National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Chapter 4 - Case Examples
Page 70
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Summary of Findings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Use of Vehicle Probe and Cellular GPS Data by State Departments of Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26094.
×
Page 70
Page 71
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Summary of Findings." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Use of Vehicle Probe and Cellular GPS Data by State Departments of Transportation. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26094.
×
Page 71

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

70 Summary of Findings The objective of this synthesis was to document how state DOTs are applying vehicle probe and cellular GPS data for monitoring, planning, and real-time information. Nearly 50 poten- tial and current uses of probe data were identified in the literature, and survey respondents confirmed them. The survey and case examples demonstrated that a significant percentage of agencies currently use probe-based speed data to support federal performance reporting, project prioritization, before-and-after studies, real-time operations, and traveler information. While not as prevalent, Origin-Destination (53% or respondents), trajectory, (20% of respon- dents), and LBS data (31% of respondents) are used to support similar uses as well as innova- tive approaches to multimodal operations, safety, and performance management, and recently to understand the impact of the national response to the COVID-19 pandemic on travel and mobility. The barriers to the adoption of probe and cellular GPS data were small, with nearly 60% of respondents claiming no barriers for use. For those who did struggle to adopt, the chief concerns included quality and/or accuracy, cost/budget issues, a lack of capacity to work with large data sets, or the effort required to integrate into existing platforms. Most state DOTs access, analyze, and otherwise work with probe data through third-party analytics platforms, either directly or by hiring consultants who use the platforms on behalf of the state DOTs. The case examples have shown that probe and cellular GPS data are versatile in that they can be used to support a diverse set of goals. State DOTs use these data sets to accomplish tangible outcomes such as improved traffic incident management and better operational deci- sions (MATOC, PennDOT, and MassDOT), improved winter weather maintenance (ODOT), improved investment decisions through better informed project selection and congestion manage- ment process (VDOT, Richmond Regional TPO), and better traveler information (GDOT). The literature review showed that while probe-based speed data have been studied and validated extensively by dozens of agencies, academics, and independent third parties, the trajectory-related probe data are still relatively new with a limited number of independent validations. Even though these initial validation efforts have proven the data to be of high quality and usefulness for certain applications, further research may be needed in this area to help reduce barriers to use and to provide agencies with the confidence to use the data for additional areas. Unlike probe-based speed data, which has a relatively small number of proven providers, the number of vendors of trajectory data is steadily increasing. Each of them will likely need validation before agencies will be willing to adopt and use for a wide range of applications. C H A P T E R 5

Summary of Findings 71 During the interview process, it was noted that many interviewees were unaware of the work their peers are doing with probe data. This reaffirmed the need for this synthesis but also for potential additional outreach, information sharing, or other efforts to help standardize data use. Future research could explore how the data described in this synthesis can be leveraged to solve specific ongoing challenges that agencies are facing including the response and recovery efforts associated with the COVID-19 pandemic, lowering the cost of doing business, and being able to respond to citizen and elected official inquiries regarding transportation invest- ment decisions.

Next: References »
Use of Vehicle Probe and Cellular GPS Data by State Departments of Transportation Get This Book
×
 Use of Vehicle Probe and Cellular GPS Data by State Departments of Transportation
Buy Paperback | $79.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Over the last decade, state departments of transportation (DOTs) have begun to use vehicle probe and cellular GPS data for a variety of purposes, including real-time traffic and incident monitoring, highway condition, and travel demand management. DOTs are also using vehicle probe and cellular GPS data to inform system planning and investment decisions.

The TRB National Cooperative Highway Research Program's NCHRP Synthesis 561: Use of Vehicle Probe and Cellular GPS Data by State Departments of Transportation documents how DOTs are applying vehicle probe and cellular GPS data for planning and real-time traffic and incident monitoring and communication.

In December 2021, an erratum was issued.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!