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Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing (2017)

Chapter:Appendix A: Volcano Databases

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Volcano Databases." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24650.
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Appendix A

Volcano Databases

Descriptions of Volcanoes and Eruption Histories:

  • The Smithsonian Global Volcano Program (Volcanoes of the World) has reports, eruption history, deformation episodes, and general geologic information for Holocene active volcanoes. Satellite-based SO2 emission data are now included. See http://volcano.si.edu/search_volcano.cfm.
  • The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration has a database of significant volcanic eruptions with Volcano Explosivity Index (VEI), number of fatalities, and damage estimates, as well as a database of volcanic ash advisories. See https://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/hazard/volcano.shtml.
  • LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) has information on Quaternary active volcanoes, including volcano type and eruptive history if known for VEI ≥4 eruptions. This database is part of VOGRIPA (Volcanic Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project). See http://www.bgs.ac.uk/vogripa/index.cfm.

Unrest Prior to Eruptions:

  • WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest, including instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emissions, and other parameters from observatories’ normal baselines. See http://www.wovodat.org.

Geophysical Data:

Geochemical, Gas, and Thermal Data:

  • IEDA (Interdisciplinary Earth System Alliance)/EarthChem provides geochemical information, including some volcanic gas data. The data are not linked to eruption data. See http://www.earthchem.org.
  • The GeoRoc (Geochemistry of Rocks of the Oceans and Continents) database contains geochemical information. See http://georoc.mpch-mainz.gwdg.de/georoc.
  • The Multi-Satellite Volcanic Sulfur Dioxide L4 Long-Term Global Database V2 provides data on volcanic SO2 emissions derived from ultraviolet satellite
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Volcano Databases." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24650.
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  • measurements since October 1978. See ftp://measures.gsfc.nasa.gov/data/s4pa/SO2/MSVOLSO2L4.2.

  • MAGA (MApping GAs emissions) is a volcanic gas database focused on the Mediterranean region. See http://www.magadb.net.
  • The ASTER (Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer) Volcano Archive provides thermal and optical imagery for all of the world’s volcanoes. See http://ava.jpl.nasa.gov.
  • The MODVOLC algorithm provides a tool to find near-real-time thermal monitoring data from MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) sensors. See http://modis.higp.hawaii.edu/cgi-bin/modisnew.cgi.
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Volcano Databases." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24650.
×
Page113
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Volcano Databases." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24650.
×
Page114
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Volcanic eruptions are common, with more than 50 volcanic eruptions in the United States alone in the past 31 years. These eruptions can have devastating economic and social consequences, even at great distances from the volcano. Fortunately many eruptions are preceded by unrest that can be detected using ground, airborne, and spaceborne instruments. Data from these instruments, combined with basic understanding of how volcanoes work, form the basis for forecasting eruptions—where, when, how big, how long, and the consequences.

Accurate forecasts of the likelihood and magnitude of an eruption in a specified timeframe are rooted in a scientific understanding of the processes that govern the storage, ascent, and eruption of magma. Yet our understanding of volcanic systems is incomplete and biased by the limited number of volcanoes and eruption styles observed with advanced instrumentation. Volcanic Eruptions and Their Repose, Unrest, Precursors, and Timing identifies key science questions, research and observation priorities, and approaches for building a volcano science community capable of tackling them. This report presents goals for making major advances in volcano science.

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