National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

Appendix A

Workshop Agenda

WORKSHOP ON IMPROVING COLLECTION OF INDICATORS OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM INVOLVEMENT IN POPULATION HEALTH DATA PROGRAMS

March 29–30, 2016
Keck Center of the National Academies of
Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
500 Fifth Street, NW, Washington, DC

Tuesday, March 29, 2016
Open Session, 9:00am–5:00pm
Room 101
Setting the Stage
9:00am Call to Order

Breakfast available in the meeting room

Welcome and Introduction

Brian Harris-Kojetin, CNSTAT Deputy Director

J. Nadine Gracia, OMH Director and Deputy Assistant Secretary for Minority Health

Purpose of the Workshop

Wendy Manning, Committee Chair

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Value of the Committee’s Work to Criminal Justice Populations

Glenn Martin, JusticeLeadershipUSA

Understanding What Should Be Measured
10:00am Linkages between Incarceration and Health: Current State of Knowledge

Michael Massoglia, University of Wisconsin

Exploring connections between criminal justice involvement and various components of health, including drug and alcohol abuse. Considering measurement challenges and the need for changes in data collection, as well as an agenda for new research.

10:45am Coffee Break
11:00am Unpacking the term “Criminal Justice Involvement”

Defining Criminal Justice Involvement through Various Constructs

Chris Wildeman, Cornell University (committee member)

A brief overview of existing work/literature that attempts to define criminal justice involvement in terms of demographics such as racial disparity, gender, age, and poverty. Identifying key differences in the mechanisms underlying various states of incarceration and supervision. Defining criminal justice involvement by nature of contact, as well as by length, recency, and prevalence of criminal justice involvement.

A First Attempt: BGSU Measuring Incarceration in Household Surveys Study

Wendy Manning, Bowling Green State University

Lessons learned from the 2012 ASPE-sponsored study, as well as a look at the resulting product, the Survey of Criminal Justice Experience.

12:30pm Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
1:30pm Direct vs. Indirect Effects of Criminal Justice Involvement

Criminal Justice Involvement and Its Impacts on the Individual, the Family, and the Community

John Hagan, Northwestern University; Holly Foster, Texas A&M University

How an individual’s criminal justice involvement can affect the individual, his or her family, extended family, and the community at large in many different ways.

Health Effects as Consequences

Christopher Uggen, University of Minnesota

Collateral consequences on health stemming from criminal justice system involvement.

3:00pm Coffee Break
3:15pm What More Do We Need to Understand?—A Facilitated Session

Facilitator—Ross Matsueda, University of Washington

ParticipantsEvelyn Patterson, Vanderbilt University; Daniel Nagin, Carnegie Mellon University; Ingrid Binswanger, University of Colorado Medical School

Participants will consider the causal components of criminal justice involvement on health; identify the critical unanswered research questions and the data needed to explore those answers (including effective sample sizes); and discuss whether various proposals for data collection would be sufficient for the most critical end uses.

4:45pm Day 1 Wrap-Up
5:00pm Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Wednesday, March 30, 2016
Open Session, 9:00am–3:00pm
Room 101
Identifying Best Approaches to Measurement
9:00am Breakfast available in the meeting room

Collecting Indicators of Criminal Justice Involvement on Existing Health Surveys: Five Core Health Surveys as Potential Vehicles

Marcie Cynamon, NCHS (NHIS); Wayne Giles, CDC (BRFSS) (via phone); Arthur Hughes, SAMHSA (NSDUH); Anjani Chandra, NCHS (NSFG); Kathryn Porter, NCHS (NHANES)

We will hear about each of these five core datasets—the nature of the survey, the target population, and the purpose of data collection. We will also consider how questions about criminal justice involvement and administrative record linkage could be incorporated within a consent form such as the one used for the NHANES.

10:30am Coffee Break
10:45am Insights from Alternative Approaches

Facilitator—John Laub, University of Maryland (committee member)

Panel Members—James Lynch, University of Maryland; Elizabeth Cooksey, Ohio State University (NLSY); John Boyle, ICF International; Amanda Geller, New York University (Fragile Families); David Johnson, University of Michigan (PSID)

Experience in collecting information about criminal justice involvement in various scenarios may be helpful in the successful development of linkages to health characteristics. The panel’s discussion will center on the following: linking criminal justice involvement to social surveys (such as NLSY, PSID, Fragile Families, Add Health); criminal justice and inmate surveys; and the potential use of administrative records to identify past incarceration.

12:00pm Lunch
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
1:00pm Crafting Potential Questions

Asking Sensitive Questions in Surveys

Ting Yan, Westat

Capturing Criminal Justice Involvement in a Few Simple Questions

David Cantor, Westat

Presenting strawman examples of potential survey questions. Discussion of strengths/weaknesses with regard to adding questions to differently administered surveys (modality), including potential impact on response rates.

2:00pm Coffee Break
2:15pm Wrap-Up Discussion

Wendy Manning, Bowling Green State University; John Laub, University of Maryland; Emily Wang, Yale University

Committee members’ summaries and impressions of the workshop.

3:00pm Adjourn
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page75
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page76
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page77
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page78
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page79
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page80
Next: Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers »
Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $58.00 Buy Ebook | $46.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In the U.S. criminal justice system in 2014, an estimated 2.2 million people were in incarcerated or under correctional supervision on any given day, and another 4.7 million were under community supervision, such as probation or parole. Among all U.S. adults, 1 in 31 is involved with the criminal justice system, many of them having had recurring encounters.

The ability to measure the effects of criminal justice involvement and incarceration on health and health disparities has been a challenge, due largely to limited and inconsistent measures on criminal justice involvement and any data on incarceration in health data collections. The presence of a myriad of confounding factors, such as socioeconomic status and childhood disadvantage, also makes it hard to isolate and identify a causal relationship between criminal justice involvement and health. The Bureau of Justice Statistics collects periodic health data on the people who are incarcerated at any given time, but few national-level surveys have captured criminal justice system involvement for people previously involved in the system or those under community supervision—nor have they collected systematic data on the effects that go beyond the incarcerated individuals themselves.

In March 2016 the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop meant to assist the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) and Office of the Minority Health (OMH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in identifying measures of criminal justice involvement that will further their understanding of the socioeconomic determinants of health. Participants investigated the feasibility of collecting criminal justice experience data with national household-based health surveys. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!