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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
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Appendix A

References

AARP. 2018. AARP Livability Index: Transforming communities for all ages. https://www.aarp.org/content/dam/aarp/ppi/2018/06/livability-index-transforming-communities-for-all-ages.pdf (accessed July 24, 2019).

Azar, A. 2018. Charter. In Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

Blakely, T. A., B. P. Kennedy, and I. Kawachi. 2001. Socioeconomic inequality in voting participation and self-rated health. American Journal of Public Health 91(1):99–104. doi: 10.2105/ajph.91.1.99.

Booske, B. C., J. K. Athens, D. A. Kindig, H. Park, and P. L. Remington. 2010. County Health Rankings working paper: Different perspectives for assigning weights to determinants of health. Madison, WI: University of Wisconsin–Madison, Population Health Institute.

Braveman, P. 2014. What are health disparities and health equity? We need to be clear. Public Health Report 129(Suppl 2):5–8. doi: 10.1177/00333549141291S203.

Braveman, P., and L. Gottlieb. 2014. The social determinants of health: It’s time to consider the causes of the causes. Public Health Reports 129(Suppl 2):19–31.

Chandra, A. 2019. Presentation to the Committee on the Selection of Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. http://www.nationalacademies.org/hmd/~/media/Files/Activity%20Files/PublicHealth/HealthyPeople2030/May%2028%20presentations/Session%202-1%20Chandra.pdf (accessed June 21, 2019).

CIA (Central Intelligence Agency). 2019. The World Factbook. Country Comparison: Life expectancy at birth. https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/rankorder/2102rank.html (accessed July 24, 2019).

HHS (Department of Health and Human Services). 2018. Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030: 9th Meeting Summary, May 14, 2018. https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/About-Healthy-People/Development-Healthy-People-2030/Committee-Meetings (accessed July 25, 2019).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×

HHS. 2019a. Healthy People [2020] Leading Health Indicators development and framework.https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/leading-health-indicators/Leading-Health-Indicators-Development-and-Framework (accessed June 20, 2019).

HHS. 2019b. Proposed objectives for inclusion in Healthy People 2030. https://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/ObjectivesPublicComment508_1.17.19.pdf (accessed June 20, 2019).

HHS. n.d. Evidence-based resources frequently asked questions (FAQs). https://www.healthypeople.gov/2020/Implement/EBR-glossary#selection-criteria (accessed July 24, 2019).

IHME (Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation). 2018. United States profile. Seattle, WA: Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, 2018. http://www.healthdata.org/united-states (accessed July 23, 2019).

IOM (Institute of Medicine). 1999. Leading health indicators for Healthy People 2010. Washington, DC: National Academy Press.

IOM. 2011. Leading health indicators for Healthy People 2020. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2012. For the public’s health: Investing in a healthier future. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2013. Toward quality measures for population health and the Leading Health Indicators. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

IOM. 2015. Vital signs: Core metrics for health and health care progress. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

Kaplan, R. M., and A. Milstein. 2019. Contributions of health care to longevity: A review of 4 estimation methods. Annals of Family Medicine 17:267–272. doi: 10.1370/afm.2362.

Krieger, N. 2017. Health equity and the fallacy of treating causes of population health as if they sum to 100%. American Journal of Public Health 107(4):541–549.

Lantz, P. M., E. Golberstein, J. S. House, and J. Morenoff. 2010. Social and behavioral risk factors for mortality in a national 19-year prospective study of U.S. adults. Social Science & Medicine 70:1558–1566.

LaVeist, T. A., D. Gaskin, and P. Richard. 2011. Estimating the economic burden of racial health inequalities in the United States. International Journal of Health Sciences 41(2):231–238.

McGinnis, J. M., P. Williams-Russo, and J. Knickman. 2002. The case for more active policy attention to health promotion. Health Affairs 21(20):78–93.

NASEM (National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine). 2017. Communities in action: Pathways to health equity. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press.

NASEM. 2019. Meeting 3: Committee on Informing the Selection of Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC. http://nationalacademies.org/hmd/Activities/PublicHealth/LeadingHealthIndicatorsForHealthyPeople2030/2019-MAY-28.aspx (accessed July 2, 2019).

NCHS (National Center for Health Statistics). 2010. Healthy People 2010 final review: Leading Health Indicators. https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/data/hpdata2010/hp2010_final_review_leading_health_indicators.pdf (accessed May 21, 2019).

Ortiz, S. E., and B. L. Johannes. 2018. Building the case for housing policy: Understanding public beliefs about housing affordability as a key social determinant of health. SSM–Population Health 6:63–71. doi: 10.1016/j.ssmph.2018.08.008.

Robert, S. A., and B. C. Booske. 2011. US opinions on health determinants and social policy as health policy. American Journal of Public Health 101(9):1655–1663. doi: 10.2105/AJPH.2011.300217.

SAC (Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2020). 2010. Evidence-based clinical and public health: Generating and applying the evidence. https://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/EvidenceBasedClinicalPH2010.pdf (accessed July 24, 2019).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×

SAC (Secretary’s Advisory Committee on National Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2030). 2018a. Recommendations for the Healthy People 2030 Leading Health Indicators. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

SAC. 2018b. Recommendations for developing objectives, setting priorities, identifying data needs, and involving stakeholders for Healthy People 2030. Report 2. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

SAC. 2018c. Stakeholder engagement and communication for Healthy People 2030. Report 5. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

SAC. 2019a. Issue briefs to inform development and implementation of Healthy People 2030. https://www.healthypeople.gov/sites/default/files/Committee-LHI-Report-to-Secretary_1.pdf (accessed July 18, 2019).

SAC. 2019b. Assessment and recommendations for proposed objectives for Healthy People 2030. Report 7. Washington, DC: Department of Health and Human Services.

Taylor, L. 2018. Housing and health: An overview of the literature. Health Affairs Health Policy Brief, June 7, 2018. doi: 10.1377/hpb20180313.396577.

WHO (World Health Organization). 2014. Constitution of the World Health Organization. http://apps.who.int/gb/bd/PDF/bd48/basic-documents-48th-edition-en.pdf#page=7 (accessed June 20, 2019).

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×
Page 35
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×
Page 36
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×
Page 37
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: References." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2019. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25531.
×
Page 38
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Every ten years, the Department of Health and Human Service's Healthy People Initiative develops a new set of science-based, national objectives with the goal of improving the health of all Americans. Defining balanced and comprehensive criteria for healthy people enables the public, programs, and policymakers to gauge our progress and reevaluate efforts towards a healthier society. Criteria for Selecting the Leading Health Indicators for Healthy People 2030 makes recommendations for the development of Leading Health Indicators for the initiative's Healthy People 2030 framework. The authoring committee's assessments inform their recommendations for the Healthy People Federal Interagency Workgroup in their endeavor to develop the latest Leading Health Indicators. The finalized Leading Health Indicators will establish the criteria for healthy Americans and help update policies that will guide decision-marking throughout the next decade. This report also reviews and reflects upon current and past Healthy People materials to identify gaps and new objectives.

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