National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidebook for Developing Ramp Control Facilities (2017)

Chapter: Appendix B - Initial and Recurring Costs

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Page 54
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Initial and Recurring Costs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guidebook for Developing Ramp Control Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24668.
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Page 54
Page 55
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Initial and Recurring Costs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guidebook for Developing Ramp Control Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24668.
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Page 55
Page 56
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B - Initial and Recurring Costs." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2017. Guidebook for Developing Ramp Control Facilities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/24668.
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Page 56

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Lessons Learned D-3 Administrative/Budget Administrative/Budget Lessons Learned Administrative Concerns Ensure ramp control activities help comply with an airport’s sustainability plan. Understand an airport’s vision to increase capacity and introduce new airlines. Lack of long-range planning for growth resulted in reactionary solutions to problems. When planning for the future, give serious consideration to identifying as many common-use gates as possible. Initial and Recurring Costs Consider working through all pros and cons (including cost/benefit analysis) of alternative ramp management options. Management No one ramp control solution exists. Ramp control decisions need to be made on a case-by-case basis—each airport/terminal area is different and has different needs and requirements. Collaboration is key to successful implementation. Ensure the FAA is involved throughout the consideration process. Interested stakeholders should be included in ramp-related decisions; forming an integrated team will help the airport develop the desired ramp control operation. Implementing ramp control is not the only solution to resolve/mitigate gate availability and ramp access way conflicts; there are potential procedural solutions that should be considered. Document the final agreement between the FAA and ramp control management. As airports have adopted “common-use” gates, the tendency is for the airport operator or their contractor to operate ramp control. Table D-4. Lessons learned—administrative/budget.

E-1 Airports with Ramp Control Table E-1 is an inventory of airports with non-FAA ramp control operations. Airports and the stakeholders performing their ramp control are listed by their FAA region. Subsequent pages provide airport diagrams of airports with ramp control (Figures E-1 to E-28). These may provide airport operators with insight to airports with similar characteristics (e.g., runway configuration, terminal layout, hub type). Additional airport diagrams can be found at http://www.faa.gov/airports/runway_safety/ diagrams/. A p p e n d i x e

E-2 Guidebook for developing Ramp Control Facilities Table E-1. Inventory of airports with non-FAA ramp control. Airports (Listed by FAA Region) Confirmed to have Non-FAA Ramp Control Eastern Region EWR (Newark)—United Airlines (UAL); Port Authority of New York/New Jersey (PANYNJ) IAD (Dulles, VA)— Metropolitan Washington Airports Authority (MWAA) JFK (New York)—American Airlines (AAL); Delta Air Lines (DAL); JetBlue Airways; PANYNJ LGA (New York)—AAL; DAL; UAL; Airway Services PHL (Philadelphia)—AAL; PHL Airport Great Lakes Region CLE (Cleveland)—UAL; Service Air DTW (Detroit)—DAL; DTW Airport; Dynamic Science IND (Indianapolis)—Federal Express (FDX) MSP (Minneapolis)—DAL ORD (Chicago)—UAL; AAL; Signature New England Region BOS (Boston)—DAL Northwest Mountain Region DEN (Denver)—UAL; DEN Department of Aviation SEA (Seattle)—DAL; Robinson Aviation SLC (Salt Lake City)—DAL Southern Region ATL (Atlanta)—DAL; TBI CLT (Charlotte)—AAL FLL (Ft Lauderdale)— Robinson Aviation MCO (Orlando)—DAL MEM (Memphis) – FDX MIA (Miami)—AAL; Miami- Dade Department of Aviation RDU (Raleigh )—TBI Southwest Region DFW (Dallas)—AAL; DFW Airport IAH (Houston)—UAL Western Pacific Region LAS (Las Vegas)—Clark County Department of Aviation LAX (Los Angeles)—UAL; AAL; DAL PHX (Phoenix)—AAL SAN (San Diego)—SERCO SFO (San Francisco)—UAL; ASIG/AGI/TBI

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 167: Guidebook for Developing Ramp Control Facilities provides guidance to airport operators considering providing ramp control services. An accompanying

Ramp Control Decision Support Tool

assists users through most considerations before providing ramp control services, including facility requirements, staffing, training, and technology and other factors, allowing the user to determine the best way to move forward.

The Ramp Control Decision Support Tool is implemented in a sequence of HTML files and Javascript libraries that can be navigated using a web browser. The current version of the tool supports Google Chrome and Mozilla Firefox browsers.

In order to use the install and start the tool please use the following steps:

1. Copy the provided zip file with the tool to a local directory.

2. Unzip the contents of the zip file to this directory.

3. Open index.html file using either Google Chrome or Mozilla Firefox.

4. The welcome page provides a general overview of the tool.

5. Click on the Get Started button to start uisng the tool. This will lead to Step 1 questions.

6. Provide responses to questions included in Step 1 and when done click on the Next button.

7. Repeat for Steps 2 and 3.

8. When done answering the questions for all three steps click on Report to automatically generate a report with all provided answers.

9. The report can be printed by clicking on Print button.

Disclaimer: This software is offered as is, without warranty or promise of support of any kind either expressed or implied. Under no circumstance will the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine or the Transportation Research Board (collectively "TRB") be liable for any loss or damage caused by the installation or operation of this product. TRB makes no representation or warranty of any kind, expressed or implied, in fact or in law, including without limitation, the warranty of merchantability or the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose, and shall not in any case be liable for any consequential or special damages.

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