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Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports (2016)

Chapter: Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
×
Page 59
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D - NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study ." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2016. Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/23628.
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50 APPENDIX D NASA Aviation Safety Reporting System Reports Filed at Airports in Study Note: Pertinent sections underlined. Note: Only those ASRS reports that identified the presence or lack of an airport advisory, even if on ASOS/AWOS, as a partial factor in the narrative are shown. ASRS Reports indicating pilot communications, in the form of self-announcing intentions, even if on a combined CTAF/UNICOM, are not shown. Airport identifier appears in bold above the corresponding narrative & synopsis. Pertinent statements to this project, according to the consultant, are underlined. ASRS Report 1: VPZ Narrative: 1 Aircraft being test flown after annual inspection. Preflight and taxi to Runway 27 uneventful. ASOS reported winds 240/8. Shortly after takeoff heard following comment on UNICOM. “Porter County what’s up with the aircraft on 27?” I queried Porter County and they informed me 27 was closed. I completed the flight and landed uneventfully on Runway 18. I discovered the following: 27 had been NOTAMed closed for the day because of surveying. There was no mention of the closure on ASOS. Porter County personnel informed me they are not allowed to put that info on ASOS. Lessons learned: ASOS is not the same as ATIS. Although the closure would have been verbalized on ATIS, it was not on ASOS. Continue to check daily NOTAMs - even on a clear VFR day at a familiar airport. There were no signs, construction, or personnel in sight on the closed runway, and the runway was still closed. Do a radio check before initial taxi. This would have given Porter County an additional opportunity to inform me 27 was closed for the day. Action: Porter County informed me they had multiple aircraft attempt to use 27 that day, including the local flight school. I understand the requirement to check NOTAMs. I feel Porter County should be allowed to also put that information on ASOS. If an aircraft had to use 27 quickly for an emergency landing in most cases they would listen to ASOS and not have time to check NOTAMs. Synopsis A pilot took off for a short flight from VPZ Runway 27 which was NOTAMed closed, but he had not checked NOTAMs and noted he monitored ASOS which the airport was prohibited from using as an airport status notification tool. Consultant Analysis The UNICOM station was used to query an aircraft that had taken off from a closed runway. However, on-field ASOS did not indicate the closure. Pilot feels there is a disconnect between on-field ASOS at this airport and current NOTAMs. Lesson learned: If possible, augment ASOS transmissions with current field information, including closed pavement. ASRS Report 2: TRM Narrative: 1 We were forced to take evasive action three times during a visual approach to Runway 17 at TRM, due [to TCAS] RAs. Approach seemed particularly anxious to have us cancel IFR during descent. Ultimately, we did cancel about 8,000 MSL. ATC did advise us of VFR Bonanza traffic at 10,500 FT which we attempted to avoid by leveling off at 11,000 but which triggered our first RA, which resulted in our first evasive action. This was followed by two more evasive actions at approximately 6,500 and 4,000 respectively. It should be noted that the weather was perfect with unlimited visibility. Upon arrival we had a discussion with FBO manager about our experience. She informed us that this is the busiest day of the year for them. While fueling we noticed traffic departing and arriving on 17 and 35 without incident. In my opinion, the exceptional weather was a factor. We would not have experienced any of this in IMC conditions. As far as the airport goes, the UNICOM is listening only, no airport advisories. We did successfully communicate our intentions with two aircraft during arrival, and at least two during departure. My recommendation is to have a Controller from the PSP Tower man the UNICOM at TRM for holiday weekends during season. Synopsis A CL60 experienced multiple TCAS RAs with VFR traffic while inbound to TRM on a brilliant VMC day. Consultant Analysis The UNICOM station was not issuing airport advisories at this airport on a busy day. Pilot was in need of an airport advisory. Lesson learned: If an airport has an advertised UNICOM frequency, pilots expect that airport advisories are available upon request.

51 ASRS Report 3: AUO Narrative: 1 We announced our taxi intentions for Runway 18 and started to position ourselves at the hold short line at this uncontrolled airport in excellent VFR conditions. We had landed 15 minutes earlier after being advised by Unicom the active runway was 18. The wind remained out of the south 200 @ 6 knots. After all before take-off checklists were complete I scanned the downwind base and final approach positions and found them to be clear of traffic. The First Officer stated clear right. As I started to position our aircraft onto Runway 18 we observed a [light plane], high and just past us on the upwind leg to Runway 18. The First Officer and I assumed this [light aircraft] was maybe missing a practice approach to Runway 36 but after making a call in the blind to the aircraft they stated that they had departed Runway 36. There was never any collision threat but I certainly would have paused a moment longer before starting to position our aircraft onto Runway 18 for departure. Neither I nor the First Officer heard the [other aircraft] announce his departure. In a post flight discussion our crew discussed the events of earlier in the day and noted the potential hazards of operating at uncontrolled airports and the importance of remaining vigilant at all times. Synopsis Corporate jet Captain reports an opposite direction takeoff by a light plane at an uncontrolled airport as he taxis onto Runway 18 for takeoff. Both aircraft were on the correct Unicom frequency but the Captain did not hear any announcements from the light plane pilot. Consultant Analysis Even though UNICOM provided an airport advisory indicating winds favored runway 18, the pilot of a light aircraft departed runway 36, opposite the flow of traffic, according to the airport advisory provided by UNICOM. Lesson learned: UNICOM should only be used to issue airport advisories, and only upon request. ASRS Report 4: COI Narrative: 1 We Took Off On A Vfr Lcl Flt And After Some Airwork Decided To Do Some Lndgs At Coi, A Non Twred Arpt. I Had Chked The Mlb Notams But Not The Coi Notams, Unknown, To Me The Unicom Freq Had Changed And Was Not On The Lcl Chart And Was Not Covered By The Mlb Notams. The Person In The L Seat Called On The Published Unicom Freq And Someone Said Lndg On Rwy 29. Our Airplane Called Downwind, Base And Final. We Landed On Rwy 29. After We Were On The Rwy We Observed The C152 Also On The Rwy. We Both Moved To The R Side Of The Rwy And Passed At A Slow Taxi Spd. There Could Have Been An Accident. The Other Plt Stated He Did Not See Us Until He Was On The Rwy As They Were Practicing An Emer Lndg. Synopsis C172 Pilot Uses Wrong Unicom Frequency To Announce Intentions To Land At Coi. After Touchdown The Pilot Notices A C152 Rolling Out In The Opposite Direction. They Pass In The Middle At Slow Speed. Consultant Analysis The incorrect UNICOM frequency was used to request an airporter advisory, as a result of a recent UNICOM frequency change that was not reflected in current charts or NOTAMs. Although the active runway in use provided by the UNICOM operator matched the airport they were flying into, the aircraft landed against the flow of traffic. Lesson learned: Make certain that a UNICOM frequency change is widely communicated and also verify airport in issuing airport advisories. ASRS Report 5: X59 Narrative: 1 The Event/Sit Occurred At The Valkaria, Fl Arpt (X59) During The Hrs Near Noon. I Flew My First Flt Of The Day, And Was On My Second Flt When The Unicom Operator Came On Duty. He Immediately Started Talking On The Radio Giving Unsolicited Advice, Such As ‘Rwy Is Clr And It’S All Yours.’ I Had Not Asked For Any Info About Rwy Or Anything Else. I Had Announced That I Was Back Taxiing Rwy 14 For Immediate Tkof On Rwy 14. During The Next Several Flts This Unicom Operator Continued To Pass Out Unsolicited Advice To Anybody And Everybody. He Was Trying To Play Acft Ctlr By Telling ‘Acft On Downwind,’ ‘Acft On Final’ And On And On. In One Case There Were 3 Acft In The Tfc Pattern. I Was One Of Them, And 4 Acft Doing A Flyby At 1000 Ft Over Rwy 14. The Unicom Operator Was Telling Them About Noise Abatement Over The Houses E Of The Arpt. At That Point I Told Him ‘Mr X, You Are Messing Things Up.’ I Don’t Know If That Is Why He Finally Slowed Down But I Didn’T Hear Much From Him After That. I Think Someone Else May Have Talked To Him Also. This Man Has Been Talked To Before At This Arpt About Trying To Play Acft Ctlr But He Continues To Do So. In The Interest Of Safety I Think This Man Should Be Gone From The Arpt Before He Causes Someone To Get Hurt. This Man Is Bad News. Supplemental Info From Acn 594990: The County Official On Duty At X59, Valkaria Arpt, Mr X, Was Offering Unsolicited Advice To Acft In The Pattern, Was Stepping On Acft Giving Their Pos Rpts. Mr X’S Xmissions Were Directly Interfering With The Orderly Flow Of Acft In The Volunteer Op. I Have Suggested That Valkaria Unicom Remain Silent With 2 Exceptions: 1) If Requested For Arpt Advisories Or 2) To Alert Acft Of Impending Disaster. This Is A Non-Twred Arpt And The Unicom Should Not Be Used As An Atc Medium.

52 Synopsis An Over-Zealous Unicom Operator Was Creating A Hazardous Condition While Attempting To Act As An Air Tfc Ctlr At A Non Twred Arpt At X59, Fl. Consultant Analysis The UNICOM operator at this airport was offering ATC-like instructions, rather than simple airport advisories upon request. Pilot states this UNICOM operator is creating an unsafe airport. Lesson learned: UNICOM should only be used to issue airport advisories, and only upon request. ASRS Report 6: F70 Narrative: 1 I Crossed The Hold Line After Announcing That I Was Taking Off On Rwy 36 At F70 (French Valley). I Heard An Apl Announce Downwind For Lndg On Rwy 36 And Saw That He Was Mid-Field. After Just Xing Hold Line I Heard Unicom Advise That There Was A Plane On Final. I Stopped Just Across The Line And A Twin Came In And Landed. I Had Not Heard This Airplane Plt Make Any Pos Rpts. He Absolutely Did Not Call Base Or Final Apch. Since I Was In A High Wing Airplane I Couldn'T See Him. (He Made A Normal Lndg.) Synopsis Just After Taxiing Across Rwy Hold Line And Announcing Intentions To Use The Rwy At Non Twr Arpt, The Plt Heard Unicom Advise Of An Acft On Final That He Had Not Seen Or Heard From During Taxi And Run-Up. Consultant Analysis The UNICOM operator notified pilot of landing traffic to avoid a collision after having observed a runway incursion. Lesson learned: The UNICOM operator can enhance airport safety by observing traffic and issuing advisories as appropriate. ASRS Report 7: AUO Narrative: 1 Had A Trip To Auburn, Al (Auo). Got A Wx Briefing From Duats Including Fdc Notams And Notam D’S. Only Notam Given Was Vor Dme Portion Of Apch Not Authorized. Since I Wasn’T Flying An Acft So Equipped, I Wasn’T Concerned. My Coplt Also Received A Wx Briefing Via Duats. He Received The Same Info On Duats About Notams. You Can Imagine My Surprise When I Called Downwind For Rwy 36 Only To Be Told By Unicom That Rwy 36 Was Closed. We Saw The Construction Area S Of The Rwy. Other Than Being Embarrassed, Things Went Fine As It Was Day, Vmc With Great Visibility. Even Without The Info From Unicom We Could Have Figured Things Out. We Chked Published Notams And Found Nothing. Even When We Departed, We Received A Wx Brief From Lcl Fss And Received No Notams On This. The Arpt, Of Course, Had Posted The Rwy Closure And The Lack Of All Apchs. In Light Of The Aspen Crash, And The Question Surrounding Notam Dissemination, I Find This Disturbing! What If We Had Been Imc -- Would Apch Have Clred Us For An Apch To A Closed Rwy? Even More Disturbing Is The Same Thing (Lack Of Notam Dissemination) Is True With Regard To Bowman Field In Louisville. I Am Going Through For Derby And Chked -- No Published Notams, No Fdc Notams, And Only Notam ‘D’ Is 1 Rwy Closure. I Found Out Accidentally From A Friend Who Is A Lcl (Bowman) Plt. Needless To Say, With No Auth Apchs, I Will Be Going To Juy For The Derby. Heads Up -- Just Because You’Re Not Told Doesn’T Mean There Are No Closures. Synopsis After Carefully Chking Notams Prior To Flt To Auo, A Cpr Crew On Ifr Apch Were Surprised To Find The Rwy 18-36 Closed At The Ctaf Arpt. Consultant Analysis The UNICOM operator notified a pilot of a closed runway, after that pilot announced an approach to that runway. Even though a NOTAM had been issued by the airport, FSS did not provide said NOTAM during a pilot briefing. Lesson learned: The UNICOM operator can enhance airport safety by observing traffic and issuing advisories as appropriate. ASRS Report 8: VNC Narrative: 1 Unicom Freqs Are Too Crowded With Plts Trying To Keep Track Of Each Other. Flying From My Home Arpt Of Venice, Fl, I Can Hear Plts Calling In To 9 Different Arpts. While Trying To Give My Pos, I Can Hear Plts Doing The Same Thing From Venice, Sebring, Charlotte County, Wymama, Leesburg, Winter Haven, Lanatana, Keystone And Crystal River. There Is No Time That The Air Is Clr. I Have To Start Xmitting When Someone Else Is On The Air. I Do Not Know If My Message Went Through Or If Perhaps It Was Unreadable, Coming Through As A Loud Squeal. Venice Is

53 Would Have Fewer Arpts In Close Prox Using The Same Freq. I Received A Com That Said We Should Be More Careful When Arriving At Arpts, Looking Around More And Announce Our Pos On Unicom. This Is Impossible To Do With The Freqs As They Are. It Is A Very Dangerous Sit. Please Give Us More Freqs To Use For Unicom Which Will Help Us Avoid Accidents. We Have Radios With The Freqs, Let’S Use Those Extra Ones. Synopsis Rptr Complaint Of Freq Congestion At Most Non Twr Arpts Unicom. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of severe frequency congestion on UNICOM frequency, owing to close proximity and identical frequencies at neighboring airports. Lesson learned: If possible, airports should work with the FAA and FCC to minimize frequency congestion and avoid duplicate frequencies at neighboring airports. ASRS Report 9: BLM Narrative: 1 On Dec/Thu/02, The Capt And I Arrived For Our Flt At Xa00 At Fll. After A Routine Preflt And Wx And Notam Chk, We Discovered That Blm Was Closed On Dec/Wed/02 And Would Be Open Again On Dec/Thu/02 At Xa00Z On Our Arr Date. The Wx Was Clr With A Ne Wind. The Arpt Was Spotted A Few Mi Out And Mcguire Apch Clred Us For A Visual Apch. There Was No Mention To Us About The Arpt Being Notamed Closed At Xb00 After We Had Already Left Fll. We Called Unicom And Did Not Receive Any Response. We Made Normal Location Rpts And Landed On Rwy 32. After Shutdown, We Went To The Fbo And Were Informed That The Rwy Was Closed. The Rwy Was Notamed Closed After Xa00, At Which Time We Were Already In The Air Enrte. Mcguire Apch Nor Blm Unicom Informed Us That The Notam Had Taken Effect. Synopsis F150 Lands At Blm On Closed Rwy. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of no response from UNICOM regarding runway closure. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 10: ELN Narrative: 1 My Student And I Went On A Xcountry Flt From Our Lcl Arpt To Eln, Wa. Prior To Departing, I Received A Thorough Briefing From The Lcl Fss. The Only Notam That Was Mentioned Was An Unlighted Twr. About 20 Mi From The Eln Arpt, We Tuned Into The Asos. The Wind Was Variable At 4 Kts. I Chked The ‘Flt Guide’ And Saw That The Preferred Rwy With Winds Under 5 Kts Is Rwy 7. We Had Been Monitoring The Ctaf For 10-15 Mins And There Was No Rpted Tfc, And We Were Coming Off Of The V2 Airway, And We Were Lined Up Straight-In For Rwy 7. We Announced A 5 Mi Straight-In Final And A 3 Mi Final For Rwy 7. We Taxied For Tkof To The Xing Rwy 29. After Announcing ‘Taking Off Rwy 29, Straight Out Dep,’ We Were Informed By Unicom That We Had Just Landed On A Closed Rwy (Rwy 7). After Tkof And Clbing To A Safe Alt, We Circled And Flew Along The Entire Length Of Rwy 7/25 To Confirm That There Was Not A Yellow X Painted On The Rwy, And There Was Not! We Informed Unicom That We Had Not Seen Any Notams Pertaining To A Closed Rwy, Nor Any X’S On The Rwy. After Lndg, I Consulted The Afd And Saw That, Listed In The Remarks Section At Eln, Rwy 7/25 Is Closed. I Guess I Learned A Lesson: Consult The Afd Prior To Lndg At Any Unfamiliar Arpt. But Why Were There Not Any X’S On The Closed Rwy? Even A Temporary One? And Why Were There Not Any Notams Out For This? Any Why Wasn’T There Any Notice Put On The Asos Warning Of The Closed Rwy? I’Ve Heard Similar Notices On Other Asos’S. And, Better Yet, Why Didn’T Unicom Inform Me Of The Closed Rwy After I Announced Final For Rwy 7? Twice? Synopsis A C172 Instructor And Student Landed On A Closed Rwy At Eln. Consultant Analysis Pilot lands on closed runway because of his unawareness of the runway closure. UNICOM station did not provide notice of closed runway, nor did ASOS. Closed runway was also not indicated closed with Xs. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. Not The Only Arpt With This Prob. When I Fly Xcountry I Run Into The Same Prob At Every Non Ctled Arpt I Come To. We Need More Freqs To Use For Unicom. A First Step Would Be To Use The .05 Freqs Like 122.75 And 122.95. We

54 Take One Last Walkaround The Plane. To Prevent Recurrence, Must Take Time To Walk Around Even On A Quick Turn Before Entering Flt Deck. The Time Pressures Are Only Perceived To Be There. There Is Always Time For Thoroughness And Safety. Fixed Prob: Put Cotter Pin With Red Streamers So Tail Stand Is More Noticeable. Synopsis Bn-2Amk Iii Trislander Cargo Plt Left Tail Stand Attached During Taxi Out Resulting In Unicom Operator Alerting Him To The Error. Consultant Analysis Pilot is notified by UNICOM operator of aircraft tail stand left in position on taxi out. Lesson learned: UNICOM station can monitor airport activity and notify pilots of hazards to prevent accidents. ASRS Report 12: PWT Narrative: 1 It Was A Clear Day, Wind Calm, When I Decided To Make A Practice Ils Apch On Rwy 19 At Bremerton Arpt, Wa, (Kpwt). The Bremerton Awos Rpted The Wind To Be Calm. When I Called Pwt Unicom For Rwy In Use, I Received No Answer. When Intercepting The Ils Outside The Outer Marker, I Announced On The Ctaf That I Was On A Long Final For Rwy 19 At Bremerton. When On 1 1/2 Mile Final I Announced On The Ctaf That I Was On Short Final For Rwy 19 At Bremerton. When On 1/2 Mile Final, I Observed Light Single Engine Acft Climb Out In The Opposite Direction Of My Flt. That Airplane Was In My Estimation Then 900 Ft Above Me, And 2000 Ft To The L Of Me. At No Time Were We Close To A Nmac. Throughout The Apch The Only Radio Com That I Heard On The Ctaf Was Tfc That Appeared To Be Flying To Or From Skagit Regional Arpt, (Kbvs), At No Time Did I Hear Any Bremerton Tfc Info. Callback Conversation With Rptr Revealed The Following Info: Rptr Indicated That He Had A Face To Face Encounter With The C150 Plt Later, Who Accused Him Of Not Maintaining A Listening Watch On Ctaf. Rptr Contends That He Monitored The Ctaf For The Pwt Arpt And Never Heard The C150 Announce His Intentions That He Was Departing From The Opposite End Of The Rwy. Synopsis Be18 On A Short Final To Rwy 19 At Pwt, Encounters A C150 On Its Climb Out Form The Opposite Direction. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of no response from UNICOM regarding airport advisory request. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 13: SUT Narrative: 1 While Holding Short Of The Rwy (Single 4000 Ft) On The Txwy. My Student And I Heard An Indistinct Transmission On The Acft Radio Neither Of Us Made Out What It Was. I Instructed The Student To Visually Clr The Apch Path Which He Did. We Radioed That We Were Back Taxing On Rwy 23 Then Taxied On To The Active. Just As We Were On The Rwy, Unicom (In The Fbo) Advised There Was An Acft On Final. I Looked And Saw The T-34 On A Close In L Base To Final. I Immediately Took Control Of Our Acft And Taxied Onto The Grass. The T-34 Landed And Taxied Off The Txwy We Had Just Been On. We Never Saw The T-34 Because He Made A Low Left Base And Was Obscured By The Trees Off The L Side Of The Rwy. I Don’t Believe We Could Have Prevented This Because We Didn’T Hear Him Or See Him Until He Was On Short Final. A Fairly Busy Unicom Frequency Also Contributed To My Not Recognizing A Base To Final Call Also Played A Part. Callback Conversation With Rptr Revealed The Following Info: Rptr Was Positive That The Main Prob Was The Low Apch And Close Pattern Of The Second Acft. He Was Obscured By The Trees. The Quality Of His Radio Com Was Very Garbled And Not Understandable. He Feel The Trees Should Be Cut. But Also That The Standard Pattern Procs Need To Be Followed. He Felt His Action Was Not Dangerous As The Grass Is Often Used For Lndgs And Is Very Suitable For Acft Movement. He Felt There Was Not Real Danger As The Other Acft Would Have Seen His Acft On The Rwy. The Trees Are Located On Pvt Property Adjacent To The Arpt, Not On The Arpt Property. Synopsis Instructor With Student Back Taxies On Rwy (No Txwy) And Is Informed By Unicom Of An Acft Turning Onto Final. He Taxied Onto Grass Next To Rwy Which Is Often Used For Lndg Practice And The Second Acft Lands. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports the UNICOM operator advised of an aircraft on final approach, as his aircraft was back taxiing on the runway, thereby preventing a collision. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 11: PWT Narrative: 1 Accidentally Left Tail Stand In Place And Taxied Out To Rwy. Unicom Called And Told Me, So I Shut Down And Removed And Stowed The Tail Stand. Landed In Pwt Around Xb00. A Quick Turn Then To Bfi. Normally, I Don’T Put The Tail Stand In Since We Just Add A Few Boxes In The Front. This Time, I Put It In Expecting A Greater Load. Contributing Factor Was A Break In Routine (Putting The Stand In Place). Also, A Quick Turn And Choosing Not To

55 Gps Apch To Hao (Gps 11). Wx Clr 6 Sm Visibility, Winds At 040 Degs 4 Kts. Contacted Hao Unicom 50 Nm Out To Pull Out Company Car And Be Preparing To Receive Acft. No Tfc Rpted. With Wind Conditions, Chose To Land On Rwy 11. Contacted Cincinnati Apch And Clred For Gps 11 Apch. At 5 Nm, Terminated Ifr And Asked For Any Tfc In Area -- None Rpted By Apch. Switched To Unicom And Made Several Calls On Advisory Freq 123.05. No Response From Any Acft. On Short Final At 200-300 Ft Agl (With All Lights On), Received Xmission On Unicom From Another Plt On Gnd That A Piper Cub Was On Short Final Rwy 29 (Same Rwy, Different Direction). Saw Cub Touching Down At Opposite End. Made Full Pwr Wave-Off And Clbed To Pattern Alt. Cub Executed Touch-And-Go And Stayed In Pattern. We Then Made Uneventful Lndg. Cub Was Not Equipped With Radio (Even Hand-Held) Or Lights. Unicom Never Rpted Tfc In Area (Man Inside Reading Newspaper). This Is A Dangerous Sit That Could Have Resulted In 5+ Fatalities. Cub Plt Told Fbo Mgr To F___ Off When Asked Previously About Ops Without Radio. This Has Got To Stop Or I Will Move Acft To A Ctled Field. Synopsis A Cpr Jet Plt Was Forced To Go Around By An Acft Operating Without Radios Or Lights At Hao. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of no response from UNICOM regarding runway closure. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 15: MGY Narrative: 1 Plt Received 2 Briefings From Fss, For 2 Individual Flts Originating From And Returning To Mgy. Ifr Flt Plans For Both Flts Were Filed And Activated. Neither Fss Briefer Advised Plt Of Any Notam For Rwy Closure. Final Flt Departed Mgy For Uni At Xa35 Lcl. No Notice Of Rwy Closure Was Posted At Mgy. Final Leg Of Second Flt Departed Uni At Xf05 Lcl, And Zid Issued Ifr Clrnc To Mgy. When Flt Was Approx 30 Nm From Mgy, Dayton Apch Advised That Rwy 02/20 (The Only Rwy) At Mgy Was Closed Effective Xa00 And Requested Intentions Of Plt. After Ineffective Attempts To Get Clarification Of Sit From Unicom, Plt Canceled Insts And Advised Atc Of Intention To Make Low Apch, Light Up Rwy, And Determine If Rwy Was In Fact Closed And If Lndg Could Be Safely Accomplished. On First Low Apch, Unidented Persons On Unicom Falsely Advised Plt That Rwy Was Closed And That There Was Painting Equip On Rwy. Plt Executed 2 Low Apchs, Determined That Rwy Was Free Of Obstructions And That No Closure Markings (X’S) Were Displayed. During Third Low Apch, Unidented Party On Unicom Once Again Falsely Advised Plt That The Rwy Had Paint Cans And Equip On It. Lndg Was Accomplished Without Incident. After Eng Shutdown, Plt And Pax Were Accosted By Individual Claiming That His Painting Crew Had Been Endangered And Threats Of Reprisals By Faa. This Potentially Dangerous Sit Should Have Been Avoided: By Having Notams Which Advise Of Closure Of All The Rwys At A Given Arpt Stated In Terms Of Arpt Closure Not Rwy Closure. Fss Specialists Should Always Advise Of The Closure Of Arpts Of Intended Ops During Preflt Briefings. Program Atc Computers To Not Accept Ifr Flt Plans Which Would Propose Lndgs At Arpts During Time Of Closure. Prohibit Atc From Issuing Ifr Clrncs To Arpts Which Are ‘Closed.’ Outlaw The Xmission Of Bogus Field And Or Rwy Conditions On Unicom. Advise All Arpt Operators That ‘Closed Rwys’ Are To Be Designated By The Display Of Appropriate Markings (Large X’S). Synopsis A Plt Of A C402 Was Advised Once By Apch, Then Twice By Mgy Unicom, That The Arpt Was Closed Because of Painting Equip On The Rwy. Assessing The Unicom Info As False The Plt Landed Anyway And Was Then Accused Of Endangering People And Property. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of inaccurate advisories on UNICOM regarding closed runway because of painting. Lesson learned: UNICOM station be should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. NOTAMs should be issued to indicate closed pavement and Xs used to visually indicate closed runways. ASRS Report 16: LDJ Narrative: 1 2 Acft Attempted A Simultaneous Dep In Opp Directions On The Same Rwy. This Was Discovered During Rollout. Sma X Aborted Tkof. Sma Y Continued Dep, Rwy 9, With Quick Turn To S. Prior To An Ifr Dep From The Uncontrolled Field, Fbo Personnel Advised The Sma X Plt That Rwy 9 Deps (Ifr) Were Discouraged By Ewr Dep Ctl--Long Delays Could Be Experienced If Requesting This Direction. Sma X Taxied Ot Dep End Of Rwy 27 For Run-Up And Clrnc Delivery. Other Acft Were Departing Rwy 9. Wind Appeared To Be Calm, But Wind Sock Favored Rwy 9. Prior To Dep, The Sma X Advised Unicom Of Its Intentions. Before Taking Rwy, Lndg Lights And Strobes Were On. Immediately After Beginning Tkof Roll, Unicom Announcement Was Made By Gnd Acft Of Fbo Of Conflicting Tfc On Rwy. ASRS Report 14: HAO Narrative: 1

56 Announced Dep Rwy 27 And Left W/O Further Incident. The Sma Y Announced Over The Radio That The Incident, “. . . Scared The Zz Out Of Me.” Factors Contributing To The Incident Included Time Of Day (Dusk) And Dep Into Setting Sun, Failure Of Y To Monitor Or Hear X Dep Announcement, Reluctance Of Ewr Dep To Accept Rwy 9 Ifr Deps. The Situation Could Be Avoided With A Vfr Rwy 9 Dep (Upwind), Followed By A Normal Tfc Pattern Dep. This Dep Proc Should Be Encouraged By Atc And Lcl Plts. Synopsis Uncontrolled Arpt 2 Sma Acft Plts Started Simultaneous Tkofs From Opposite Ends Of Same Rwy. Reporter Aborted His Tkof, Other Acft Continued Tkof. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports that UNICOM operator advised of proper procedures at the airport. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including proper procedures) can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 17: LNC Narrative: 1 Apched Lnc, An Uncontrolled Field For Lndg On Rwy 13. Preflt Briefing And Other Lcl Arpts Using S Oriented Rwys. Announced Intentions To Enter Pattern On Standard Basis And Announced Downwind, Base And Final. Sma B Also Announced Pattern For 13. An Smt C Announced For Rwy 31. I Asked For Clarification On Unicom (122.7), But Received No Response. Turning Final, I Noted A Small High Wing Sma D Departing 31. He Turned E, I Turned W. 2 Other Inbnd Acft Also Asked For Advisories When Apching Lnc. No One In The Air Or On The Gnd Acknowledged Or Responded. The Active Fbo At Lnc Was Monitoring 122.7. It Is Not Known If Gnd Com To The Fbo/Pattern Tfc Was Possible. A Potentially Embarrassing, If Not Dangerous, Situation Was Avoided Owing to the Vigilance Of Departing Acft And Me. Comfortable Avoidance Was Executed. Perhaps Radio Technique Should Be Stressed For Plts Typically Operating From Uncontrolled Field During Bfr'S. More Unicom Ctaf Freqs Should Be Available To Aviation. 122.7 Is A Congested Freq In The Lnc Area. It Is Possible Other Broadcast Concurrent With My Announcements. Synopsis Traffic Troubles At An Uncontrolled Arpt. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of no response from UNICOM regarding runway closure. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 18: BTP Narrative: 1 While Flying In The Vicinity Of Mc Ville Arpt, I Decided To Fly To Butler To See The New Wx Computer Sys. Enrte, I Listened To The Ctaf For Butler, 122.8, And Heard Acft Announcing Tkofs And Lndgs On Rwy 26 At Butler. Upon Arr, I Announced On The Radio Entry Into The Tfc Pattern For Rwy 26 And Entered The Downwind For That Rwy At A 45 Deg Angle. I Noticed An Acft At Approx 100’ Which Had Apparently Just Taken Off From Rwy 26. This Tended To Confirm My Belief That Rwy 26 Was The Active Rwy. I Continued My Downwind And Announced On The Radio A Left Base For Rwy 26. I Then Noticed Machinery At The Overrun Of Rwy 26 Sitting On The #’S. I Also Noticed A Car Come Off The Txwy, Onto The Rwy And Then Into The Overrun. The Car Stopped In The Overrun. I Announced On The Radio That I Was On Final For Rwy 26 And Lined Up With That Rwy. It Then Appeared That This Rwy'S Threshold Bars Began Halfway Down The Rwy. I Assumed That The Beginning Part Of The Rwy Was Closed And Therefore Landed Beyond The Threshold Bars. At No Time Did I See Any Markings On The Rwy To Indicate It Was Closed For Its Entire Length. At No Time Did I Receive A Radio Message That Rwy 26 Was Closed. I Proceeded To The Plt Shop And Was Confronted By An Engineer Who Told Me I Had Landed On A Closed Rwy. On Departing, This Time Using The Txwy For Rwy 26 After Observing Other Acft Using The Txwy, I Noticed At The End Of Rwy 26 That There Was A Dark Orange X That Was Not Very Noticeable. It Appeared To Be Made Out Of Line And Was Located At The Threshold Of Rwy 8. During This Time, There Was A Woman On The Unicom But She Made No Attempt To Tell Me That Rwy 26 Was Closed And That The Parallel Txwy Was Being Used Instead. I Saw No X Prior To Lndg, Just Vehicles At The Overrun. This Incident Was Created Because A Rwy Was Apparently Closed At An Uncontrolled Field W/O Placing Clear Markings On The Rwy To Indicate Its Status. This Was Further Compounded By All The Acft Using The Arpt And The Arpt Unicom Xmitting That Rwy 25 Was Active W/O Indicating That In Fact Lndgs And Tkofs Were Being Made From The Txwy. Callback Conversation With Rptr Revealed The Following: Reporter Would Only Say “Talk To My Lawyer.” Synopsis Plt Of Sma Landed At Uncontrolled Arpt On Rwy With Construction In Progress, Obscured X, Not Very Noticeable. Traffic Using Parallel Txwy For Lndg And Tkof. Notam Regarding Rwy Closed Had Been Issued. For Dep. Unicom Comment Was Made By Fbo Or Other Gnd Acft That Y Did Not Have “A Good Radio.” X Then X Immediately Terminated Dep. Y Continued Dep And Collision Was Avoided By About 2000’. X Back-Taxied To 27

57 Pilot reports that UNICON operator did not indicate runway was closed and operating were being conducted on the taxiway. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should be staffed and UNICOM frequency monitored so that advisories (including runway closures) can be issued upon pilot request. ASRS Report 19: 15G Narrative: 1 I was the pilot of a light aircraft. Practicing a Soft-Field Takeoff from the Right Seat, in preparation for a CFI Checkride. The second aircraft was being taxied for maintenance purposes with the upper cowling removed. This aircraft was not making any transmissions on the CTAF (Common Traffic Advisory Frequency). As we approached rotation speed, approx. 45 mph, the second aircraft taxied onto the active runway. Had I not taken immediate evasive action, a collision may have resulted. Upon seeing the aircraft enter the active runway, I immediately closed the throttle and applied maximum braking. No response or transmissions were made from the other aircraft, which cleared the active and continued taxiing. This is not the first type of event at 15G. Last year, a truck entered the active runway and collided with a Cessna 150 that was in the flare. Measures have been taken to ensure pedestrians, motor vehicles, etc, remain off of the runway/taxiway environment. Obviously, we must focus our actions on preventing aircraft from creating a hazard to other aircraft. This would have been prevented if: 1.) Proper visual lookout was maintained by the person taxiing the other aircraft, 2.) The person taxiing the other aircraft was making and receiving traffic advisories over the CTAF. As pilots, we must always emphasize the See and Avoid concept. Whether operating an aircraft with the intention of flight or not, we must continue to keep a lookout for other air traffic and maintain proper situational awareness at all times. Synopsis Light plane pilot on takeoff roll at uncontrolled airport reports runway incursion by another aircraft taxiing for maintenance. Takeoff is aborted and other aircraft continues on across runway without communication. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports of near collision on runway with another aircraft, as well as vehicle-aircraft collision that recently occurred. Lesson learned: Minimize vehicle/pedestrian traffic on the movement area and ensure that vehicle operators communicate on the appropriate frequency to announce intentions. ASRS Report 20: JYO Narrative: 1 We Were Entering The Dc Adiz To Return To Jyo. Having Picked Up Our Code, We Were 21 Nm W Of Aml, But Had Not Heard That Our ‘Code Was Observed.’ So We Decided To Let The Ctlr Know That We Had The Arpt In Sight Already (Which Was A Bit Unusual In Dc, But The Visibility Was Fairly Good). The Ctlr Advised Us Code Observed And That We Had Tfc To Our R Returning To Jyo As Well, But In Another Ctlr‘S Sector. At This Point, Change To Advisory Was Approved, Which Is Again, Highly Unusual, But Great Actually. It Would Make The Events That Unfolded Much Clearer. We Switched To Advisory And Followed A 20 Mile Extended 45 For The Arpt, Looking For The Cessna 172 To Our R. We Would Never Actually See The Airplane Until It Turned Base For Rwy 17. The Cessna Called 10 Nm W Of The Field On Ctaf And We Rpted In Behind At 11. The Winds Were Out Of The S At 3, And Both Airplanes Were Established (As Rpted) On A Recommended 45 Entry To Midfield Downwind For Rwy 35. The Cessna Requested Intentions For Lndg And We Advised That We Would Follow The Lead Of The Cessna. The Cessna Indicated A Preference To Use Rwy 35 And We Acknowledged That Was Fine. At About 8 Miles Out, Another Acft, A Diamond, Announced They Were 6 Miles Nne Of The Field And Requested An Arpt Advisory. Despite The Previous Communications On The Ctaf, The Fbo Counter Person Advised The Diamond That They Were Recommending Rwy 17 An No Info On Other Acft Operations Was Provided. It Turns Out That The Fbo Has Been Advised By The Town And Possibly Tsa To Recommend Rwy 17 For Calm Wind Operations. This Is Not Published In The Afd. With High Frequency Of Training Operations To The W, Rwy 17 Is Problematic. The Diamond Announced Intentions To Join The Upwind For Rwy 17. We Then Announced A 4 Mile 45 To Join The Upwind, And The Cessna Advised That It Would Be Joining The Upwind For A Circuit To Downwind To Rwy 17. The Previous Plans Were Out The Window. What Happened Next Is Very Confusing. The Diamond Rpted Joining The Upwind, And Then So Did The Cessna. I Don’T Believe That Either Acft Knew The Position Of The Other And The Dusky Conditions Made Spotting Acft Very Difficult. The Diamond Plt Then Announced That He Was Quite Disturbed That Another Acft Was Joining The Upwind At The Same Time He Was And Announced That He Was, ‘Getting Out Of There.’ The Cessna Rpted A Few Seconds Later Turning Xwind For Rwy 17. At This Point We Were 1.5 Nm From The Field And I Announced Our Position And Intentions To Join The Upwind For Rwy 17. At This Point, I Saw The Diamond Heading Right For Us Xing The Threshold Heading Sw. I Banked The Airplane To The R For Two Reasons, First To Turn Away And Second To Increase Our Visible Profile. The Diamond Widened Out And Turned To The R Also To Follow Us On Downwind. The Rest Of The Pattern Operations Were Normal. Contributing Factors To Confused Pattern Operations And Nmac: 1) Late Call By The Diamond. This Is Typical In The Adiz As Ctlrs Don’t Typically Release Airplanes To Ctaf Before Plts Rpt Field In Sight -- And Even Then Atc Will Hold Coms Until The Acft Is Closer To The Field. 2) Non-Recommended Pattern Entry By The Diamond -- A Straight In Lndg Would Have Been A Better Choice Than Crossing The Base Leg Of The Pattern To Join The Upwind. 3) Failure By The Diamond Plt To Give Way Initially To Acft To The Right Of Its Position Established For Lndg -- He Seemed To Rely More On Who Broadcasted First From His Perspective Than Visual Cues. 4) Consultant Analysis

58 Unpublished Recommendation On Arpt Pattern Operations. In Summary, This Rpt Is Being Filed Because There Is A Significant Safety Of Flt Issue Here. Synopsis A Pa28 Plt At Ctaf Jyo Describes A Tfc Conflict That He Experienced And Suggests Possible Mitigating Procs. Consultant Analysis Pilot reports conflicting advisory (runway in use) from UNICOM operator even though traffic was using another runway. Pilot considered this an incomplete airport advisory. Lesson learned: UNICOM station should monitor existing airport traffic and issues airport advisories accordingly upon pilot request. Failure Of The Plts On The 45 To Assert Previous Intentions To Land On Rwy 35. 5) Low Shelf On The Class B Airspace Prevents Overflying The Arpt From The W. 6) The Dusky Grey Murk Didn’T Inhibit Gnd Visibility, But Made Sighting Acft Very Difficult. 7) Incomplete Arpt Advisory Did Not Account For Acft Already Maneuvering To Land. 8)

Abbreviations and acronyms used without definitions in TRB publications: A4A Airlines for America AAAE American Association of Airport Executives AASHO American Association of State Highway Officials AASHTO American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials ACI–NA Airports Council International–North America ACRP Airport Cooperative Research Program ADA Americans with Disabilities Act APTA American Public Transportation Association ASCE American Society of Civil Engineers ASME American Society of Mechanical Engineers ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials ATA American Trucking Associations CTAA Community Transportation Association of America CTBSSP Commercial Truck and Bus Safety Synthesis Program DHS Department of Homeland Security DOE Department of Energy EPA Environmental Protection Agency FAA Federal Aviation Administration FAST Fixing America’s Surface Transportation Act (2015) FHWA Federal Highway Administration FMCSA Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration FRA Federal Railroad Administration FTA Federal Transit Administration HMCRP Hazardous Materials Cooperative Research Program IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers ISTEA Intermodal Surface Transportation Efficiency Act of 1991 ITE Institute of Transportation Engineers MAP-21 Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century Act (2012) NASA National Aeronautics and Space Administration NASAO National Association of State Aviation Officials NCFRP National Cooperative Freight Research Program NCHRP National Cooperative Highway Research Program NHTSA National Highway Traffic Safety Administration NTSB National Transportation Safety Board PHMSA Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration RITA Research and Innovative Technology Administration SAE Society of Automotive Engineers SAFETEA-LU Safe, Accountable, Flexible, Efficient Transportation Equity Act: A Legacy for Users (2005) TCRP Transit Cooperative Research Program TDC Transit Development Corporation TEA-21 Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (1998) TRB Transportation Research Board TSA Transportation Security Administration U.S.DOT United States Department of Transportation

NO N-PRO FIT O RG . U.S. PO STAG E PA ID CO LUM BIA, M D PER M IT NO . 88 TRANSPORTATION RESEARCH BOARD 5 0 0 F ifth S tre e t, N W W a s h in g to n , D C 2 0 0 0 1 A D D R ESS SER VICE R EQ UESTED ISBN 978-0-309-38974-7 9 7 8 0 3 0 9 3 8 9 7 4 7 9 0 0 0 0

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 Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports
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TRB’s Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Synthesis 75: Airport Advisories at Non-Towered Airports documents the manner in which non-towered airports provide advisories to pilots regarding winds, traffic, and runways in use. Unlike with pilot advisories, there is little guidance available for airport operators in providing airport advisories. The objective of this report is to aggregate available guidance on this topic and document information from non-towered airports with at least 50,000 annual aircraft operations. The report includes a literature review and a telephone interview survey of 165 non-towered airports. Six case examples are included, documenting effective airport advisory programs in place at airports.

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