National Academies Press: OpenBook

Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy (2019)

Chapter: Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A - Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25433.
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A-1 Renewable Resources Opportunity Assessment Tool Introduction There are many renewable resources that may be beneficial for airports to consider, and it can be challenging to narrow down the possibilities to the most viable and promising projects. The checklists in this appendix are a preliminary scoring tool to help airport staff prioritize different types of renewable resource opportunities. The purpose of these assessments is not to make definitive judgements about feasibility or cost-effectiveness, but rather to act as a planning tool and framework for identifying the projects most likely to result in a meaningful impact on airport operating costs or environmental impacts. There may be additional motivations for completing projects, even those projects with a smaller impact. For example, a small demonstration project might have a modest financial impact but result in positive public relations or confirm a technology for broader implementation. To that end, this assessment is intended as a tool to help the planning process, and will provide the most value when supplemented with other considerations. Using This Assessment Tool This assessment tool has a series of checklists to help establish a priority level for each of the included renewable resources. These resources were selected due to their likelihood to be broadly applicable to a variety of airports and, in some cases, their occurrence at airports noted during the development of this guidebook. In general, the information needed to complete these assessments will be readily available to airport planning staff, though some aspects may require cross-department collaboration to obtain information on energy bills, waste streams, water consumption, or other key data. This tool semi-quantitatively scores each renewable resource’s potential for having a positive impact on airport operations. This is based on the premise that, in developing a Renewable Resources Strategy, many airports will have a mid- to long-term goal to substantially reduce the use of non-renewable resources. To that end, this tool will help to determine whether an airport has sufficient potential renewable resources to make a substantial impact. Those resources with only limited applicability will receive a lower priority than resources that can have a broader impact across the airport. Once the checklists are complete, airport staff can focus on more viable renewable resource opportunities and will have the key information necessary to further assess the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of the resources identified. For each resource, in addition to the assessment tool, there is a short resources section of further useful information. A P P E N D I X A Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists

A-2 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Note that this tool is not exhaustive, and there may be other viable renewable resource oppor- tunities for your airport. Please refer to relevant sections of the guidebook for information on other possible renewable resource opportunities. Users can add new resources to the tool by following the format of the existing checklists and assigning the relevant low, medium, and high priority thresholds for the technology being considered. Sources of Information This tool requires only basic information about an airport’s operations. Prior to completing the assessment, users should familiarize themselves with the airport’s energy and non-aircraft fuel consumption, waste disposal, and similar data. Often, these can be obtained in a sustain- ability report or from the facilities and engineering staff at the airport. Other useful tools include: • Satellite imagery or aerial photography (such as Google Earth or Bing Maps) for examining available areas on airport property • Airport Layout Plan and Airport Master Plan for determining if there are any future devel- opment areas on the airport property that is under consideration for a renewable resource project • Information from local FAA Airport District Office such as the results of a Federal Regulation 49 CFR Part 77 surfaces review and/or Terminal Instrument Procedures (TERPS) surfaces review • Results of relevant environmental reviews (e.g., National Environmental Protection Act- NEPA) related to land under consideration for renewable resources development In addition, each resources section lists additional resources that may assist in conducting this preliminary assessment. Renewable Resource Opportunity Prioritization Table This table provides a convenient place for airport planners to summarize the results of resource-specific assessments throughout this appendix. The Priority columns are based on the outcome of each resource-specific assessment, so planners can quickly see which renewable opportunities appear to be the most viable for their airport. There is also space in the table for custom notes about relevant opportunities (for example, noting a solar canopy for Parking Lot A, solar space and air heating for Hangars C and D, or that a roof-mounted solar PV array is low priority now, but should be considered for any new facility construction). Priority Renewable Opportunity Notes Hi Med Low Solar Space Heating Solar Hot Water Roof-Mounted Solar PV Ground-Mounted Solar PV Carport/Canopy-Mounted Solar PV Wind Turbine Waste Management

Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists A-3 Solar Space Heating Similar to the use of solar energy to heat domestic hot water, solar energy can also be used to provide space heating. Solar walls are a special type of solar collector system that involves adding a simple solar collector to the outside of a building wall, which generates heat that can be used to preheat a building’s air intake supply. These systems are more cost-effective for large facilities, such as hangars, and more aesthetically suited to non-public facing building faces. See the solar space heating assessment checklist. Solar Space Heating Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit* Instructions 1 Heating Fuel Consumption Mcf/year Determine natural gas consumed annually (from facility utility bills). 2 Area of Suitable Walls ft2 Determine walls suitable for adding a solar wall, which typically face south and are relatively free of obstructions such as windows, doors, or building attachments. For cost-effectiveness, walls must generally be at least 1,000 sq. ft each. 3 Fuel Savings Mcf/year Multiply Line 2 (Area of Suitable Walls) by 0.114, then divide by 1.037. 4 Percentage of Fuel Consumption % Divide Line 3 (Fuel Savings) by Line 1 (Fuel Consumption). High Priority Line 4 (Percentage of Fuel Consumption) offsets 20% or more of hangar(s) energy usage and there are no restrictions. Medium Priority Line 4 (Percentage of Fuel Consumption) offsets 6% to 19% of hangar(s) energy usage, there are some site restrictions, or both. Low Priority Line 4 (Percentage of Fuel Consumption) offsets less than 5% of hangar(s) energy usage, there are significant site restrictions, or both. *Mcf = thousand cubic feet

A-4 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Solar Hot Water Solar hot water systems convert sunlight into heat that can be transferred to a facility’s hot water system. In many cases, this heat is used to preheat domestic hot water for showers, rest- rooms, or similar uses. While many facilities do not directly measure the amount of hot water they consume, an initial estimate of hot water consumption can be determined using some simple rules, shown in the roof-mounted solar hot water assessment checklist. Roof-Mounted Solar Hot Water Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions 1 Daily Hot Water Use Gal/day Determine the average daily hot water consumption, which in airports is typically 1 gallon per day per passenger. 2 Rooftop Total Area ft 2 3 Solar Hot Water Production Gal/day Multiply Line 2 by 1.269 (a factor that accounts for typical irradiance and other conditions). 4 Solar Hot Water as a Fraction of Usage % Divide Line 3 (Production) by Line 1 (Usage) 5 Glare Requirements Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations comply with FAA glare requirements. 1) Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT)* 2) FAA glare analysis requirements (78 FR 63276)** 6 Located within Permitted Areas Y/N 7 Available Incentives Y/N Determine available incentives by consulting the State Policy Opportunity Tracker (https://spotforcleanenergy.org/) High Priority Y/N Line 4 (SHW Fraction) offsets 20% or more of airport hot water use and Lines 5-7 are all “Yes.” Medium Priority Y/N Line 4 (SHW Fraction) offsets 20% or more of airport hot water use and some of Lines 5 -7 are “Yes.” Low Priority Y/N Line 4 (SHW Fraction) offsets 20% or more of airport hot water use consumption or significant siting restrictions exist. * Sandia National Laboratories. “Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tool.” https://share.sandia.gov/phlux ** FAA. “Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports.” Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 205. 63276. October 23, 2013. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-23/pdf/2013-24729.pdf Use plans, aerial photography, and/or satellite images to estimate the roof area available for solar PV. Look for areas that are free of obstructions, especially if the roof has been or will soon be replaced. Note that the total roof area may include several buildings. Also consult ALP to ensure that building is not planned for removal or renovation inconsistent with a new solar project. Determine whether the proposed locations are within permitted areas (i.e., outside the Obstacle Free Zones, Runway Protection Zones, Runway Object Free Areas) based on the Airport Layout Plan. May require coordination with the FAA Airport District Office.

Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists A-5 Solar Photovoltaics Many facilities, including airports, are using solar PV to generate electricity, which reduces the airport’s electricity bills and environmental impact. The most visible aspect of a PV system is the PV array, which is made of modules that convert sunlight into electricity. These arrays can be installed on rooftops, on top of parking garages, on ground-mounted racks, or on canopies that are installed over parking lots or other surfaces. In some cases, PV can be integrated into build- ing facades or even installed on a floating frame, though this last configuration is not a common choice for airports (Figure A-1). Figure A-1. Examples of solar PV system mounting configurations. The following tables provide checklists to assess the priority level of roof-mounted, ground- mounted, and canopy/carport-mounted solar PV installation.

A-6 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Roof-Mounted Solar PV Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions 1 Airport Electricity Usage kWh Determine electricity consumed annually (from facility electric bills). 2 Total Rooftop Area ft2 Use plans, aerial photography, and/or satellite images to estimate the roof area available for solar PV. Look for areas that are free of obstructions, especially if the roof has been or will soon be replaced. Note that the total roof area may include several buildings. (Do not include roof areas already occupied by solar installations.) 3 Combined Rooftop System Capacity kWDC Divide Line 2 by 100. This accounts for how densely PV modules can typically be packed and the result is the peak power output of the PV system(s). 4 Rooftop Annual Electricity Generation kWh Multiply Line 3 by: • 1,500 for southern latitudes <35° (high sun) • 1,350 for central latitudes 35°- 40° (medium sun) • 1,200 for northern latitudes >40° (low sun) 5 PV Generation Percentage of Usage % Divide Line 4 (Generation) by Line 1 (Usage) 6 Glare Requirements Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations comply with FAA glare requirements. 1) Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT)* 2) FAA glare analysis requirements (78 FR 63276)** 7 Locations within Permitted Areas Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations are within permitted areas (i.e., outside the Obstacle Free Zones, Runway Protection Zones, Runway Object Free Areas) based on the Airport Layout Plan. May require coordination with the FAA Airport District Office. 8 Renewable Portfolio Standard Y/N Determine whether the state has a Renewable Portfolio Standard. Consult Figure A-2 in the Resources: Solar Photovoltaics section. States with a RPS are more likely to have favorable incentives. High Priority Y/N Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 20% or more of airport energy usage and Lines 6–8 are all “Yes.” Medium Priority Y/N Low Priority Y/N Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets less than 5% of airport energy consumption or significant siting restrictions exist. * Sandia National Laboratories. “Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tool.” https://share.sandia.gov/phlux ** FAA. “Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports.” Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 205. 63276. October 23, 2013. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-23/pdf/2013-24729.pdf Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 6% to 19% of airport energy usage and some of Lines 6-8 are “Yes.”

Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists A-7 Ground-Mounted PV Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions 1 Airport Electricity Usage kWh Determine electricity consumed annually (from facility electric bills). 2 Total Ground Area Available ft2 3 Combined Ground-MountedSystem Capacity kWDC Divide Line 2 by 100. This accounts for how densely PV modules can typically be packed and the result is the peak power output of the PV system(s). 4 Annual Electricity Generation kWh Multiply Line 3 by: • 1,500 for southern latitudes <35° (high sun) • 1,350 for central latitudes 35°-40° (medium sun) • 1,200 for northern latitudes >40° (low sun) 5 PV Generation Percentage of Usage % Divide Line 4 (Generation) by Line 1 (Usage) 6 Glare Requirements Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations comply with FAA glare requirements. 1) Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT)* 2) FAA glare analysis requirements (78 FR 63276)** 7 Locations within Permitted Areas Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations are within permitted areas (i.e., outside the Obstacle Free Zones, Runway Protection Zones, Runway Object Free Areas) based on the Airport Layout Plan. May require coordination with the FAA Airport District Office. 8 Renewable Portfolio Standard Y/N Determine whether the state has a Renewable Portfolio Standard. Consult Figure A-2 in the Resources: Solar Photovoltaics section. States with a RPS are more likely to have favorable incentives. High Priority Y/N Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 20% or more of airport energy usage and Lines 6–8 are all “Yes.” Medium Priority Y/N Low Priority Y/N * Sandia National Laboratories. “Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tool.” https://share.sandia.gov/phlux ** FAA. “Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports.” Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 205. 63276. October 23, 2013. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-23/pdf/2013-24729.pdf Use plans, aerial photography, and/or satellite images to estimate the area available for solar PV. Look for airport-owned areas that are located in permitted areas as shown on the ALP, free of obstructions and that do not appear to be in use for other airport current or future activities, such as fields or large mowed and landscaped areas. Also consider that FAA guidelines require minimizing wildlife impacts, so sites of known habitat or other sensitivities should be excluded. Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 6% to 19% of airport energy usage and some of Lines 6-8 are “Yes.” Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets less than 5% of airport energy consumption or significant siting restrictions exist.

A-8 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Canopy/Carport-Mounted PV Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions Airport Electricity Usage kWh Determine electricity consumed annually (from facility electric bills). Total Area Available ft2 Combined Canopy/Carport- Mounted System Capacity kWDC Divide Line 2 by 100. This accounts for how densely PV modules can typically be packed and the result is the peak power output of the PV system(s). Annual Electricity Generation kWh Multiply Line 3 by: • 1,500 for southern latitudes <35° (high sun) • 1,350 for central latitudes 35°-40° (medium sun) • 1,200 for northern latitudes >40° (low sun) PV Generation Percentage of Usage % Divide Line 4 (Generation) by Line 1 (Usage) Glare Requirements Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations comply with FAA glare requirements. 1) Solar Glare Hazard Analysis Tool (SGHAT)* 2) FAA glare analysis requirements (78 FR 63276)** Located within Permitted Areas Y/N Determine whether the proposed locations are within permitted areas (i.e., outside the Obstacle Free Zones, Runway Protection Zones, Runway Object Free Areas) based on the Airport Layout Plan. May require coordination with the FAA Airport District Office. 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Renewable Portfolio Standard Y/N Determine whether the state has a Renewable Portfolio Standard. Consult Figure A-2 in the Resources: Solar Photovoltaics section. States with a RPS are more likely to have favorable incentives. High Priority Y/N Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 20% or more of airport energy usage and Lines 6-8 are all “Yes.” Medium Priority Y/N Low Priority Y/N Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets less than 5% of airport energy consumption or significantsiting restrictions exist. * Sandia National Laboratories. “Solar Glare and Flux Mapping Tool.” https://share.sandia.gov/phlux ** FAA. “Interim Policy, FAA Review of Solar Energy System Projects on Federally Obligated Airports.” Federal Register Vol. 78, No. 205. 63276. October 23, 2013. https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2013-10-23/pdf/2013-24729.pdf Use plans, aerial photography, and/or satellite images to estimate the area available for solar PV. Look for areas that are used for parking, low storage, or other low-height activities(such as taxi stands, bus stations, and parking fee collection booths), especially if providing shade would be beneficial. Also check ALP to ensure that buildings are not planned for removal or renovations that would affect solar. Line 5 (PV Generation) offsets 6% to 19% of airport energy usage and some of Lines 6-8 are “Yes.”

Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists A-9 Resources: Solar Photovoltaics Figure A-2 shows the renewable portfolio standard and renewable portfolio goal policies for each participating U.S. state or territory, including the required renewable contribution (in per- centage of total or value of capacity) and the year by which to achieve the designated contribution. In addition, the following resources are available: State Policy Opportunity Tracker A state by state summary of available policies and incentives. https://spotforcleanenergy.org/ National Renewable Energy Laboratory PVWATTS PVWATTS is a simple online tool for calculating electricity generation for PV systems. http://pvwatts.nrel.gov/ Figure A-2. States with renewable portfolio standards. Source: U.S. Department of Energy and North Carolina Clean Energy Technology Center. “Detailed Summary Maps.” Accessed January 1, 2018. http://ncsolarcen-prod. s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Renewable-Portfolio-Standards.pdf.

A-10 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Wind Turbine While traditionally airports and wind turbines are not seen as compatible, if designed and planned properly, wind turbines can provide significant electricity generation as part of a sustainable energy portfolio (see Figure A-3 and the wind turbine assessment checklist). Of course, system performance is directly proportional to the site’s available wind resource, turbine rating, and hub height. Figure A-3. One hundred-kilowatt wind turbine in Vermont.

Renewable Resources Opportunity Identification Checklists A-11 Wind Turbine Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions 1 On Airport Property Site Location Y/N Determine whether there is a permitted on-airport property site location for a wind turbine. 2 Off Airport Property Site Location Y/N Determine whether there is a suitable site on airport-owned land remote from main terminals and runways. 3 Tallest Turbine Height Allowed Meters Determine the tallest turbine height allowed based on turbine location, FAA Airport Airspace Analysis website,* and other tools. 4 Height and Obstruction Requirements Y/N 5 Average Annual Wind Speed m/s Determine the annual average wind speed at the potential site location. Minimum 7 m/s at hub height required for a cost-effective turbine installation (see the Wind Exchange map++ website) 6 Turbine Hub Height m Use Wind Resource Map**** to determine height for turbine hub. 7 Total Acreage Available Acres Determine the total acreage available for wind turbines on airport-owned land. 8 Wind Turbine Power Density 750 kW/Acre Determine the power density (typically 0.75 MW of rated capacity per acre). 9 Potential System Capacity kW Multiply Line 7 (Acreage) by Line 8 (Density) to determine system capacity based on available space. 10 Wind Turbine Annual Energy Generation kWh Multiply Line 9 (System Capacity) by 2,190 (a 25% coincidence factor) 11 Airport Electricity Usage kWh Determine the amount of electricity consumed annually based on facility electric bills. 12 Turbine Production Percentage of Usage % Divide Line 10 (Generation) by Line 11 (Usage) High Priority Medium Priority Line 12 (Turbine Production) offsets 6% to 19% of airport energy consumption. Low Priority * FAA. “Obstruction Evaluation / Airport Airspace Analysis” https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external/portal.jsp ** FAA. “Wind Turbine FAQ.” April 2, 2018. https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external/searchAction.jsp?action=showWindTurbineFAQs *** FAA. “Notice Criteria Tool.” https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external/gisTools/gisAction.jsp?action=showNoNoticeRequiredToolForm FAA. “Wind Turbine Build Out.” https://oeaaa.faa.gov/oeaaa/external/gisTools/gisAction.jsp?action=showWtBuildOutToolForm **** Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy. “Wind Energy Maps and Data.” https://windexchange.energy.gov/maps-data Determine whether the site location complies with height and obstruction requirements. Refer to the Airport Layout Plan, FAA wind turbine FAQ** (for the appropriate forms), and to the FAA Notice Criteria Tool*** website and Wind Turbine Build Out Tool+ websites. Line 12 (Turbine Production) offsets 20% or more of airport annual energy consumption and there are no restrictions. Line 12 (Turbine Production) offsets less than 5% of airport energy consumption, significant siting restrictions exist, or both.

A-12 Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy Waste Management Innovative waste management strategies can be applied to a wide variety of challenges and can impact nearly any renewable resource project, and can range from implementing a simple recycling program to starting a complex holistic strategy that encompasses various waste streams from composting to water reclamation. The first step is to perform a waste audit to identify current waste collection and disposal processes and costs. The second step is to organize, catego- rize, and establish metrics for the different waste streams. The third and final step is to develop goals, objectives, and priorities. See the waste management assessment checklist. Waste Management Assessment Checklist Line # Metric Value Unit Instructions 1 Total Waste Production Ton/yr Determine annual total waste production based on airport waste management service bills. 2 Landfill Waste Ton/yr Determine annual waste sent to landfill based on facility waste management service bills. 3 Waste Recycled Ton/yr Determine annual waste recycled based on facility waste management service bills. 4 Composting or Organic Recycling Y/N Determine whether the facility offers composting, organic recycling, or both by consulting with facilities management. 5 Waste Composted Ton/yr Determine annual waste composted based on facility waste management service bills. 6 Waste Diverted as Fraction of Total Waste % Add Line 3 (Recycling) to Line 5 (Composting), then divide by Line 1 (Total Waste). High Priority Line 6 (Waste Diverted) offsets 25% or less of total waste and Line 4 is “No.” Medium Priority Line 6 (Waste Diverted) offsets 25% to 50% of total waste. Low Priority Line 6 (Waste Diverted) offsets 50% or more of total waste and Line 4 is “Yes.”

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TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program (ACRP) Research Report 197: Guidebook for Developing a Comprehensive Renewable Resources Strategy highlights renewable energy sources, includes steps for developing a renewable energy strategy, and identifies metrics for measuring success. The report also highlights real-world examples of successful renewable resource projects at airports.

Renewable resources to reduce emissions from airports and climate impacts have been discussed for several years. Technological advancements have allowed organizations, specifically airports, to begin integrating renewable resources into their overall energy plans. In an effort to address climate impacts and achieve neutral carbon growth by 2020, a coalition of aviation stakeholders has adopted emission reduction targets.

Airports are also seeking to become energy independent, and using renewable resources as a strategy to get there. Further, as the costs for conventional energy sources increases, renewable resources become more financially attractive. Those airports who have implemented renewable resources have been able to do so at minimal cost.

While a business case can be made for the integration of any one particular renewable resource, an airport can be more strategic by adopting an overall renewable resource strategy. The renewable resources strategy can then become an input to other airport planning documents (e.g., airport master plan, strategic plan). The success of developing the plan as well as implementation require all internal and external stakeholders are involved in the process.

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