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Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities (2020)

Chapter:Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
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Appendix D

Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff

ENRIQUETA C. BOND (Chair) is a founding partner of QE Philanthropic Advisors, which provides consulting services for philanthropic and nonprofit organizations on program development and governance. She previously served as president of the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, a private foundation whose mission is to advance the medical sciences through the support of research and education. Prior to her role at Burroughs Wellcome, she served as a staff officer, division director, and executive officer at the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine). She has served on the board of the Research Triangle Park Foundation, the National Institute for Statistical Sciences, the Northeast Biodefense Center, and the New England Center of Excellence in Biodefense and Emerging Infectious Diseases. She is a member of the council of the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and she has served as the vice chair of the Board of Scientific Counselors for the National Center for Infectious Diseases at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and as the chair of the Board of Regents of the National Library of Medicine. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has an A.B. from Wellesley College, an M.A. from the University of Virginia, and a Ph.D. in genetics and molecular biology from Georgetown University.

DIMITRI CHRISTAKIS is the George Adkins Professor of Pediatrics at the University of Washington School of Medicine, director of the Center for Child Health, Behavior and Development at Seattle Children’s Research Institute, and an attending pediatrician at Seattle Children’s Hospital. With

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×

support from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, and numerous foundations, his laboratory focuses on the effects of environmental influences on children’s health. His goal is to develop actionable strategies to optimize children’s cognitive, social, and emotional development. That work has taken him from the examination room to the community and, most recently, to the cages of newborn mice. He is the author of more than 230 original research articles, a textbook of pediatrics, and The Elephant in the Living Room: Make Television Work for Your Kids. He is a recipient of the Academic Pediatric Association Research Award for outstanding contributions to pediatric research over his career. He has an M.D. from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and an M.P.H. from the University of Washington School of Public Health.

KENNE DIBNER (Study Director) is a senior program officer with the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director for Learning Through Citizen Science: Enhancing Opportunities by Design and Science Literacy: Concepts, Contexts, and Consequences, as well as a recently completed assessment of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate’s education portfolio. Prior to this position, she worked as a research associate at Policy Studies Associates, Inc., where she conducted evaluations of education policies and programs for government agencies, foundations, and school districts, including an evaluation of a partnership with the U.S. Department of Education, the National Park Service, and the Bureau of Indian Education to provide citizen science programming to tribal youth. She has also served as a research consultant with the Center on Education Policy. She has a B.A in English literature from Skidmore College and a Ph.D. in education policy from Michigan State University.

LETICIA GARCILAZO GREEN is a research associate for the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. As a member of the board staff, she has supported studies focusing on criminal justice, science education, and climate change. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as a legal assistant with a law firm that specialized in security clearances and white-collar crime in Washington, D.C. She has a B.S. in psychology and a B.A. in sociology with a concentration in criminology from Louisiana State University and an M.A. in forensic psychology from The George Washington University.

MICHAEL LACH is the Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment at Township High School District 113, a small district north of Chicago. Prior to this position, he served as the director of STEM education and strategic initiatives at UChicago STEM Education. He also

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×

previously served as an administrator with the Chicago Public Schools, including as chief officer of teaching and learning, overseeing curriculum and instruction in 600+ schools. During the Obama Administration, he led science and mathematics education efforts at the U.S. Department of Education. He began his teaching career teaching as a charter member of Teach for America and subsequently joined the national office of Teach for America as Director of Program Design, developing a portfolio-based alternative-certification system that was adopted by several states. In 1995, he was named one of Radio Shack’s top 100 technology teachers, and he is a recipient of the Illinois Physics Teacher of the Year award. He has served as an Albert Einstein Distinguished Educator Fellow, advising Congressman Vernon Ehlers (R-MI) on science, technology, and education issues. He has a B.A. degree in physics from Carleton College, M.A. degrees from Columbia University and Northeastern Illinois University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois at Chicago.

PHYLLIS D. MEADOWS is a senior fellow in the health program of The Kresge Foundation, where she advises the health team on the development of its overall strategic direction and provides leadership in the design and implementation of grantmaking initiatives and projects. She has led the foundation’s Emerging Leaders and Public Health Program and advises and supports the development of cross-team programming efforts with the Detroit Environment and Human Services Programs. She is the former associate dean for practice at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health and a clinical professor in health management and policy. Her work in public health includes serving as deputy director and then director/public health officer for the city of Detroit. She has served as adjunct faculty with the School of Nursing at both Wayne State University and Oakland University. She also previously worked at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation as a program director for children and youth in education and higher education and for communities both nationally and internationally. She has a B.S.N. from Oakland University and an M.A. in community health nursing and a Ph.D. in applied sociology from Wayne State University.

KATHLEEN MOORE, the principal owner of Kathleen Moore and Associates, provides consulting services to local educational agencies throughout California. Those services cover a wide range, including educational planning, maximizing and leveraging funding, facility program management, and master plan development and implementation. Prior to starting Kathleen Moore and Associates, she was the director of the School Facilities and Transportation Services Division with the California Department of Education. In this role, she directed a staff of 40 and was responsible for the annual approval of more than 100 school sites and 400 school design

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×

plans for public school projects in California. She also provided leadership and policy development to ensure California’s K–12 school facilities support student learning, achievement, and workforce development. She has a B.A. in political science from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.P.A. from the University of San Francisco.

CAITLIN RIVERS is a senior scholar at the Johns Hopkins Center for Health Security and an assistant professor in the Department of Environmental Health and Engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Her research focuses on improving public health preparedness and response. She has participated as author or contributor to major reports that are guiding the U.S. response to COVID-19, including National Coronavirus Response: A Roadmap to Reopening; A National COVID-19 Surveillance System: Achieving Containment; Filling in the Blanks: National Research Needs to Guide Decisions about Reopening Schools in the United States; and A National Plan to Enable Comprehensive COVID-19 Case Finding and Contact Tracing in the US. She is the lead author on Public Health Principles for a Phased Reopening During COVID-19: Guidance for Governors, a report that is being used by the National Governors Association, the state of Maryland, and the District of Columbia to guide reopening plans. She recently testified to the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education and Related Agencies on the COVID-19 response. She has a Ph.D. in bioinformatics and computational biology from Virginia Tech.

KEISHA SCARLETT is the chief of equity, partnerships, and engagement with Seattle Public Schools. In this cabinet-level role, she oversees all racial equity initiatives and capacity building of staff, family partnerships, community partnerships, community engagement, and strategic oversight of high-visibility, cross-organizational partnerships and philanthropic relationships. She has previously served in multiple school administration roles, ranging from STEM (science technology, engineering, and mathematics) teacher to school leader to district administrator. She is a recipient of the Middle Level Washington State Principal of the Year. She has an Ed.D. from the University of Washington.

NATHANIEL SCHWARTZ is a professor of practice at the Annenberg Institute for School Reform at Brown University. He leads Annenberg’s efforts to develop local partnerships that directly improve the quality of schools and experiences of students while producing nationally relevant research. He was previously the chief research and strategy officer for the Tennessee Department of Education. In that role, he led the department’s research and strategic planning teams, contributing to the launch of Tennessee

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×

Succeeds, a strategic plan and vision aimed at increasing postsecondary and career readiness for Tennessee’s 1 million students, and to the creation of the Tennessee Education Research Alliance, an innovative state-level research partnership with Vanderbilt University. He earlier worked as a high school science teacher in Illinois and Arkansas. He has a B.A. from Harvard College and an M.P.P. and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan.

HEIDI SCHWEINGRUBER (Board Director) is the director of the Board on Science Education at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. She has served as study director or co-study director for a wide range of studies, including those on revising national standards for K–12 science education, learning and teaching science in grades K–8, and mathematics learning in early childhood. She also coauthored two award-winning books for practitioners that translate the findings of National Academies’ reports for a broader audience, one on using research in K–8 science classrooms and one on information science education. Prior to joining the National Academies, she worked as a senior research associate at the Institute of Education Sciences in the U.S. Department of Education. She also served on the faculty of Rice University and as the director of research for the Rice University School Mathematics Project, an outreach program in K–12 mathematics education. She has a Ph.D. in psychology (developmental) and anthropology and a certificate in culture and cognition, both from the University of Michigan.

JEFFREY M. VINCENT is a director and cofounder of the Center for Cities & Schools at the University of California, Berkeley. His research and publications cover a variety of issues, including school infrastructure planning, school siting and design, sustainable communities, community development, educational economics, housing policy, state school construction policies, joint use of schools, youth engagement in redevelopment, refugee resettlement, and transportation policy. His work reflects two key ideas: that finding policy answers requires new modes of scholarship that draw on a variety of quantitative and qualitative methods and that it requires collaborative work between the too-often-siloed public, nonprofit, and private sectors. Much of his work involves “engaged scholarship,” done for and in partnership with public agencies, nonprofit organizations and others with public interests in mind. He is an instructor and graduate student mentor in the university’s PLUS Fellows Program. He is a recipient of the Berkeley Chancellor’s Award for Public Service, Research in the Public Interest. He has a Ph.D. in city and regional planning from the University of California, Berkeley.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members and Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2020. Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25858.
×
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The COVID-19 pandemic has presented unprecedented challenges to the nation's K-12 education system. The rush to slow the spread of the virus led to closures of schools across the country, with little time to ensure continuity of instruction or to create a framework for deciding when and how to reopen schools. States, districts, and schools are now grappling with the complex and high-stakes questions of whether to reopen school buildings and how to operate them safely if they do reopen. These decisions need to be informed by the most up-to-date evidence about the SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19; about the impacts of school closures on students and families; and about the complexities of operating school buildings as the pandemic persists.

Reopening K-12 Schools During the COVID-19 Pandemic: Prioritizing Health, Equity, and Communities provides guidance on the reopening and operation of elementary and secondary schools for the 2020-2021 school year. The recommendations of this report are designed to help districts and schools successfully navigate the complex decisions around reopening school buildings, keeping them open, and operating them safely.

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