National Academies Press: OpenBook

Developing Transportation Agency Leaders (2005)

Chapter: Appendix D - Leadership Development Programs

« Previous: Appendix C - Narrative Responses
Page 48
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Leadership Development Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 48
Page 49
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Leadership Development Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 49
Page 50
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Leadership Development Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 50
Page 51
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - Leadership Development Programs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Developing Transportation Agency Leaders. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23300.
×
Page 51

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

48 APPENDIX D Leadership Development Programs NEW JERSEY DIVISION OFFICE, FHWA LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM The following outlines how the New Jersey Division Office of the FHWA advanced leadership development within its organization. Why We Initiated the Program As part of the division’s corporate management strategies, we created a voluntary “Leadership Development Program.” The purpose of the program is to assist the staff in develop- ing their leadership skills and to provide opportunities at the local and national levels to exercise their leadership talents. Under the corporate management strategies, we have an obligation to develop the leadership skills of our staff. It became apparent to us when developing the program that we did not need to send people off-site for high-priced training. In fact, we believed that an office-based program would pro- vide for better interaction and a greater potential group for the program. How We Initiated It We sent an e-mail message to the entire staff announcing the program and discussed it at an all-employees meeting. The notice made it clear that the program was voluntary, but that it would involve a commitment of time and a willingness to develop the needed skills. We treated it as we would any other on-the-job training. In other words, we did not expect the volunteers to do the work on their own time, but to fit it into their daily schedule. Key Components of the Program The program is loosely fashioned after the old U.S.DOT Fel- lows Program. • Self-Assessment—Each volunteer was asked to com- plete a self-assessment instrument to assess his or her current skill in 20+ leadership attributes. The ADA and I also completed the same instrument for each volun- teer. After the instrument was completed, the three of us got together to discuss strengths and opportunities for improvement. • Leadership Project—As part of the feedback discus- sion on the self-assessment, each volunteer was asked to identify a leadership project. The project had to be one that expanded their skills beyond our office. • Monthly Meetings and Book Discussions—We meet each month to discuss various leadership concepts. Spe- cific activities include: – Leadership book reviews: We selected 10 books from a long list of available reading material to focus our discussions. Each month we read a few chapters from the book and as a team discuss how it applies to our office and each of us. – DA/ADA discusses leadership and management con- cepts learned at various leadership forums, work- shops, etc. We use case studies to generate discus- sion and participation. – Participants discuss the status of their leadership proj- ects and invite discussions. – A different leader moderates each monthly meeting. At the end of each meeting, participants evaluate the meeting and offer recommendations. – We plan to acquire and discuss videos on vision, strate- gic planning, power of words, etc., to add variation. – Our leadership group has recently recommended Myers–Briggs Type Indicator personality inventory for the entire office to facilitate better understanding of each other. Results/Activities We had nine volunteers in the original program when we started in December 2000. Two members have received pro- motions since then, but we added seven new people. Our group now comprises 14 leaders (out of 27 in the office). We have identified changes needed in a number of areas, including: 1. How we recognize our partners at NJDOT. We created a Dave Powell Excellence Award to recognize indi- viduals that have successfully worked with FHWA to make New Jersey a better place to live and work. 2. We refined the Division “outstanding” award process as a result of our last self-assessment, which was man- aged by one of our leaders as part of his leadership project. 3. How we interview candidates for positions in the Divi- sion. We have identified a number of critical traits that candidates need to fit into our office culture. 4. How we look at training. A number of our leaders have identified the “Transportation Virtual University”—a U.S.DOT web-based training package—as a very viable way to obtain training in leadership without leaving the office. As a result of this heightened interest in web- based training, we have provided a workstation in our

49 office library to ensure uninterrupted training time for the leader. To improve the quality of our training program and to give it more focus, the ADA now meets with every staff member annually to discuss and ensure the Divi- sion training program is meeting employees’ needs and is aligned with the agency objectives. 5. Our leadership group recently participated in a 360- degree feedback survey administered by the USDA. The participants considered this effort very informa- tive and useful. Leadership training is one of our highest priorities. Absent skilled leaders, FHWA will not be capable of leading the transportation community into this new millennium. Ours is but one of many approaches that can be taken. We encourage everyone to develop a leadership program for his or her staff. LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AND OPPORTUNITIES—MARYLAND STATE HIGHWAY ADMINISTRATION, NOVEMBER 10, 2004 The following details the leadership development programs in the Maryland State Highway Administration (MSHA): MSHA has two formal Leadership Development Programs: • Advanced Leadership Program (ALP) • Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) MSHA provides many other opportunities for employees to develop the leadership skills necessary for advancement in the agency: • Mentoring Program • New Supervisor Training Program • Rotational Program • Personal Development Plan In addition, technical training opportunities that incorporate leadership development skills are available to meet individ- ual needs: • Advanced Education Program • Graduate Engineers’ Training Program • Project Management Training Program • Engineering Technician Development Program • Morgan State University Scholarship Program The following provides a brief overview of each program. Advanced Leadership Program Overview The ALP started as the Management Development Program more than 15 years ago and to date there are more than 125 graduates. In this 2-year leadership development program, MSHA managers are competitively selected and then pro- vided with the opportunity to develop and enhance their lead- ership skills. The purpose of the program is to provide man- agers with the tools necessary to further enhance both their personal and professional development. MSHA benefits from this program by having leaders who will be better pre- pared to fill positions of increased responsibility and chal- lenge and by having managers who will be ready to take on succession planning. The individual manager benefits from the 2-year program in many different ways, which include, but are not limited to, the following activities and/or experiences: participating in the University of Maryland’s Center for Creative Leadership Program, which provides managers with an honest and can- did appraisal of one’s leadership style and behaviors; devel- oping and implementing an Individual Development Plan with guidance from MSHA’s administrator; participating in teambuilding and leadership retreats, which provide man- agers with opportunities to hone their individual leadership and work group skills; participating in and/or leading monthly class meetings based on specific topics related to leadership development and learning the value of working together as a group; participating as a class in a highly visible class proj- ect sponsored by a senior manager; participating as a class in a community project; participating in a mentoring relation- ship with a senior level manager; exposure to working with all levels of MSHA to gain a broader understanding of the organization and engaging in various leadership training and developmental activities. As a member of the ALP, individuals are expected to complete all of the requirements of the program and to con- tinue to maintain a high degree of motivation, initiative, and commitment—many of the same qualities and characteris- tics needed to be an excellent leader at MSHA. Approximately 50% of the Senior Management Team of 29 completed MSHA’s MDP/ALP program. Leadership Education and Development Program Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) is a leader- ship development program for managers and team leaders designed to enhance and hone an individual’s management and leadership skills. LEAD is open to any manager, super- visor, or team leader who wants to further enhance his or her personal and professional development. The program is comprised of a 360-degree feedback assess- ment, which enhances one’s self-awareness of both strengths and weaknesses, and a specific curriculum that includes the following courses: Essentials of Leadership, Managing for Results, Basic Personnel Management, Meeting Boot Camp, Budget/Fiscal Management, Effective Presentation Skills, Coaching for Commitment, and a Leadership Wrap-Up Mod- ule, to assess how well the individual manager has been able

50 to apply the skills and behaviors in his or her day-to-day per- sonal and professional life. The curriculum also includes sev- eral electives to choose from, including Conflict Management, Effective Communication, Managing Multiple Priorities, Managing Change, and Professionalism. Participants have 2 years to complete the entire curriculum; once completed, the participant is presented with a LEAD certificate. Mentors Program MSHA’s Mentors Program is vital to the success of a diverse work environment. The program consists of two compo- nents: a Mentor/Mentee Program and a Peer-to-Peer Mentor Program. The program also works to • Provide role models, • Help build networking and relationship building skills, • Improve understanding of the organizational culture of MSHA, • Encourage and foster development opportunities and growth, • Help the employee in his/her career development goals, and • Improve organizational effectiveness. The Mentor/Mentee Program is a formal one-on-one part- nership between an experienced senior or mid-level person (mentor) and a less experienced person (mentee) intended to help foster the career development and professional growth of the mentee. The partnership is a sharing of knowledge, experience, skills, and organizational insight. The Peer-to-Peer Program matches a current employee with a newly hired employee on a short-term basis to help the new employee become familiar with MSHA’s culture, peo- ple, facilities and activities. The purpose is to foster and value new working relationships, assist in understanding the various opportunities within the culture of MSHA, and pro- mote a sense of inclusion. New Supervisor Training The Maryland Department of Transportation implemented a department-wide Supervisor Certification Program 3 years ago. All new supervisors are required to participate in a super- visor and management curriculum within 6 months of being assigned supervisory responsibilities. Rotational Opportunities Rotational opportunities are encouraged for employees who would like to learn a different operational aspect of MSHA or new skills. At the same time the employee provides tem- porary assistance to meet the particular needs of the host office. Rotational assignments are often a tool for accom- plishing organization and/or performance improvements and an excellent opportunity for exposure to different leadership styles. Most rotational opportunities originate with a solici- tation from an office in need of assistance. The process is similar to MSHA’s hiring process. Applications are submit- ted, applicants are interviewed, and a selection is made from among the applicants. Rotational opportunities may last up to 1 year. Personal Development Plan All MSHA employees complete an annual Personal Develop- ment Plan, usually in conjunction with a periodic performance evaluation. The Personal Development Plan is designed to encourage each employee to set both career and personal development goals, identify the resources needed to reach those goals, and set realistic time frames for completion of his/her objectives. Managers provide input and coach and mentor the employee for success. Graduate Engineering Training Program The Graduate Engineering Training Program was developed to provide new engineers with the highest level of technical and managerial enhancement available in the civil engineer- ing field. Both aspects of the program, rotation and modules, are top-notch opportunities for the technical and managerial developments of MSHA’s engineers. They open doors and provide diversity of experience. Advanced Education Program This program assists MSHA employees with their pursuit of higher education, which may include various certifications and degrees. It is an educational opportunity offered to employees to help satisfy their career objectives. Project Management Training Program Project management training was developed for MSHA con- sultant personnel who are either currently managing projects or will be given project management responsibility. The train- ing is delivered by the University of Maryland College Park, Clark School of Engineering, as well as MSHA and consul- tant staff. Engineering Technician Development Program The Engineering Technician Development Program was developed to provide MSHA employees in the technical series at the Transportation Engineer Technician III, IV, and V lev- els with the opportunity to improve job performance. The par- ticipants in the program complete an extensive curriculum involving five college-level courses in addition to a series of

51 in-house core courses focusing on developing and enhancing management, communication, and technical skills. Morgan State University Scholarship Program This 2-year program provides engineering technicians who have already completed their Associates Degree the opportu- nity, upon selection, to pursue a Bachelor of Science degree in Civil Engineering. The scholarship includes tuition and regular salary for employees to attend school full time. Continuing Efforts MSHA sets goals for a diversified workplace where all employ- ees are provided with opportunities for development of the leadership skills that are necessary for job performance and job advancement. To date, MSHA has met its goal in the hir- ing and retaining of women engineers. MSHA’s Deputy Administrator for Finance, Administration, and Information Technology is a woman and the first African-American to hold a deputy position at the agency. Six members of MSHA’s senior management team are women, three of whom have joined the team within the past three years. This is an evolu- tionary process. ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION The following details the leadership development model in effect at the Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) while the author was the Deputy Director/Chief Operating Officer of the agency in the mid-1990s. ADOT was faced with many challenges in the early 1990s. Major program and leadership changes left the agency in need of a strong commitment to its current and future lead- ers to ensure its future success. In 1993, the new Executive Director and the deputy directors decided that a comprehen- sive leadership program was needed to cultivate and train individuals who were currently filling positions of responsi- bility and leadership at ADOT. The foundation of the program was found in three popu- lar texts of that era: Leadership Is an Art by Max DePree, The American Samurai by Bill Lareau, and Stephen R. Covey’s The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. It was felt that the concepts presented in these three books reflected the direc- tors’ leadership philosophy and that the books represented a sound foundation of learning for all of ADOT’s leaders. With this in mind, each participant in the ADOT leadership devel- opment program was required to read all three before attend- ing training. Training was offered to each of the divisions, largely as a unit. At that time, the 4,500 employees were divided into five divisions: Administration, Highways, Transportation Plan- ning, Aeronautics, and Motor Vehicles. Each division was taken individually, with leaders gathered in groups of 20 to 40 for the training. It was felt that keeping the division groups together would facilitate further team building expe- riences as well as advance the desired leadership training objectives. Training occurred off-site over the course of 2 days. Most of the curriculum was taught by the directors, with some ele- ments presented by the division director or another key leader of that unit. Course work was taken from the materials found in the three books; it offered an opportunity for participants to explore and further develop their understanding of the princi- ples presented in those works. The training was highly inter- active and participatory for all involved. Those selected for the initial phase of the training were from the division directors and their immediate subordinates. Subsequent phases included other leaders within the five divisions, until a large number of leaders throughout the agency had been trained. It was a high impact experience for this leadership team to spend concentrated time together with the three top lead- ers of the agency addressing key topics and concepts that would further ADOT in its transportation objectives for the state. Outcomes were tangible and gratifying. Leaders devel- oped sound skills. They recognized a leadership culture that was reflective of Max DePree’s style of management articu- lated in his book, where leaders bear the pain and not inflict it. Bill Lareau’s descriptions of undesirable traits in corpo- rate America were the genesis for many subtle but significant changes in how ADOT operated and in how the hierarchy was broken down. Covey’s seven habits became a common thread in communications and leadership efforts. This program, borne out of necessity, became a powerful tool for advancing a culture of leadership that had been unknown at ADOT until that time. In the end, many leaders emerged from those training sessions and this program bet- ter equipped to lead in the 21st century.

Next: Abbreviations used without definitions in TRB publications »
Developing Transportation Agency Leaders Get This Book
×
 Developing Transportation Agency Leaders
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

TRB’s National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP) Synthesis 349: Developing Transportation Agency Leaders examines practices and innovative approaches that address the development of transportation leadership in today’s work environment. The report covers demographics, recruitment and retention, leadership training, and succession management.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!