National Academies Press: OpenBook

Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop (2017)

Chapter:Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers

« Previous: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers

INGRID BINSWANGER (Speaker) is a senior investigator at the Institute for Health Research at Kaiser Permanente Colorado. She is also an associate professor in the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, where she directs the primary care research fellowship and the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Training Program. Her research focuses on preventing the medical complications of substance use, such as overdoses, in high-risk populations. She also conducts research on the health of people involved in the criminal justice system and the risks associated with care transitions between prison and community. She has served as a visiting fellow to the Bureau of Justice Statistics, where she helped develop a framework for the collection of national health indicators on criminal justice populations. She has an M.S. in health and medical sciences from the University of California, an M.A. in public health from the University of Washington, and an M.D. from the University of California, San Francisco.

JOHN BOYLE (Speaker) is senior vice president and leads the survey research practice at ICF International. Previously, he held senior positions at Abt SRBI, and Louis Harris and Associates and was on the graduate teaching faculty of the University of Maryland and the research faculty of Columbia University’s School of Public Health. His work focuses on the design, execution, analysis, and reporting of large-scale health surveys. He has also conducted surveys of intimate partner violence; rape; other forms of sexual assault and stalking; crime victims’ experience with police, prosecutors, courts, parole boards, and other components of the criminal

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

justice system; and the first survey of the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder among U.S. ground troops in Vietnam. He has directed health surveys for many federal agencies, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Office of Technology Assessment, the Department of Veterans Affairs, and the Department of Defense.

DAVID CANTOR (Speaker) is a senior statistical fellow at Westat and a research professor at the Joint Program for Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland. His work is in designing social surveys and evaluating the effects of social policy covering a range of criminological and methodological topics, including the correlates of victimization risk, the measurement of personal victimization, survey nonresponse and nonresponse bias, and the use of incentives on surveys and panel conditioning. He is currently conducting research on the design of victimization surveys with a particular focus on the collection of data on sexual violence. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

ANJANI CHANDRA (Speaker) is a demographer/health scientist in the Reproductive Statistics Branch of the Division of Vital Statistics of the National Center for Health Statistics. She conducts research on the fertility and reproductive health of women, including pregnancies and birth, infertility, surgical sterilization, and related aspects of union and family formation. Her primary research interests—social and family demography, reproductive and perinatal health, and survey research methods—are represented in numerous publications and presentations. In her work with the National Survey of Family Growth, Dr. Chandra designs survey instruments that reflect current data needs of the demographic and health research community; tests and evaluates questionnaires; oversees interviewer training, fieldwork, and data collection; and prepares the data for public use, including data cleaning, variable construction, and documentation. She has a B.S. in biology from Yale University and a Ph.D. in demography with a minor in epidemiology from the Johns Hopkins University School of Public Health.

ELIZABETH COOKSEY (Speaker) is professor of sociology at Ohio State University. Her main areas of research focus on social demography, life-course transitions, and the development of youth and children. She is currently studying adolescent sexual and contraceptive behaviors, effects of parents’ lives on children, religious beliefs and behaviors of youth, and demographic transitions among the Amish. She is also principal investigator for the Young Adult Survey of the National Longitudinal Study of Youth. Dr. Cooksey has a B.A. in human sciences from Oxford University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology from Brown University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

MARCIE CYNAMON (Speaker) is director of the Division of Health Interview Statistics at the National Center for Health Statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The Division plans and executes the National Health Interview Survey and related projects. Her primary area of expertise is health survey research methods.

HOLLY FOSTER (Speaker) is an associate professor in the Department of Sociology at Texas A&M University and a current visiting scholar at the American Bar Foundation. Her main areas of research are on parental incarceration effects on children, children’s exposure to violence, and women’s imprisonment. She co-organized the 2013 White House conference on parental incarceration in the United States, sponsored by the National Science Foundation. She has published research on the effects of parental incarceration in the Annual Review of Sociology, Law & Society Review, Social Problems, Sociology of Education, Social Science Research, The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Sciences, and The Russell Sage Journal of the Social Sciences.

AMANDA GELLER (Speaker) is a clinical associate professor of sociology at New York University, where she is also an affiliate of the Population Center and director of the MA Program in Applied Quantitative Research. Her research examines the interactions between criminal justice policy and practice, public health, and socioeconomic disadvantage and their joint effects on urban neighborhoods, families, and individuals. She focuses primarily on the administration of justice related to police–public interactions and on the role of incarceration in urban families. She also works on methodological issues for data collection related to both incarceration and police–public interactions. She has a B.S. in operations research and industrial engineering and an M.S. in engineering from Cornell University, and a Ph.D. in social policy analysis from Columbia University.

WAYNE GILES (Speaker) is director of the Division of Population Health at the National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. His work has included studies examining the prevalence of hypertension in Africa, clinical trials evaluating the effectiveness of cholesterol-lowering agents, and studies examining racial differences in the incidence of stroke. He currently directs research and programmatic activities in a number of areas, including arthritis, aging, alcohol, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, prevention research, school health, and epilepsy. He has been the recipient of numerous awards, including the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s Charles C. Shepard Award in Assessment and Epidemiology and the Jeffrey P. Koplan Award. He has a B.A. in biology from Washington University, an

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

M.S. in epidemiology from the University of Maryland, and an M.D. from Washington University.

JOHN HAGAN (Speaker) is the John D. MacArthur professor of sociology and law at Northwestern University and codirector of the Center on Law & Globalization at the American Bar Foundation. He is the author of Who Are the Criminals? The Politics of Crime Policy from the Age of Roosevelt to the Age of Reagan and Iraq and the Crimes of Aggressive War. He co-organized the 2013 White House Conference on parental incarceration in the United States, funded by the National Science Foundation. He is a recipient of the Stockholm Prize in criminology, the Harry Kalven Prize from the Law & Society Association, and the Cesare Beccaria Gold Medal from the German Society of Criminology.

ART HUGHES (Speaker) is a mathematical statistician at the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. He has over 30 years of experience in survey design and methodological and epidemiological studies related to substance use and associated behaviors. He is currently overseeing state and substate analysis and reporting activities on the National Survey on Drug Use and Health. Previously, he was chief of the Epidemiology Research Branch at the National Institute on Drug Abuse and a mathematical statistician at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. He has a B.S. in mathematics from Morgan State University and an M.S. in mathematics from Howard University.

DAVID JOHNSON (Speaker) is deputy director of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics and research professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He has worked widely throughout the federal statistical system, including his most recent position as chief economist in the Bureau of Economic Analysis. His research focuses on inequality and poverty measurement, equivalence scale estimation, and consumption. Dr. Johnson has a B.S. in economics and mathematics from the University of Puget Sound and a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Minnesota.

CANDACE KRUTTSCHNITT (Member, Steering Committee) is professor of sociology at the University of Toronto. Previously, she was on the faculty of the University of Minnesota and a visiting fellow at the University of Helsinki, Cambridge University, the Vrije University Amsterdam, and the Netherlands Institute for the Study of Crime and Law Enforcement. She has published widely on women’s imprisonment, gender and crime, and victimization. Her current research encompasses work on female offenders and comparative penology. She is a former president of the American Society of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

Criminology. Dr. Kruttschnitt has a B.A. in criminology from the University of California–Berkeley and a Ph.D. in sociology from Yale University.

JOHN LAUB (Member, Steering Committee) is a distinguished university professor in the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Previously, he served as the director of the National Institute of Justice at the Department of Justice—a Senate-confirmed presidential appointment. His areas of research include crime and the life course, crime and public policy, and the history of criminology. He is a fellow of the American Society of Criminology and a past president of the American Society of Criminology. He is a recipient of the Edwin H. Sutherland Award from the American Society of Criminology and (with Robert Sampson) of the Stockholm Prize in criminology research on how and why offenders stop offending. Two books he has co-authored with Robert Sampson—Crime in the Making: Pathways and Turning Points Through Life, and Shared Beginnings, Divergent Lives: Delinquent Boys to Age 70—have won several major awards. He has a B.A. in criminal justice from the University of Illinois at Chicago and an M.A. and a Ph.D. from the School of Criminal Justice at the State University of New York at Albany.

JAMES LYNCH (Speaker) is professor and chair of the Department of Criminology and Criminal Justice at the University of Maryland. Prior to this position, he served as the director of the Bureau of Justice Statistics of the U.S. Department of Justice. Previously, he was a distinguished professor in the Department of Criminal Justice at John Jay College, City University of New York chair, and a professor in the Department of Justice, Law and Society at American University. His research focuses on victim surveys, victimization risk, the role of coercion in social control, and crime statistics. He has published several books and numerous articles dealing with crime statistics. He is president-elect of the American Society of Criminology and served on the Committee on Law and Justice Statistics of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Lynch has a B.A. from Wesleyan University and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Chicago.

WENDY MANNING (Chair, Steering Committee) is the director of the Center for Family and Demographic Research and codirector for the National Center for Family & Marriage Research (NCFMR). As a family demographer, her research examines how family members define and understand their obligations to each other in an era of increasingly diverse and complex family relationships. She cochaired the 2012 NCMFR Measuring Incarceration in Household Surveys Invitational Forum, which brought together leading scholars, federal data providers, and policy makers to discuss the rise in mass incarceration in the United States, its effects on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

the well-being of individuals and families, and how to capture and measure the incarceration experience in household surveys. Her work has examined the meaning of cohabitation with her work on the measurement of cohabitation, fertility in cohabiting unions, the stability of cohabiting unions, transitions to marriage, and implications of cohabitation for adult and child well-being. She has a B.A., an M.S., and a Ph.D. in sociology, all from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

GLENN E. MARTIN (Speaker) is the founder of JustLeadershipUSA, an organization that empowers people most affected by incarceration to drive policy reform and is dedicated to cutting the U.S. correctional population in half by 2030. He is a national leader and criminal justice reform advocate who spent 6 years in New York State prisons. Previously, he served as vice president of public affairs at The Fortune Society and as codirector of the National HIRE Network at the Legal Action Center. He is cofounder of the Education from the Inside Out Coalition. He has been an Echoing Green Fellow, an America’s Leaders of Change National Urban Fellow, and a member of the governing boards of the College and Community Fellowship, Million Hoodies, and the California Partnership for Safe Communities. He serves on many national boards, including Governor Cuomo’s Reentry and Reintegration Council, the advisory board of the Vera Institute’s Public Health and Mass Incarceration Initiative, the National Network for Safe Communities, the Executive Session on Community Corrections at Harvard University, and the Global Advisory Council of Cornerstone Capital Group. He was named on the 2015 Root 100 list of most influential African Americans. He regularly contributes his expertise to national news outlets such as MSNBC, Fox News, CNN, Al Jazeera, and CSPAN.

MICHAEL MASSOGLIA (Speaker) is a Romnes Professor of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he is also a Vilas associate of the College of Letters and Sciences and serves as the director of the Center for Law, Society, & Justice. His research focuses on the social consequences of the expansion of the penal system, the relationship between the use of legal controls and demographic change in the United States, and patterns and consequences of criminal behavior over the life course He is an award-winning instructor who teaches classes on criminology, delinquency, and deviance. Dr. Massoglia has a Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota.

ROSS MATSUEDA (Speaker) is the Blumstein-Jordan endowed professor of sociology at the University of Washington, where he was previously associate chair of the Department of Sociology and associate director of the Center for Statistics and the Social Sciences. He previously held faculty positions at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and at the University of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

Iowa, where he was a professor, chair of the Department of Sociology, and founding director of the Center for Criminology and Socio-Legal Studies His research has focused on classical theories of crime, such as differential association, social control, and labeling. He has also examined the implications of rational choice theories and the theories about crime. His current research includes a study of neighborhood social capital and codes of violence, a study of life course trajectories of substance use and crime, a study of rational choice and deterrence (using panel data from the Denver Youth Survey), and a study of collective action and political protest in Seattle and Leizpig, Germany. Dr. Matsueda has a Ph.D. from the University of California–Santa Barbara.

DANIEL NAGIN (Speaker) is the Teresa and H. John Heinz III university professor of public policy and statistics at Carnegie Mellon University and serves as the Associate Dean of Faculty of the university’s Heinz School Public Policy and Management. He previously served as Deputy Secretary for Fiscal Policy and Analysis in the Pennsylvania Department of Revenue. His research focuses on the evolution of criminal and antisocial behaviors over the life course, the deterrent effect of criminal and non-criminal penalties on illegal behaviors, and the development of statistical methods for analyzing longitudinal data. He is an elected fellow of the American Society of Criminology, the American Society for the Advancement of Science, and the American Academy of Political and Social Science. He is a recipient of the American Society of Criminology’s Edwin H. Sutherland Award and of the Stockholm Prize in Criminology. He has a Ph.D. from what is now the Heinz School of Public Policy and Management of Carnegie Mellon University.

EVELYN PATTERSON (Speaker) is assistant professor of sociology at Vanderbilt University. She is also a health policy associate in the Center for Health Policy at Meharry Medical College. She was previously assistant professor of crime, law and justice, sociology, and demography at Pennsylvania State University. She has received awards from the American Sociological Association and the Population Association of America. She has published widely on sentencing policies, health and mortality, and measurement issues in correctional data. Dr. Patterson is the recipient of awards from the American Sociological Association and the Population Association of America. She has an M.A. in demography and a joint Ph.D. in criminology and demography from the University of Pennsylvania.

RUTH PETERSON (Member, Steering Committee) is professor emerita of sociology at Ohio State University and former director and a faculty retiree pf the university’s Criminal Justice Research Center (CJRC). She is the co-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

organizer of the CJRC’s Racial Democracy, Crime, and Justice-Network and its Crime and Justice Summer Research Institute: Broadening Perspectives and Participation and a member of CJRC’s Spatial Crime Research Working Group. She currently serves as a member of the Committee on National Statistics and vice-chair of the Committee on Law and Justice at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine. Her research focuses on community conditions and crime, racial and ethnic inequality in patterns of crime, and the consequences of criminal justice policies for racially and ethnically distinct communities. She is currently serving as president of the American Society of Criminology. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin.

KATHRYN PORTER (Speaker) is director of the Division of Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (DHANES) at the National Center for Health Statistics. In that capacity, she is responsible for managing the planning and implementation of the ongoing National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey program and oversees the overall analytic research activities for the survey. She is also a captain in the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corp and a former officer in the Epidemic Intelligence Service. She serves as a medical officer in the Operations Branch of DHANES. She is a member of the American Medical Association, the American Public Health Association, and the American College of Preventive Medicine. Dr. Porter is board certified in preventive medicine and public health and is a fellow of the American College of Preventive Medicine. She has an M.S. in preventive medicine and epidemiology from the University of Maryland and an M.D. from the Medical College of Virginia.

JOSIAH RICH (Member, Steering Committee) is professor of medicine and epidemiology at the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University and attending physician at the Miriam Hospital, where he is also the cofounder and director of the Center for Prisoner Health and Human Rights at the hospital’s Immunology Center. His work focuses on infectious diseases and addiction, and he has advocated for public health policy changes to improve the health of people with addiction, including increasing drug treatment for the incarcerated and formerly incarcerated populations. He has published widely on the overlap between infectious diseases, addictions, and incarceration. He is the principal investigator of three major studies focused on incarcerated populations. He is a cofounder of the nationwide Collaboration in HIV in Corrections Initiative of the Centers for AIDS Research. Dr. Rich has advocated for public health policy changes to improve the health of people with addiction, including improving legal access to sterile syringes and increasing drug treatment for the incarcerated and formerly

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

incarcerated populations. He has an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health and an M.D. from the University of Massachusetts.

MICHAEL SCHOBER (Member, Steering Committee) is professor of psychology at the New School for Social Research in New York City. His research deals with questions that cross the lines between psychology, linguistics, human–computer interaction, music, public opinion research, and design. Dr. Schober’s recent and ongoing studies include work on conversational language use and perspective-taking, how differently people can conceive of what they are discussing despite apparent understanding, how partners with differing abilities take each other into account, conceptual misalignment in survey interview and testing interactions, how IQ testers can influence responses and scores, how survey interviewing techniques affect response accuracy, how interacting with interviewing systems that are more and less human-like affects survey respondents’ willingness to disclose personal information, comprehension of natural speech (including disfluencies and stutters), interface design and interaction, and how attention to respondent disfluencies and other “paradata” can be useful for interviewing interfaces. He has a Ph.D. in psychology from Stanford University.

CHRISTOPHER UGGEN (Speaker) is Martindale Chair and Distinguished McKnight Professor of Sociology and Law at the University of Minnesota. He studies crime, law, and deviance. He co-wrote Locked Out: Felon Disenfranchisement and American Democracy s and has written extensively on felon voting, work and crime, and harassment and discrimination and is frequently cited in the media. His research, teaching, and advising interests include crime and punishment, social and political inequality, and law and society. Current projects include a comparative study of reentry from different types of institutions, employment discrimination and criminal records, crime and justice after genocide, and the health effects of incarceration. He has a B.A. in criminal justice and an M.S. and a Ph.D. in sociology, all from the University of Wisconsin.

EMILY WANG (Member, Steering Committee) is an associate professor at the Yale School of Medicine and co-founder of the Transitions Clinic Network, a national network of medical homes for individuals with chronic diseases recently released from prison. Her research focuses on promoting health equity for vulnerable populations, especially individuals with a history of incarceration, through both prison- and community-based interventions. She works in training former prisoners to become community health workers and in training researchers through community-based participatory research methods. She is cofounder of the Transitions Clinic Network, a consortium of 15 community health centers nationwide dedicated to car-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×

ing for recently released prisoners and defining best practices for the health care of individuals leaving prison. In 2012 the Transitions Clinic Network was awarded the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Innovation Award to provide care to over 2,000 high-risk, high-cost patients returning from prison and to train and employ former prisoners as community health workers. Dr. Wang has a B.A. from Harvard University, an M.A. from the University of California–San Francisco, and an M.D. from Duke University.

CHRISTOPHER WILDEMAN (Member, Steering Committee) is an associate professor of policy analysis and management in the College of Human Ecology at Cornell University, where he is also a faculty fellow at the Bronfenbrenner Center for Translational Research, the Center for the Study of Inequality, Court-Kay-Bauer Residence Hall, and the Cornell Population Center. He has been a visiting fellow at the Bureau of Justice Statistics. Previously, he was on the faculty at the Center for Research on Inequalities and the Life Course and the Institution for Social and Policy Studies, both at Yale University. He was also codirector of the New Haven Branch of the Scholars Strategy Network. His research and teaching interests revolve around the consequences of mass imprisonment for inequality, with emphasis on families, health, and children. Dr. Wildeman is a recipient of the Ruth Shonle Cavan Young Scholar Award from the American Society of Criminology. He has an M.A. and a Ph.D. in sociology and demography from Princeton University.

TING YAN (Speaker) is a senior survey methodologist at Westat and an adjunct faculty member at the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland and at the Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Michigan. Her work in the field of survey research focuses on questionnaire design, question evaluation, paradata, and evaluation of data quality. She has a Ph.D. in survey methodology from the Joint Program in Survey Methodology at the University of Maryland.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page81
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page82
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page83
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page84
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page85
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page88
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page89
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Steering Committee Members and Speakers." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24633.
×
Page90
Next: Committee on National Statistics »
Improving Collection of Indicators of Criminal Justice System Involvement in Population Health Data Programs: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $58.00 Buy Ebook | $46.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

In the U.S. criminal justice system in 2014, an estimated 2.2 million people were in incarcerated or under correctional supervision on any given day, and another 4.7 million were under community supervision, such as probation or parole. Among all U.S. adults, 1 in 31 is involved with the criminal justice system, many of them having had recurring encounters.

The ability to measure the effects of criminal justice involvement and incarceration on health and health disparities has been a challenge, due largely to limited and inconsistent measures on criminal justice involvement and any data on incarceration in health data collections. The presence of a myriad of confounding factors, such as socioeconomic status and childhood disadvantage, also makes it hard to isolate and identify a causal relationship between criminal justice involvement and health. The Bureau of Justice Statistics collects periodic health data on the people who are incarcerated at any given time, but few national-level surveys have captured criminal justice system involvement for people previously involved in the system or those under community supervision—nor have they collected systematic data on the effects that go beyond the incarcerated individuals themselves.

In March 2016 the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine held a workshop meant to assist the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation (ASPE) and Office of the Minority Health (OMH) in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services in identifying measures of criminal justice involvement that will further their understanding of the socioeconomic determinants of health. Participants investigated the feasibility of collecting criminal justice experience data with national household-based health surveys. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!