National Academies Press: OpenBook

High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults (2021)

Chapter:Appendix B: Meeting Agendas

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
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Appendix B

Meeting Agendas

Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates
and Socioeconomic Disparities
Meeting #1
February 11-12, 2019

Keck Center, E Street Conference Room
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1 – MONDAY, FEBRUARY 11, 2019

9:00 – 9:30 am Welcome, Introductions, Overview of Agenda
Mary Ellen O’Connell, Executive Director, Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE)
Kathleen Mullan Harris (Committee Chair), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Malay Majmundar, Study Director
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
9:30 – 10:00 am Overview of the National Academies Study Process – What Lies Ahead
Mary Ellen O’Connell, Executive Director, DBASSE
10:00 – 11:00 am Sponsor Interests and Perspectives; Discussion of Statement of Task
Amelia Karraker, National Institute on Aging
Kerry Anne McGeary, Senior Program Officer, Research-Evaluation-Learning, Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
11:00 – 11:15 am BREAK
11:15 am–12:00 pm Mid-Life Mortality: Overview of Trends and Differentials
Ryan Masters, University of Colorado Boulder
12:00 – 12:40 pm LUNCH (discussion continues)
12:40 – 2:00 pm Behavioral Factors, Life-Course Perspectives, and the Role of SES and the Health System: Highlights from the June 2017 Planning Meeting1
Kathleen Mullan Harris (Committee Chair), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
2:00 – 5:15 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
5:15 pm Adjournment

___________________

1 See http://sites.nationalacademies.org/DBASSE/CPOP/DBASSE_180012.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×

DAY 2 – TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2019

9:00 am – 3:00 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
3:00 pm Adjournment

Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates and Socioeconomic Disparities
Meeting #2
April 30 – May 1, 2019

Keck Center, Room 206
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1 – TUESDAY, APRIL 30

8:30 – 10:30 am CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
10:30 – 11:15 am Understanding the Role of Economic Changes and Macroeconomic Shocks
Christopher Ruhm, University of Virginia
(15 minute presentation followed by Q&A)
11:15 am – 12: 00 pm Understanding Trends in Optimism/Wellness/Despair
Carol Graham, Brookings Institution
(15 minute presentation followed by Q&A)
12:00 – 12:45 pm LUNCH
12:45 – 1:30 pm Understanding Family Structure and the Life Course
Andrew Cherlin, Johns Hopkins University
(15 minute presentation followed by Q&A)
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
1:30 – 2:00 pm General Discussion
2:00 – 2:15 pm BREAK
2:15 – 5:00 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
5:00 pm Adjournment

DAY 2 – WEDNESDAY, MAY 1

9:00 am – 3:00 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
3:00 pm Adjournment

Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates and Socioeconomic Disparities
Meeting #3
July 18-19, 2019

Keck Center, Room 208
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1 – THURDAY, JULY 18

8:30 – 8:45 am Welcome and Overview of Agenda
8:45 – 9:45 am Anne Case (Princeton University)
Will discuss updates to her research on midlife mortality
9:45 – 10:00 am BREAK
10:00 – 11:00 am Erika Blacksher (University of Washington)
Will discuss concepts of “whiteness” and the potential relevance of race/racism as it relates to midlife mortality
11:00 – 11:30 am General Discussion
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
11:30 am – 12:30 pm LUNCH
12:30 – 5:00 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
5:00 pm Adjournment

DAY 2 – FRIDAY, JULY 19

9:00 am – 3:00 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
3:00 pm Adjournment

Committee on Rising Midlife Mortality Rates and Socioeconomic Disparities
Meeting #4
October 21-22, 2019

Keck Center, Room 101
500 Fifth Street, NW
Washington, DC 20001

DAY 1 – MONDAY, OCTOBER 21

8:30 – 8:45 am Welcome and Overview of Agenda
8:45 – 9:45 am Jennifer Silva (Indiana University Bloomington)
Will discuss qualitative/ethnographic work relating to mid-life mortality, including on sentiments on “hopelessness” and “despair” and how they affect health
9:45 – 10:00 am BREAK
10:00 – 11:00 am Kathleen Frydl
Will provide an overview of the role played by opioids and other drugs, as well as historical/political/regulatory context for supply- and demand-side forces
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
11:00 am – 12:00 pm General Discussion
12:00 – 1:00 pm LUNCH
1:00 – 5:30 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
5:30 pm Adjournment

DAY 2 – TUESDAY, OCTOBER 22

9:00 am – 3:30 pm CLOSED SESSION (committee and staff only)
3:30 pm Adjournment
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page559
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page560
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page561
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page562
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page563
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Meeting Agendas." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. High and Rising Mortality Rates Among Working-Age Adults. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/25976.
×
Page564
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The past century has witnessed remarkable advances in life expectancy in the United States and throughout the world. In 2010, however, progress in life expectancy in the United States began to stall, despite continuing to increase in other high-income countries. Alarmingly, U.S. life expectancy fell between 2014 and 2015 and continued to decline through 2017, the longest sustained decline in life expectancy in a century (since the influenza pandemic of 1918-1919). The recent decline in U.S. life expectancy appears to have been the product of two trends: (1) an increase in mortality among middle-aged and younger adults, defined as those aged 25-64 years (i.e., "working age"), which began in the 1990s for several specific causes of death (e.g., drug- and alcohol-related causes and suicide); and (2) a slowing of declines in working-age mortality due to other causes of death (mainly cardiovascular diseases) after 2010.

High and Rising Mortality Rates among Working Age Adults highlights the crisis of rising premature mortality that threatens the future of the nation's families, communities, and national wellbeing. This report identifies the key drivers of increasing death rates and disparities in working-age mortality over the period 1990 to 2017; elucidates modifiable risk factors that could alleviate poor health in the working-age population, as well as widening health inequalities; identifies key knowledge gaps and make recommendations for future research and data collection to fill those gaps; and explores potential policy implications. After a comprehensive analysis of the trends in working-age mortality by age, sex, race/ethnicity, and geography using the most up-to-date data, this report then looks upstream to the macrostructural factors (e.g., public policies, macroeconomic trends, social and economic inequality, technology) and social determinants (e.g., socioeconomic status, environment, social networks) that may affect the health of working-age Americans in multiple ways and through multiple pathways.

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