National Academies Press: OpenBook

Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles (2005)

Chapter: Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter Six - Examples of Emergency Response Procedures." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2005. Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23328.
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Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

16 This chapter features several examples of emergency response procedures used by various transit agencies. To convey the format and graphical content of the procedures, scanned images are used. Because the original documents contained color and photographs, the scanned quality may not fully reflect the quality of the original. In reproducing the emergency response procedures, the following guidelines were followed: • Only material relevant to the use of natural gas was reproduced. Many notebooks of procedures contained CHAPTER SIX EXAMPLES OF EMERGENCY RESPONSE PROCEDURES information on other types of equipment, such as con- ventional diesel buses or light rail, and on other topics, such as routine maintenance, traffic accident response, or non-fuel-related emergencies. Such material is not reproduced here. • In some cases, similar material was furnished for sev- eral fleets of buses. In those cases, only one fleet has been selected. • All material reproduced has been “sanitized” by remov- ing names and phone numbers specific to the operation, which in many cases were contact names, home tele- phone numbers, or similar information intended for use only by emergency responders. TRANSIT AGENCY 1—COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS AND LIQUEFIED COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS FIELD SERVICE GUIDE FOR FIRST RESPONDERS Preface It is the intention of ______ to furnish all emergency first response entities within the agency’s operating area with training and information resources pertaining to emergency procedures when dealing with natural gas engine fuel. ______currently deploys alternative fuel powered vehicles that use unodorized liquefied compressed natural gas (LCNG) as engine fuel. Prior to using LNG as its fuel supply, ______ used pipe-transported natural gas to fuel its vehicles. The gas is compressed to a high pressure (~4000 PSI) and dispensed to vehicles and stored as a high- pressure gas. Today, LNG is stored on ______ properties processed so that it has completely vaporized prior to reaching the main storage vessels. Like CNG, vaporized LNG is compressed to a high pressure and dispensed to vehicles as a high-pressure gas. ______ has coined the term “liquefied compressed natural gas (LCNG).” An important point to remember is that pure uncompressed (= atmospheric pressure) natural gas is lighter than air and is unodorized. The CNG Field Service Guide for First Responders is meant to be a guideline to familiarize first response per- sonnel with the equipment and conditions ______ deploys and experiences. This document is not intended to replace formal training and education related to compressed natural gas, liquefied natural gas, or liquefied com- pressed natural gas properties, equipment and facilities, emergencies, or the Incident Command System (ICS). This document does not provide a comprehensive or exhaustive list of all responsibilities assigned to any first responders, nor does it take the place of locally established guidelines for emergency management. ______, Director of Maintenance

17 Emergency Phone Numbers Sunday 3:00 AM–11:30 PM Vehicle Dispatch East Vehicle Dispatch West Monday–Friday 24 Hours Saturday and Sunday 4:30 AM–1:00 AM Monday–Sunday 4:30 AM–1:00 AM Vehicle Maintenance East Vehicle Maintenance West Vehicle Manufacturers New Flyer Industries Orion Bus Industries Neoplan USA Corporation Hazard Assessment Introduction Transit vehicles that are powered by natural gas fuel are subject to hazards similar to all other types of transit vehicles. For instance, traffic collisions, system malfunctions, and other undesirable condi- tions are experienced by all transit vehicles including those powered by natural gas fuels. Vehicles powered by natural gas fuel, specifically those [where] the gas is stored on the vehicle under high pressure, possess unique dangers if an undesirable condition or conditions exist. Dangers include unscheduled release of gas to the atmosphere, sudden release (explosion) of high-pressure gas to the atmosphere, freezing of the skin or eyes, and asphyxiation. Each brand and each model and model year of those brands of transit vehicles that are powered by natural gas fuel have unique con- figurations, but safety procedures when responding to incidences involving the unique dangers asso- ciated with vehicles powered by natural gas fuel are standard.

1. Master Rotary Control Switch Effect: Stops engine Rotate the switch counterclockwise to off position. The engine should shut down, interior and exte- rior lighting should shut off, and all other electrically operated equipment should cease to operate. The switch is located in the driver’s cab, on the left switch panel, next to the driver’s seat. 2. Engine Compartment Control Switch Effect: Stops engine Toggle the rear engine control switch to the off position. The off position is the center toggled posi- tion. The rear engine control switch is located in the engine compartment and can be accessed when the rear engine compartment door is open. 3. Manual Fuel Shut-Off Valve Effect: Stops fuel flow to the engine Rotate the handle 1/4 turn. This stops fuel flow from the storage cylinders to the engine. The engine will not immediately shut off. Despite closing the valve, treat all fuel lines as filled with high- pressure gas. 4. Battery Disconnect Switch Effect: De-energizes battery power to the vehicle Move the battery disconnect switch to the “OFF” position. The engine will shut down and wires and devices after the disconnect switch will be de-energized. The fuel solenoid valves will be closed, but treat fuel lines as filled with high-pressure gas. 18 Standard Guidelines • Use extreme caution. Be aware of sights and sounds. Identify any confined spaces near the incident, and ventilate as necessary. • Eliminate ALL possible sources of ignition. No smoking or road flares near the incident. Check for downed utility wires. • Establish a controlled area with a radius of no less than 50 feet. • Include in all preliminary investigations information gathering from all involved employees. Utilize Field and Maintenance Supervisors as liaisons. • Be aware that natural gas displaces oxygen and may cause asphyxiation. • ______ utilizes natural gas fuel that is unodorized. Use proper equipment/instruments to determine concentration of gas. • Both slow leaks and sudden gas releases can cause frosting. Do not touch frosted areas or components. • Engine compartment fires will cause the release of fire suppressant at a very high rate. Use caution when dowsing fires in the engine compartment. • Identify the vehicle model and model year. Vehicles can be identified by unit number. Use the guides within this document to assist in the identification of the vehicle type. • If there is no apparent hazard, request ______ transit personnel to determine if the vehicle is safe to operate. • If a leak is accompanied by fire or explosion, the lead fire agency must activate appropriate resources. Mechanical Device Operating Procedures

5. Pressure Relief Device Vent Outlets and Effect: Allows “normal” depressurization Pressure Relief Devices of fuel storage cylinders The pressure relief devices (PRD) allow the AUTOMATIC “unscheduled” release of gas due to exces- sive heat. The PRDs are SAFETY devices and are there to prevent a sudden explosion associated with the fuel storage cylinders. DO NOT attempt to block the PRDs or PRD vents from discharging gas. 6. Fire Suppression System Manual Actuator Effect: Extinguishes or assists in extinguishing fires in the engine compartment Located in the driver compartment next to the driver seat. Remove the retaining pin and depress the red FIRE button. The fire suppression system will discharge the dry chemical agent (PKP) in the engine compartment only. 19 Access keys may be needed to open certain compartment doors.

20 1996 Orion Bus Industries Specifications Battery Disconnect Switch Left Side Of Bus

21 Left and Right Sides Of Bus PRD Vent Outlets Fire Suppression Manual Actuator PRD Vent Outlets

22 TRANSIT AGENCY 2—MASS TRANSIT VEHICLE EMERGENCY RESPONSE GUIDE

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27 TRANSIT AGENCY 3—PROCEDURES AND INSPECTION MANUAL FOR COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS PROGRAM AND FACILITY CNG FUEL LEAK PROCEDURE FOR BUS OPERATORS In the event of a CNG fuel leak while you are driving the bus you should follow these procedures: • Pull the bus over as soon as possible in a safe and open location. • Secure the vehicle by putting the bus in neutral, setting the parking brake, and shutting the engine off. • Instruct the passengers to get off the bus and guide them to a safe location (100 yards if possible) up-wind of the bus. • Contact the dispatch office as soon as possible via a land line and provide your exact location so we may respond to the scene promptly. • Each CNG bus is equipped with a fire suppression system that will automatically activate in the event of extreme heat or fire. It is of utmost importance that you remain calm and follow the proper procedures, because the passengers will be looking to you for guidance in this situation. Updated—April 5, 2000

28 PROCEDURES FOR RESPONSE TO FIRE ALARM ACTIVATION FOR OPERATIONS, MAINTENANCE AND SECURITY PERSONNEL I. Description of Alarm System A. The fire alarms in the _____ Facility are designed to be activated by heat, smoke, manual pull station, water flow in sprinkler piping, or a release of natural gas in the fueling station. B. The three fire alarm panels in the Facility are divided into zones which identify the location of the alarm origin. Each panel has a zone labeled Gas Alarm Panel, which will illuminate when a concentration of natural gas accumulates in the new fueling station which is 40% of the Lower Explosive Level (LEL) of a natural gas and air mixture. C. In the event of a fire alarm activation within this Facility, the majority of occupants are required to exit the building in adherence to ______ Emergency Evacuation Plan. Part of this plan, however, requires the dispatcher and key maintenance or security personnel to remain and investigate the cause of the alarm unless doing so obviously exposes them to a hazardous situation. II. Outside Monitoring of ______ RTA Fire Alarm A. A fire alarm activation in this Facility does not automatically ring into the City Fire Depart- ment. It does, however, ring into ______ Security Service who will call the ______ Dis- patcher’s Office and allow up to 5 minutes for an inspection to be performed of the Facility to determine if an emergency situation exists or if a false alarm has occurred. B. ______ Security will send the ______ City Fire Department to our Facility if any of the fol- lowing occur: 1. ______ RTA dispatcher informs ______ that fire or smoke is present in the Facility. 2. ______ RTA dispatcher informs ______ that the doors and exhaust fans are not cycling properly to exhaust the fueling station in the event of a natural gas release. 3. ______ RTA dispatcher fails to communicate the findings of Facility inspection to within 5 minutes. 4. ______Security is unable to contact RTA. III. Response by Key Maintenance and/or Weekend Security Personnel to Fire Alarm Activa- tion (Security Personnel are present in the Facility from Friday 5:00 pm through Monday 4:00 am) A. Maintenance and/or security personnel are to establish communications with dispatcher using one of the following: 1. Obtain portable radio from Maintenance or Dispatch Office. Use Channel 2/Channel 3 as backup. 2. Call Dispatch Office using ______ RTA phone system or cellular phone. Call ext. ______ or use ext. ______ as backup. Note: Portable radio or cellular phones are preferable since communications with dispatcher can be maintained while Facility inspection is performed. 3. In the event of a natural gas release in the fueling station, the dispatcher can be con- tacted using the dedicated “Direct Line to Dispatch” phone located just outside main door to fueling station. Two additional “Direct Line to Dispatch” phones are available for use in the bus storage area, one at the front of row 7 and the other at the back of row 19. These phones will automatically ring in on ext. ______ in the Dispatch Office when the handset is lifted. B. Maintenance and/or security personnel need to identify location or zone indicated on alarm panels where alarm originated so they know where to inspect. 1. Dispatcher can identify location by phone or radio or any one of the three alarm panels can be viewed directly. 2. To ensure employee evacuation, do not silence alarms until after building has been inspected and no trouble found. C. Maintenance and/or security personnel are now to inspect the portion of the building where the alarm originated. 1. Inspect for fire and smoke. 2. If the alarm activation was caused by a natural gas release, inspect the fueling station for proper door and fan cycling and make sure that the source of the release has been valved off or removed from the Facility.

29 D. Report findings of inspection to dispatcher: 1. Remember that this inspection and communication with dispatcher must be performed in under 5 minutes from time of alarm activation or the ______ City Fire Department will be sent. IV. Response by Dispatcher to Fire Alarm Activation A. Terminate non-emergency phone calls from ext. ______, ______, and ______. B. Receive incoming call from ______ Security Service. 1. ______ will call on ext. ______ or ______. 2. ______ will remain on the phone for up to 5 minutes while cause of alarm is investigated. C. Receive incoming call from maintenance and/or security personnel using Channels 2 or 3 of radio system or ext. ______ or ______ of phone system. 1. Weekday second and third shift supervisors carry a cellular phone. Phone: ______. 2. Weekend security service carries a portable radio. D. At no time is the dispatcher to leave the Dispatch Office in order to inspect any part of the Facility for fire, smoke, or a natural gas release. E. Report findings of building inspection performed by key maintenance and/or security per- sonnel to ______Security Service. 1. If fire, smoke, or other hazardous situation is found, then identify situation and location in Facility to______ Security and request them to send ______City Fire Department then terminate call. 2. Call 911 (9911 on our system) before evacuating building. 3. If no hazardous situation [is] found, inform ______ Security that a false alarm has occurred and terminate call. V. Dispatcher or Maintenance Employee Can Silence Alarms and Reset System A. Alarm can be reset by using key labeled “Fire Alarm Control Key” hanging next to fire alarm panel in Dispatch Office. Use key in key switch labeled “Alarm Reset.” Additional key set is in Dispatch Office key box. B. After alarm is reset, announce over outside PA system that alarm activation was a false alarm and that employees may reenter the building. C. If fire alarm system will not reset and goes back into alarm, ______ Security Service will call back and maintenance and/or security personnel will perform a more thorough inspec- tion; i.e., inspect manual pull stations for having been tripped. D. If still no apparent reason for continued alarm activation, attempt to reset again this time with ______ Security Service remaining on the phone. E. If fire alarm system still will not reset: 1. Inform ______ Security of the problem. 1-800-______. 2. Silence the alarms by pushing the black button labeled “Alarm Silence” on Dispatch Office fire alarm panel. 3. Inform Facilities Maintenance of the problem. ______ Work ______ Home ______ Cellular ______ Home ______ Cellular ______ Home ______ Home ______ Home Automatic Sequence of Operations In the event of a natural gas leak, the natural gas detectors will operate the ventilation fans auto- matically. Upon detection of natural gas at a level of approximately 1% of the air in the zone [10% of the Lower Explosive Limit (LEL) for a mixture of a natural gas and air], the exhaust air fan(s) for the zone will be engaged by the controls and the gas heaters in the zone will be shut off. The fans are

30 designed to rapidly reduce the concentration of gas in each zone in the building. Operation of the fans is indicated by a yellow status light on the main panel in the Maintenance Office and by a similar status light on the dispatcher’s panel. In normal operation, the natural gas ventilation system will operate the zone fan(s) to reduce gas con- centration below 1% of the air in the zone and then shut down the fan. However, because of fluctu- ations in the mixture of natural gas and air in a zone, concentrations of natural gas may reach 2% of the air in the zone (20% LEL). Should this level of gas/air mixture be reached, the odor of natural gas would be heavy and noticeable in the area of release. In this event, an alarm condition will be indi- cated by a red status light on the main panel in the Maintenance Office and by a similar status light on the dispatcher’s panel. In addition, the audible alarm in the zone will operate. Zones 6, 8, 12, 13, and 14 (Running Repair; Body Shop; Air Conditioning Repair Bays; Preventative Maintenance Bays; and Steam, Tire, and Dynamometer Rooms) are the zones in which major main- tenance activities occur. Each of these zones is equipped with a manual switch which allows the zone exhaust fans to be manually operated for a limited period of time in the event that maintenance per- sonnel working in the area detect natural gas by sense of smell. Alarm Response In the event of an alarm (20% LEL): 1. Clear the building until the condition has been corrected. 2. Report the cause of the gas release (if known) to the supervisor in charge in the Maintenance Office. 3. Leave the bus in the area where it is located. The Natural Gas Ventilation System will ventilate the zone and shut down the gas heaters until the gas has been ventilated from the zone as described in “Automatic Sequence of Operations” above. The supervisor will direct maintenance personnel to react to the gas detection with one or more of the following responses: 1. Activate additional ventilation if needed. 2. Identify the source of the gas release. 3. Shut down the source of the gas release. 4. Drive the bus with the gas release out of the building. 5. Evacuate the building. 6. Call the ______ City Fire Department. 7. Block access to vehicles entering the garage. 8. Document the quality of the vehicle for repair by Engine Shop. ALARM SEQUENCE FOR COMBUSTIBLE GAS DETECTION IN NATURAL GAS FUELING STATION Detection can occur at any one of six sensors; four sensors are located in the fueling bays and two are in the compressor room. • 10% Lower Explosive Level (LEL) Detection of Natural Gas The following responses occur automatically: ✓ Shutdown of natural gas compressors, fuel dispensers, and all fueling system gas valves. ✓ Startup of exhaust fans 3–10 (small displacement fans). ✓ Opening of outside overhead doors. ✓ Activation of yellow warning lights adjacent to inside overhead doors. Inside overhead doors will close approximately 20 seconds later. ✓ Activation of yellow warning light and bell sound at fueling bays and in Operations Department. ✓ Opening of small and large louvers on north and east walls of compressor room.

31 • 20% LEL Detection In addition to the above, the following responses occur automatically: ✓ Startup of exhaust fans 11–14 (large displacement fans). ✓ Previously activated yellow warning light and bell sound at fueling bays and in Operations Department upgrade to red alarm light and horn sound. ✓ Activation of horn on Mine Safety Appliance (MSA) Combustible Gas Monitoring Panel located in the Maintenance Office. • 40% LEL Detection ✓ In addition to all of the above, the building fire alarm will be activated. RESET PROCEDURE FOR NATURAL GAS FUELING STATION This procedure is to be performed only after stopping the release of natural gas inside the facility. 1. Determine remaining concentration of gas in fueling station by viewing display on monitoring panel in Maintenance Office. 2. If at any time the concentration of gas exceeded 20% LEL, then horn on front of monitoring panel will be sounding. Push back button located on the front of the monitoring panel to silence. 3. Open door on front of monitoring panel. When concentration of gas has dropped below 10% LEL on all 6 displays, gas detection system can be reset by pushing red button labeled, “Alarm Acknowledge.” 4. If gas concentration never exceeded 20% LEL, Maintenance Office horn would not have sounded and the red “Alarm Acknowledge” button does not have to be pushed. This detection system will automatically reset after any detection of less than 20% LEL. 5. If at any time the concentration of gas exceeded 40% LEL and the fire alarms were activated, the fire alarm system can now be reset. The fire alarm system is only to be reset after all procedural steps described in “RTA Procedures for Response to Fire Alarm Activation for Operations, Maintenance and Security Personnel” document dated March 16, 1998, have been followed. 6. Reset door and fan operation using computer terminal on filing cabinet in Main- tenance Office using keystroke directions displayed over terminal. Resetting the doors from the computer terminal releases the control of the doors to the push button controllers located at the doors. In order to continue fueling, the doors have to be properly positioned using these push button controllers. 7. Reset natural gas compressors, fuel dispensers, and all flow control valves by turning key switch in the Fuel Station Electrical Control Room. Key switch is labeled Reset and is located on panel labeled “ESD Relay Panel.” Key is to be turned clockwise to stop, then released. When red light next to key switch goes out, reset of compressors, dispensers, and flow control valves is complete. Natural Gas Fueling Station is once again ready for use! February 2001

32 DESCRIPTION OF SAFETY INSPECTIONS FOR RTA FACILITY COMBUSTIBLE GAS DETECTION AND EXHAUSTING EQUIPMENT • The Facilities Maintenance Superintendent will perform the following tasks daily: ✓ Review Siemens System 24-hour history report which prints automatically each morning at 5:00 AM. This report shows activity of air handlers, exhaust fans, and alarms. In addition, it gives all combustible gas sensor readings at the time the report was generated. ✓ After verifying that all equipment functioned properly, report is signed and filed. ✓ Any sensors whose readings are approaching 5% Lower Explosive Level (LEL) are investi- gated and recalibrated if needed. • The Daytime Public Fueling Attendant will perform the following task at the beginning of their shift: ✓ Verify that yellow light at Public Fueling Station is illuminated. This light verifies fire sup- pression system at island is ready to operate. • The Fueling Shift Supervisor will perform the following task at the beginning of their shift: ✓ Verify operation of 2 air handlers and 4 ventilation fans before fueling procedure begins. • The Facilities Maintenance Department will perform the following tasks monthly: ✓ Cycle and visually inspect air handlers and exhaust fans which serve building. Check belt tensions and listen for abnormal noise. ✓ Release test gas at a random combustible gas detector in the original facility. Verify facility operation of exhaust fans, activation of alarms, and shutdown of radiant heaters. ✓ Release test gas at a random combustible gas detector in the fueling station. Verify opera- tion of exhaust fans, doors, Emergency Shutdown System (ESD), and activation of alarms. ✓ Test the ESD by pushing one of the red slap switches located on each of the fuel dispensers and the compressor skids. Verify that the skids will not run and that the pneumatic powered isolation valves installed throughout the system shutdown. ✓ Verify that fuel cannot be dispensed in the fuel island without the air handlers’ small dis- placement fans being turned on and the doors cycled to the correct positions. ✓ Verify operation of the safety eyes located on the inside doors of the fueling station. TRANSIT AGENCY 4—COMPRESSED NATURAL GAS FIELD SERVICE GUIDE FOR FIRST RESPONDERS Scene Assessment Introduction Like other transit vehicles, Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) buses are exposed to a variety of haz- ards and risks—equipment malfunctions, traffic collisions, road conditions, or activities requiring law enforcement involvement. Any one of these hazards may create public safety or environmental con- cerns as well as cause a disruption in service to ______ patrons. First responders may face CNG bus incidents where the possibility of an unscheduled release of gas, a gas leak with fire, or an explo- sion can occur. Though there are various types of CNG vehicles, there are standardized safety oper- ating procedures for the evaluation of vehicle damage and control of the incident. General Guidelines • Approach scene with caution, recon area as necessary; • Ensure that all sources of ignition are eliminated—NO TRAFFIC FLARES; • Establish a safe zone at 50 feet minimum, more expansive as incident dictates; • Conduct a preliminary evaluation by interviewing the bus operator or ______ field supervi- sor on-scene and/or perform a visual inspection.

33 NOTE: Though CNG is considered to be nontoxic, large volumes of the gas in a confined space can displace oxygen and cause asphyxiation. Unscheduled Release of Gas (Gas Leak) • Determine if gas leak [is] present by odor detection, sharp hissing sound, icing on fuel components, or use a hand-held gas detection device; • If a leak is present: ✓ Identify type of CNG bus involved; ✓ Follow Emergency Operating Procedures within this guide for bus specific type (indexed by series number); ✓ Protect against body or eye injury due to release of gas under high pressure; • If no leak is present, initiate public safety duties and request ______ equipment maintenance personnel to determine if bus is to continue in-service operations or is in need of towing. Gas Leak with Fire or Explosion • Lead fire agency to activate Incident Command Structure, Rescue, and Mass Casualty Inci- dent protocols as needed; • Utilize ______ field supervisor/on-scene coordinator as a resource/liaison. Activities Requiring Law Enforcement Involvement • Lead law enforcement agency to activate Incident Command Structure, Hostage, or other incident specific protocols as needed; • Utilize ______ field supervisor/on-scene coordinator as a resource/liaison.

34

1. Engine Compartment Switch Box Action: Stops engine Position the “Rear Engine Run” toggle switch to the center or “OFF” position to shut down the engine. The engine Switch Box assembly is located in the engine compartment and is visible imme- diately upon opening the engine door. 2. Manual Fuel Shutoff Valve Action: Stops fuel flow to engine Turn the BLACK handle 1/4 turn to stop fuel flow to the engine. Caution: Although the shut-off valve is closed, the fuel tanks, distribution lines, the vent lines, and the main supply line above the shutoff valve are still under high pressure. 3. Battery Disconnect Switch Action: Disables main electrical power and shuts off all fuel solenoid valves Slide both battery disconnect switches to the “OFF” position to disable 12 and 24 volt electrical power to all bus components. Disconnecting the battery power will also de-energize (close) the fuel system’s solenoid valves. 4. Manual Fire Suppression Actuator Valve Action: Extinguishes fire in engine compartment Pull the safety ring from manual actuator and press the red “FIRE” button down to initiate the dis- charge of the fire extinguishing agent in the engine compartment. 5. Roof Vent Outlets Action: Depletes gas from fuel system These outlets, located on the right rear roof area, are where unscheduled release of gas occurs. Internal Pressure Relief Devices (PRD) allow for discharge of the gas into the atmosphere when either over-pressurization or excessive heat occurs. DO NOT ATTEMPT TO STOP THIS GAS FROM VENTING. 35 EMERGENCY OPERATING PROCEDURES

Next: Chapter Seven - Observations on Improved Emergency Procedures »
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TRB’s Transit Cooperative Research Program (TCRP) Synthesis 58: Emergency Response Procedures for Natural Gas Transit Vehicles identifies and documents the state of the practice on emergency response protocols to incidents involving natural gas-filled transit buses. The report is designed to assist first responders to natural gas incidents—emergency response professionals such as police officers and fire-fighters; transit agency operations and maintenance employees, police, and security guards; and certain members of the general public.

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