumen, communication, prob- lem solving, and human resource management. Oregon Leadership abilities vs. management, leadership in charge of management, performance measurement, strategic thinking/ planning/futuristic planning, visionary skills, ability to obtain buy-in/cooperation, negotiation, partnering/relationship build- ing skills, public speaking, politically savvy. South Carolina Organizational change and development: leading and man- aging change, strategic planning, visioning, and budgeting and resource balancing; managing and sharing knowledge; communication skills; human resources management: men- toring and coaching, team building, leveraging diversity, moti- vating, recognizing, and rewarding; problem solving and decision making: thinking. Tennessee Leadership, communication, organizational effectiveness, peo- ple management, operational management, strategic thinking, and change management. Utah Leadership skills, administrative skills, interpersonal skills, communication skills, thinking ability, self-management, tech-

43 nical knowledge, ability to motivate others, ability to address the concerns of citizens. Virginia a. Knowledge (bodies of information). b. Skills, abilities (capacities to perform). c. Personal characteristics. d. Person-based factors that distinguish superior performance from average performance. Specific competencies include: 1. Dealing with ambiguity 2. Timely decision making 3. Decision quality 4. Delegation 5. Ethics and values 6. Integrity and trust 7. Interpersonal savvy 8. Perspective 9. Priority setting 10. Drive for results 11. Strategic agility 12. Managing vision and purpose 13. Highway transportation operations 14. Engineering principles and practices 15. Project management 16. Planning and execution. Recruitment—Part II, Question 7 What more could your agency do to increase the likeli- hood that capable individuals are prepared and retained to fill important leadership/management positions in the future? Alaska Provide cross training and mentoring opportunities; also opportunities to act in leadership roles. Arizona Pay for performance (statutory limitations). Arkansas More leadership/management training. California Rotational assignments; training and development assign- ments; special assignments/projects; executive, leadership, management, and supervisory training. Florida Secure funding and then take advantage of some of the exec- utive development programs offered, such as the Kennedy School of Business and others. Georgia Systematic succession planning. Hawaii Improve pay, encourage mentor/protégé links for succession planning, modernize the basic organizational structure to include manageable spans of control (I now have 16 direct reports, 12 of which are senior managers). Provide more opportunities for leadership/management training, including hands-on opportunities to implement basic and advanced principles. Idaho Introduce a formal succession planning and leadership train- ing program with thoughtful attention to department values and leadership characteristics, which are more comprehen- sive than the informal ones currently in place. Kansas Initiate a succession planning program. Kentucky Mandatory leadership training for merit and non-merit man- agers. Increase the mentoring program to extend beyond the advanced leadership academy. Formal assessment for poten- tial leaders. Louisiana Institute a formal mentoring program. Maryland Maryland State Highway Administration could improve on its ability to change pay scales and offer salaries closer to the median salary of transportation professional. Michigan Michigan DOT is part of a pilot program within the state of Michigan to close the gap between values that are important and the evidence of those values in our behaviors. In the pilot, MDOT leadership team will participate in a 360-degree leadership profile. The plan is to have all managers and supervisor participate as subjects, thus, giving line staff the opportunity to participate as direct reports. Missouri Reinitiate an aggressive succession–planning model that focuses on leadership traits and competencies with continued development of executive coaching and skills training. Nebraska Continue to develop and advance/expand the leadership devel- opment program to make it better. Provide additional oppor- tunities for employees to grow. New Hampshire Establish a professional development program focused on organizational management/leadership. Ohio Implement targeted training and mentoring. Regarding reten- tion, Ohio DOT took steps to implement a new category of

44 employee termed Career Professional. Career Professional ser- vice covers some mid- and senior-level positions linking secu- rity to work performance in terms of the department business plan. The business plan is filed formally with the legislature. Oklahoma Compensate competitively with the market, encourage cross training and mentorships, make management training and employee development a priority. Oregon Make management more attractive, provide more training in areas of relationship building/politicking, rectify pay com- pression issues, engage in succession planning activities, identify creative retention strategies, and develop mentoring programs. South Carolina Develop a more comprehensive workforce development plan for the agency. Various components of a plan are being addressed such as: Leadership/management training is being offered to prepare employees for management positions and organization charts are being reviewed to identify positions that will be vacated because of retirement options, which will be exercised during the next 3–5 years. However, it all needs to be pulled together in a systematic approach. Tennessee Launch Executive Workforce Development Program FY2004. Utah Mid-management training and rotation among a variety of jobs. Virginia Purposeful executive development program including job shadowing; special, challenging assignments; and other devel- opmental opportunities. Recruitment—Part II, Question 8 Is there anything specific that your agency is doing to pre- pare women to be appointed to leadership/management positions in you agency? Arizona Succession planning. Arkansas Providing equal opportunities under Question 7. California The department follows the state of California’s civil service objective of equal employment opportunity. Florida We do not have separate leadership development programs for women. However, we do ensure that women are propor- tionally represented in all of our training and development programs. Georgia Identifying and nurturing talent. Hawaii No. Idaho All training programs are open to all employees and we do have an engineer-in-training mentoring program, which men- tors both women and men equally. We have no specific pro- gram for women. Iowa Develop a succession–planning document that identifies strate- gic areas where problems may occur. Kansas Not at this time. Kentucky Support enrollment in Certified Management Program. Sup- port enrollment in Advanced Leadership Academy (ALA). Provide mentoring while in ALA. Open positions; require interviews of women and/or minority applicants. Louisiana No. Maryland Women are encouraged to participate in the agency’s Advanced Leadership Program. Missouri Missouri DOT has a progressive diversity initiative. Nebraska No. Our Leadership Development Program is individualized. All employees are offered the same opportunities, regardless of gender. New Hampshire Ensure that all females filling key positions attend the Senior Leadership Conference. Manage assignments where permissible. Ohio Affirmative Action goals are part of succession planning. Senior leadership and HR are a part of our business plan review (5 of 13 division managers, 38%, are female.) Oklahoma No.

45 Oregon Nothing specific. South Carolina Providing women’s forums bi-annually, which address issues that are identified by a random sample survey of women employed at South Carolina DOT. A pool of potential future leaders is being developed and women in the agency are par- ticipating in the training and development opportunities that are available to all employees in the agency. Three specific leadership development programs are available: the Engineer Development Program, Strategic Training and Education for the 21st Century (STEP-21), and Strategic Training for Trans- portation Agency Representatives (STTAR). All three pro- grams have women from different levels within the organi- zation who participate each year. Virginia No. Training—Part III, Question 11 What could be done to improve the quality of the leader- ship training that your employees receive in your agency? Alaska More classes offered. Arizona Design a validation system to measure use of skills on the job. Florida Funding for senior leaders to attend executive development programs. Georgia Add another level between middle management and senior management. Hawaii Give priority to participants with a positive attitude for learn- ing and aspirations to higher position. Illinois Obtain new teachers. Iowa More management support. Kansas See that leadership development is a high priority activity and establish accountability for making it happen. Missouri Management selection process should be revised. Nebraska The workload of the employees. Ohio Provide for DEUs, CLEs, C.P.D. South Carolina Senior managers and mid-managers do a better job of mod- eling the leadership characteristics that are taught in leader- ship programs. Tennessee We are developing Long-Range Work Force Develop- ment Plan. Virginia Add more rotational and developmental programs for non-engineers. Training—Part III, Question 16 Is there anything else about your agency’s leadership training program that would be of interest to this study or which would be valuable to share with other state DOTs? Arizona WASHTO completed a similar survey on leadership training in 2003 and will share results. Florida We currently conduct the Supervisor’s Academy, the Leader- ship Academy, and the Graduate Leadership Academy. All are connected and designed to be progressive. While cover- ing successively higher degrees of leadership development, each reviews the critical soft skills required of all supervisors. Illinois (A) Illinois DOT has obtained certified status with the Inter- national Association for Continuing Education and Training (IACET). With this certification, the department is allowed to issue continuing education credits for approved courses. (B) In addition, the department has recently opened its own training center with wireless access for training for information pro- cessing and leadership management courses. (C) Partnership with the Interagency Training Council to provide DOT train- ing to other state agencies. (D) Partnership with Illinois Association of County Engineers to provide leadership train- ing to county engineers. (E) Partnership with various con- sultants groups to conduct leadership and technical training. Kansas All new supervisors are required to attend our 40-hour Basic Effective Supervisory Training Program. Nonsupervisors who have the title of “lead worker” are required to attend our 18-hour Leadership Basics Training Program. However, all

46 employees are encouraged to attend this program to help them begin or to continue developing their leadership skills. In addition, we offer modules from Achieve Global’s “Lead- ership for Results” program for all employees to attend. New Hampshire Leadership training has to start at the top to create a structure that supports and fosters leadership tenets. Ohio Tuition reimbursement is provided for bargaining unit and exempt level positions. Courses may be taken in degree earn- ing programs in Ohio DOT-related fields leading to advance- ment in leadership positions within the agency. In addition, the state of Ohio offers a program to certify employees as “Certi- fied Public Managers” in which ODOT employees participate. Periodic training need assessments of job classifications within the departments are conduced to determine internal and exter- nal training programs to be developed, promoted, prioritized, and offered. Annually, ODOT employee training plans are developed. Oklahoma The department holds a two-day annual leadership develop- ment conference for managers and supervisors. South Carolina Yes, we have core courses on leadership development, as well as three special programs to prepare employees for cur- rent and future leadership positions. They are (1) STTAR— Strategic Training for Transportation Agency Representa- tives, (2) STEP-21—Strategic Training and Education for the 21st Century, and (3) EDP—Engineer Development Program. Tennessee In support of one of Tennessee DOT’s Strategic Objectives of “Building organizational diversity and capacity,” our transition from Human Resources Training to TDOT Workforce Devel- opment Office was greatly needed. This transition has enabled us to provide our organization and individuals with the knowl- edge, skills, attitudes, and competencies necessary for creating opportunities to achieve desired and required individual, orga- nizational, and internal and external customer expectations. Viewing development of human capital as a value-add process from a “Whole Person” perspective to include technical, inter- personal, and leadership attributes development will assist in the move towards achieving the business goals of TDOT. Succession Management—Part IV, Question 9 Is there anything else about your agency’s Succession Management program that would be of interest in this study and to other state DOTs? Florida In the past we have “raised our own” through the organization. Now we are being encouraged and often strongly directed to seek outside managers to fill top-level positions. This does not provide a strong incentive for a succession management program. Illinois Improved job rotation, cross training, and mentoring of lower- level talent pools. Maryland Currently developing a succession planning model based loosely on Byham, Smith and Paese’s model of succession management Missouri In the event of death or disability, we have a succession plan to ensure immediate replacement. Tennessee Validation of executive leadership competencies before developing any learning activities will preclude “Quick Hit” mode of trying to rapidly implement an Executive Workforce Development Program that may prove to be ineffective. Virginia Scholarship program and engineer development program. Succession Management—Part IV, Question 10 What could be done to improve the preparation of your employees for higher positions in management in your agency? Alaska More training courses; perhaps a job mentoring or shadow- ing program. Arizona Match competence to skill. List positions that would come open in 5–10 years. Arkansas Effective succession management program and adequate funding. Florida Identify leadership performance gaps early and use individ- ual development counseling/coaching and training to elimi- nate these performance gaps. Georgia Develop a systematic program beginning with something like 7 Habits, through several defined developmental stages that build on these concepts and add others, such as strategic management, and move to more purely leadership models and behaviors coupled with the specific leadership chal- lenges of our organization. Hawaii Formal succession program with bargaining unit agreements.

47 Iowa Leadership training, mentoring, rotational program. Kansas Initiate a Success Planning Program and a Leadership Devel- opment Program designed to prepare employees for higher positions in management. These options are currently under review. Missouri (1) Provide a better understanding of the political dynamics involved in working within state transportation leadership. (2) Provide a better understanding of the leadership role ver- sus the technical aspects of transportation work. Nebraska We enhance our program when we see the need or opportu- nity to do so. A formal rotation assignment program might be beneficial. Ohio More formal mentoring program, identification of critical expe- rience, better promotion of the tuition reimbursement program. Oklahoma Establish and implement a management training and devel- opment curriculum. Cross train supervisors for a broader knowledge and understanding of the department. Develop a mentoring program. Oregon Having a formal succession planning program. Tennessee Extensive PR and marketing of leadership opportunities within the organization will create a need for individuals to actively participate in developing an “Individual Development Plan.” Virginia Multi-faceted developmental opportunities and better identi- fication of bench strength vs. need to “buy” strength. Succession Management—Part IV, Question 11 Does your agency do anything else not previously men- tioned in this questionnaire that would be of interest for the synthesis on developing leaders in state DOTs? Arizona Our maintenance leadership program is a separate program for development of maintenance supervisors and superintendents. Hawaii A senior manager shadow program for mid-level managers; subsidize employees’ independent efforts to acquire leader- ship and management skills; i.e., college courses, AASHTO workshops, ASCE seminars, etc. Missouri Many Missouri DOT leadership positions require profes- sional technical certification (e.g., Professional Engineer cer- tification) to hold the position, even though some of these positions do not perform technical functions. This restricts MoDOT’s applicant pool for many leadership positions. Tennessee Our Graduate Transportation Assistants (GTAs) program recruits civil engineering graduates from the state and regional universities to provide them with their first real experience in their profession. We provide the GTAs a structured on-the- job-training experience for 12 consecutive months, through formal classes and through hands-on developmental activi- ties in the various functions of Tennessee DOT. The GTAs are moved throughout the state to specific functions within the four regions to give them the “Big Picture” of trans- portation systems design, development, and maintenance in diverse geographic environments. Utah We have a new program that is being announced called the Career Rotation Program. It is a formal method of mov- ing mid-level engineering managers to other assignments to expand their knowledge and understanding of the organization.

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TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 349: Developing Transportation Agency Leaders examines practices and innovative approaches that address the development of transportation leadership in today’s work environment. The report covers demographics, recruitment and retention, leadership training, and succession management.

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