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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
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Appendix B

Speaker and Moderator Biographies

Greg Burel currently serves as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC’s) director of the Division of Strategic National Stockpile (DSNS). DSNS is a division of the Office of Public Health Preparedness and Response. Prior to his leadership at DSNS, Mr. Burel developed an extensive background in federal government service that began in 1982. In addition to CDC, his service includes management roles with increasing responsibility with the Internal Revenue Service, General Services Administration, and the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Mr. Burel was selected as a member of the Senior Executive Service and joined CDC in 2005. He was initially assigned as management officer for the newly created National Center for Public Health Informatics. In 2007, he assumed his current position. In this role, Mr. Burel directs the nation’s premier medical material preparedness and response organization charged with delivering critical medical assets to the site of a national emergency. He is a graduate of the Federal Executive Institute’s Leadership for a Democratic Society and the Harvard University John F. Kennedy School of Government National Preparedness Leadership Initiative. He has completed numerous courses in process improvement, contracting, finance, and incident command. Mr. Burel is a 2016 recipient of the Samuel J. Heyman Service to America Medal for Management Excellence. He is also an elected fellow of the National Academy of Public Administration. Mr. Burel holds a bachelor’s of business administration from Georgia State University.

Michele V. Davidson, R.Ph., is a senior manager, Pharmacy Technical Standards, Development and Policy, Government Relations with the Walgreen

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

Company, and is the immediate past chair of the Board of Trustees for the National Council of Prescription Drug Programs (NCPDP), an organization with which she has been involved for more than 15 years. In her current role at Walgreens, she ensures compliance with Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act standards throughout all business units. She engages and advises members of the government relations team and engages with stakeholders within and outside the company about pharmacy technical standards through direct participation in organizations such as NCPDP. Ms. Davidson served as co-chair of WG 11 (ePrescribing and Related Transactions) for 8 years and is the current lead of the ePrescribing Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategies task group. She is the 2014 recipient of NCPDP’s TIME (The Individual Member Excellence) Award. She is a member of the National Association of Chain Drug Stores, the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society, and the eHealth Initiative. She also serves as the NCPDP representative on the Pharmacy Health Information Technology Collaborative Coding Work Group and is its Accredited Standards Committee X12 representative. Ms. Davidson graduated from the University of Florida with a B.S. in pharmacy.

Larry M. Glasscock currently serves as senior vice president, Global Accounts, for MNX Global Logistics. His current focus and responsibilities include the creation of unique, customer-specific inventory management and distribution solutions through the formation and leverage of alliances, collaborative partnerships, and technology that benefits customers. Mr. Glasscock has more than 25 years of experience in executive leadership in expedited and specialized cargo transportation and distribution. He has demonstrated success in the development of response and support networks designed to serve customers in the life sciences and medical device and equipment segments. Beyond transportation, Mr. Glasscock has served as the senior operations executive for companies in telecommunications, data networks, gaming, and logistics software. Prior to joining MNX, Mr. Glasscock most recently served as interim chief executive officer (CEO) of specialized construction companies operating as Surge Solutions Group; as the CEO of Blue Dog Gaming; and as the chief of operations of Evercom Systems. Mr. Glasscock is a former board member of the Expedited and Logistics Association and is a member of the Turnaround Management Association. He completed his undergraduate education at Rhodes College.

Allison Neale, M.P.P., has worked in global health, corporate social responsibility, and human rights for nearly two decades. Since 2008, Ms. Neale has worked in Henry Schein’s Office of the Chairman. She currently serves as the director of public policy and focuses primarily on the areas of global health, public policy, corporate social responsibility, and communications.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

As part of her current role, Ms. Neale leads several major public–private partnerships in global health. Her experience in this area includes co-founding the Alpha Omega–Henry Schein Cares Holocaust Survivor Oral Health Program, a program that provides free dental care to Holocaust survivors in need across North America, and co-directing Henry Schein’s engagement as the private-sector lead of the Pandemic Supply Chain Network, an initiative aimed at enhancing global pandemic preparedness and relief efforts. Ms. Neale also represents Henry Schein on several global private-sector initiatives in global health: the Steering Committee of the Global Health Security Agenda Private Sector Roundtable, the Tent Partnership for Refugees, and various engagements with the World Economic Forum. Prior to joining Team Schein, Ms. Neale served as the senior advocacy associate at Global Health Strategies, a global health consulting company; the international human rights officer at the Jacob Blaustein Institute for the Advancement of Human Rights; the senior associate in the Strategic Planning Unit of the Office of the Secretary-General at the United Nations; and the research and investigations coordinator at Physicians for Human Rights. Ms. Neale received her bachelor’s degree magna cum laude in history from Tufts University. She received her master’s in public policy from Harvard University’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, with a focus on international human rights and conflict resolution, and was awarded the Pforzheimer Foundation Fellowship.

Brad Noé, M.B.A., is a global manager, Technical Resources, Hypodermic Business at Becton, Dickinson and Company (BD). Mr. Noé is responsible for flu and pandemic planning, clinical and technical support to the business, and training and education material development. As the International Organization for Standardization co-chair, he has worked on small-bore connectors development, including a revised Luer standard. In his 31 years of service at BD, his other assignments have included business development, management of conventional hypodermic business, the marketing and management of specialty products, and infusion devices. Prior to BD, Mr. Noé worked as a branch manager for Whittaker General Medicine (a medical distribution company, prior to its acquisition by McKesson Medical); as a sales representative for Deseret Medical and Johnson & Johnson; and as a certified paramedic in Pennsylvania for 8 years, where he was also an emergency medical technician instructor for 5 years. Mr. Noé received his B.A. from Roger Williams University and his executive M.B.A. from Rutgers University.

Tara O’Toole, M.D., M.P.H., is the senior fellow and executive vice president at In-Q-Tel (IQT), a private, nonprofit strategic investment firm that links the U.S. Intelligence Community and venture-backed, start-up firms

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

on the leading edge of technological innovation. IQT invests in start-up companies that have developed commercially viable products that will deliver novel and disruptive, ready-soon (within 36 months) technologies that could effectively address some of the nation’s most significant problems. Dr. O’Toole is leading a strategic IQT initiative to explore opportunities and risks likely to arise in the next decade as a result of advances in the biological sciences and biotechnologies, with a particular focus on the detection of and defense against biological attacks. From 2009 to 2013, Dr. O’Toole served as under secretary of science and technology (S&T) at the Department of Homeland Security (DHS), the principal advisor to the secretary of homeland security on matters related to science and technology. During her tenure, Dr. O’Toole established strong collaborations with the DHS’s operational components to ensure that research and development (R&D) projects addressed users’ top priority needs. High-profile “Apex Initiatives” pioneered new partnerships between S&T and DHS operations and successfully delivered innovative technologies to meet DHS’s urgent operational needs, including the use of advanced, “Big Data” analytics by Immigration Control and Enforcement and Customs and Border Protection. Dr. O’Toole also established a rigorous and transparent performance review process to evaluate S&T’s diverse portfolio of R&D projects that ranged from biodefense to explosives detection, cybersecurity, and the protection of first responders. To make the most of a limited budget and expansive scope of responsibilities, S&T created a technology foraging initiative, designed to scan the horizon of existing technologies and adapt or adopt technologies others had already invested in, thereby greatly increasing return on investment and speeding transition to field use. Under Dr. O’Toole’s leadership, S&T created DHS’s first division of cybersecurity research, a division devoted to delivering technologies to first responders, and a systems engineering division. She won approval and funding from the administration and Congress to begin construction of an urgently needed, long-delayed high-containment laboratory for emergent and contagious animal diseases. In 2013, a time of severe, widespread budget cuts, Congress appropriated a 25 percent increase in S&T’s budget, affirming S&T’s value to homeland security. Technologies delivered to use during her tenure covered the broad range of DHS missions.

In the decade before becoming under secretary, Dr. O’Toole founded and directed two university-based think tanks devoted to civilian biodefense. She was a professor of public health and director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Civilian Biodefense Studies at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, which was the first academic center devoted to biosecurity policy and practices and played a major role in defining the nature and consequences of major biological threats, both natural and deliberate. In 2003, the center and its staff became affiliated with the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

University of Pittsburgh, while remaining based in Baltimore. Dr. O’Toole was the chief executive officer and director of the Center for Biosecurity of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and a professor of medicine and public health at the University of Pittsburgh. Today the center, renamed the Center for Health Security and incorporated into the Johns Hopkins system, is a recognized leader in the fields of biosecurity and mass casualty preparation and response. Its work has and continues to inform many U.S. government and international policies and practices. From 1994 to 1998, Dr. O’Toole served in President Clinton’s administration as assistant secretary for environment safety and health in the Department of Energy (DOE). In that role, she oversaw vulnerability assessments of the chemical and fissile materials that had been stored at the U.S. nuclear weapons complex or stranded in place with the cessation of nuclear weapons production. She worked to establish a more efficient and effective approach to workplace and environmental safety at DOE sites; was the government lead of a comprehensive study of Cold War experiments involving human exposure to radiation; and led the U.S. delegation to Russia to begin joint studies of pollution left in the wake of Soviet nuclear weapons production. From 1989 to 1993, Dr. O’Toole was a senior analyst at the congressional Office of Technology Assessment (OTA). Before joining OTA, she practiced internal medicine in community health centers in east Baltimore as part of the U.S. Public Health Service. Dr. O’Toole is a past board chair of the Federation of American Scientists and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. She received her B.A. from Vassar College, an M.P.H. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and an M.D. from the George Washington University School of Medicine. She is board certified in internal medicine and occupational and environmental medicine.

Paul E. Petersen, Pharm.D., is the director of the Tennessee Department of Health’s Emergency Preparedness Program. He serves as lead for Tennessee’s federally funded Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response Healthcare Preparedness and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Public Health Emergency Preparedness cooperative agreements. Dr. Petersen serves as lead in Tennessee’s response to all public health and medical emergencies. He is an active member of several professional associations, including the Nashville Area Pharmacists Association, the Tennessee Pharmacists Association, and the Tennessee Public Health Association. He earned his doctorate of pharmacy at the University of the Pacific College of Pharmacy. Dr. Petersen completed his postgraduate pharmacy practice residency at Saint Thomas Hospital in Nashville, where he also served as the clinical operating room pharmacist prior to his move to state government.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

Irwin Redlener, M.D., is a clinical professor of health policy and management and pediatrics at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health, as well as the director of the university’s National Center for Disaster Preparedness within the Earth Institute. He is also the co-founder and president of the Children’s Health Fund. Dr. Redlener is a recognized national leader in disaster preparedness and the public health ramifications of terrorism and large-scale catastrophic events. He and his team have developed major programs to enhance public health and health systems readiness with respect to disasters. He has written and spoken widely on the response to Hurricane Katrina, U.S. readiness for pandemics, and the concerns of children as potential targets of terrorism. Dr. Redlener has also had more than three decades of experience providing health care to medically underserved children in rural and urban communities throughout the United States. As founder and president of the Children’s Health Fund, he is a renowned advocate for access to health care for all children. Dr. Redlener served as a principal developer and the president of the new Children’s Hospital at Montefiore in the Bronx. He has been a formal and informal adviser to the president and various cabinet members since 1993. Over the past few years, he has worked with key members of Congress on disaster preparedness and child health access. In 1993 and 1994, Dr. Redlener served as the special consultant to the National Health Reform Task Force for the Clinton White House. He has taught medical students in rural Honduras and has led or assisted in international disaster relief in Central America and Africa. Dr. Redlener has also created a series of direct medical relief programs and public health initiatives in the Gulf region ravaged by Hurricane Katrina. Dr. Redlener received his M.D. from the University of Miami in 1969 and his B.A. in 1964 from Hofstra University.

Albert J. Romanosky, M.D., Ph.D., came to the Maryland Department of Health 14 years ago after a full-time practice in emergency medicine. He is currently the medical director and state emergency preparedness coordinator in the department’s Office of Preparedness and Response. As a member of the lead agency for Emergency Support Function #8: Public Health and Medical, Dr. Romanosky has actively supported state health department emergency preparedness planning and response for public health emergencies. He has been involved with several recognized achievements, including (1) development of the Pan Flu Continuity of Operations Task Force, which brings together representatives of private critical infrastructure organizations in a public–private partnership to foster collaborative and cooperative emergency preparedness planning and response (this endeavor is considered a national best practice as a result of innovative aspects of this workgroup); (2) recipient of the American Red Cross Community Service Award for the Mid-Atlantic Region for overseeing the design and conduct

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

of the 2007 and 2008 Maryland Statewide Pandemic Influenza Exercises, 3-day statewide exercises involving full and modified functional activities of more than 250 federal, state, local, and private agencies and organizations with participation of more than 4,000 participants; and (3) co-author of the Maryland State Pandemic Influenza Operational Plan for Critical Infrastructure, Key Resources, and Critical Manufacturing, which received the highest evaluation score by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reviewers. Dr. Romanosky holds a Ph.D. in human physiology from The Pennsylvania State University and an M.D. from Louisiana State University. He is board certified in internal, emergency, and disaster medicine. He is one of a few physicians who have been board certified in the new field of disaster medicine and has recently been elected to the American Board of Disaster Medicine. After completing an internal medicine residency at the University of Maryland Medical System, he worked in several regional emergency departments. In addition, Dr. Romanosky has served as a jurisdictional medical director; an assistant medical director for one of the nation’s first tactical emergency medical services teams; a weapons of mass destruction and emergency response subject-matter expert and instructor for the Department of State’s Anti-Terrorism Assistance Program; and an instructor in advanced cardiac life support, advanced trauma life support, and pediatric life support programs. Dr. Romanosky is currently an instructor in the Department of Pediatric Surgery at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Lewis Rubinson, M.D., Ph.D., FCCP, is an associate professor of medicine at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, an assistant chief medical officer for critical care of the University of Maryland Medical Center, and the director of clinical research for the Critical Care Resuscitation Unit (CCRU) at the R. Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center. CCRU is the first unit of its kind in the United States and was designed to mimic shock trauma’s widely revered trauma resuscitation unit capabilities for non-trauma critically ill patients with time-sensitive specialty care needs. Now entering its fourth year, CCRU has changed the paradigm of how non-trauma critically ill patients at outside hospitals with time-sensitive needs are transferred for university specialty care and are initially resuscitated at the University of Maryland. Dr. Rubinson is also a leader in mass critical care preparedness and has published and lectured extensively on emergency mass critical care, managing severe contagious respiratory infections during outbreaks, and mass casualty mechanical ventilation. In addition, Dr. Rubinson has been an international proponent and leader for establishing systems and processes to ensure key clinically relevant questions are answered during evolving public health emergencies. Dr. Rubinson was the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) lead for the largest

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

critical care registry established during the 2009 influenza pandemic. He is currently the co-chairperson of the Protocol Committee for the U.S. Critical Illness and Injury Trials Group Program in Public Health Preparedness Food and Drug Administration and Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority contract for rapid clinical learning during public health emergencies. Prior to joining the University of Maryland, Dr. Rubinson was the acting chief medical officer of the National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) in the Office of Emergency Management within the HHS Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response. In that role, and previously as deputy chief medical officer, he had extensive experience with medical cache development and assessment. Dr. Rubinson served as the federal chief medical officer in the HHS Secretary’s Operation Center for major events such as Superstorm Sandy. Dr. Rubinson also has extensive field experience and has deployed on numerous occasions for NDMS as a front-line clinician and as the medical lead for the Incident Response Coordination Team. Dr. Rubinson was a clinician consultant for the World Health Organization and the clinical lead at the Kenema Government Hospital in Sierra Leone in 2014. Dr. Rubinson received his M.D. from the Northwestern University Medical School and completed a residency in internal medicine at the University of California, San Francisco. He completed a pulmonary and critical care medicine fellowship at Johns Hopkins University, where he also received a Ph.D. in clinical investigation at the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Skip Skivington, M.B.A., has worked at Kaiser Permanente (KP) for more than 16 years and is currently the vice president, Healthcare Continuity & Support Services, based at the national headquarters in Oakland, California. Mr. Skivington is responsible for the executive oversight of KP’s Supplier Diversity, Nutritional Services, Corporate Meeting Services, Materials Management, Product Recall, Vendor Authorization, and Healthcare Continuity Management programs. Since 2000, Mr. Skivington has been responsible for the implementation of a formal health care continuity management program throughout KP. In addition to directing this formal planning process, and immediately following the anthrax attacks in October 2001, Mr. Skivington formed and now directs KP’s threat assessment program consisting of an executive oversight council and functional working groups in the disciplines of clinical (physicians, nursing, and laboratories), facilities, community linkages, people, legal, communications and education, supply chain, and public policy. Mr. Skivington is a member of the State of California Joint Advisory Committee for terrorism preparedness and the American Health Insurance Plans’ Disaster Readiness Committee. Mr. Skivington is also a member of the Conference Board’s Business Continuity and Crisis Management Council as well as the U.S. Healthcare Sector Critical Infra-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

structure Council. He is a frequent speaker on medical preparedness in the event of a terrorist attack. Following Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, Mr. Skivington led two KP medical response teams consisting of physicians, nurses, and mental health providers to the Gulf Region at the request of the U.S. Surgeon General and the State of California. Mr. Skivington was the project administrator for the U.S. government’s Hospital Incident Command System (HICS) Revision IV Project. HICS IV was updated on behalf of the government through a national working group representing hospitals throughout the country, along with input from national agencies, including the American Hospital Association, the Federal Emergency Management Agency, the Joint Commission, the Department of Health and Human Services, and the Health Resources and Services Administration. Mr. Skivington holds both a B.A. in business administration and an M.B.A.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B Speaker and Moderator Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2018. Impact of the Global Medical Supply Chain on SNS Operations and Communications: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25149.
×
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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) established the Strategic National Stockpile (SNS) with a focus on procuring and managing medical countermeasures (MCM) designed to address chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear events and attacks by weapons of mass destruction. The stockpile is a repository of antibiotics, chemical antidotes, antitoxins, vaccines, antiviral drugs, and other medical materiel organized to respond to a spectrum of public health threats. Over time, the mission of the SNS has informally evolved to address other large-scale catastrophes, such as hurricanes or outbreaks of pandemic disease, and rare acute events, such as earthquakes or terror attacks. When disaster strikes, states can request deployment of SNS assets to augment resources available to state, local, tribal, or territorial public health agencies. CDC works with federal, state, and local health officials to identify and address their specific needs and, according to the stated mission of the SNS, ensure that the right resources reach the right place at the right time.

On August 28, 2017, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a workshop to explore the current state of the global medical supply chain as it relates to SNS assets, and the role of communications in mitigating supply chain risks and in enhancing the resilience of MCM distribution efforts. This publication summarizes the presentations and discussions from the workshop.

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