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Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop (2021)

Chapter:Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
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Appendix B

Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members

Riana Elyse Anderson is an assistant professor in the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. She completed a clinical and community psychology residency at Yale University’s School of Medicine and a Ford Foundation postdoctoral fellowship in applied psychology at the University of Pennsylvania. Anderson uses mixed methods in clinical interventions to study racial discrimination and socialization in Black families to reduce racial stress and trauma and improve psychological well-being and family functioning. She is the developer and director of the EMBRace (Engaging, Managing, and Bonding through Race) intervention. Anderson is involved nationally as an appointed member of the American Psychological Association’s Children, Youth, and Families Committee, the Society for Research in Child Development’s Equity & Justice Committee, and the Society for Research on Adolescence’s Antiracism Task Force. Anderson also serves as the cohost of Our Mental Health Minute, a vlog and podcast geared toward reducing mental health stigma in the Black community. She earned her PhD in clinical and community psychology at the University of Virginia.

Harolyn M. E. Belcher (Planning Committee) is the director of the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and Center for Diversity in Public Health Leadership Training at the Kennedy Krieger Institute. She is the principal investigator for three Centers for Disease Control and Prevention public health leadership training programs that promote diversity in public health research, training, and leadership experiences for undergraduate, public health graduate, medical, dental, pharmacy, and veterinary students.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

She is co-investigator on a National Institutes of Health grant to conduct a cost comparison of two evidence-based parent interventions for young children with emotional and behavioral problems. Belcher received her BS in zoology from Howard University, a medical degree from the Howard University College of Medicine, and a master’s degree in health science focusing on mental health from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Nathaniel Counts is the senior vice president of behavioral health innovation for Mental Health America (MHA) and clinical assistant professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. At MHA, Counts leads policy research and advocacy centered around the social and economic determinants of behavioral health, prevention and population-health strategies, and the influence of consumer technologies. His research has focused on aligning incentives to finance effective prevention and intervention in behavioral health. Counts received his JD cum laude from Harvard Law School, where he was a Petrie-Flom Center for Health law policy student fellow, and his BA in biology from Johns Hopkins.

William A. Darity is the Samuel DuBois Cook professor of public policy, African and African American studies, and economics and the director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. He has served as chair of the Department of African and African American Studies and was the founding director of the Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality at Duke. Darity’s research focuses on inequality by race, class, and ethnicity, stratification economics, schooling and the racial achievement gap, North-South theories of trade and development, skin shade and labor market outcomes, the economics of reparations, the Atlantic slave trade and the Industrial Revolution, the history of economics, and the psychosocial effects of exposure to unemployment.

Mouhcine Guettabi is an associate professor of economics at the University of Alaska in Anchorage. Over the last few years, he has examined the impacts of the Alaska Permanent Fund Dividend on crime, employment, and childhood obesity. His most recent work evaluates the effect of this unconditional cash transfer on health care usage and spending.

Darrick Hamilton is the Henry Cohen professor of economics and urban policy and the founding director of the Institute on Race and Political Economy at the New School. Hamilton has served as a member of the economic committee of the Biden-Sanders Unity Task Force. He has testified before several Senate and House committees, including the Joint

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

Economic Committee on the nation’s potential policy responses to the COVID-19 pandemic-induced health and economic crises. He is member of the Marguerite Casey Foundation in partnership with the Group Health Foundation’s inaugural class of Freedom Scholars. He is a graduate of Oberlin College and earned a PhD in economics from the University of North Carolina.

Maxine Hayes served the Washington State Department of Health from 1988 to 2013, 16 of those years as a state health officer. As the state’s top public health doctor, her role included advising the governor and the secretary of health on issues ranging from health promotion and chronic disease prevention to emergency response, which included pandemic influenza preparedness. She also worked closely with the medical community, local health departments, and community groups. Prior to her appointment as the state health officer, Hayes was the assistant secretary of community and family at the Department of Health. She is the recipient of many awards and honors for her work in maternal and child health, including the American Medical Association’s Dr. Nathan Davis Award, the 2003 Heroes in Healthcare Lifetime Achievement Award through the Washington Health Foundation, the APHA Helen Rodriguez-Trias Social Justice Award, and the Vince Hutchins Award for Leadership in Maternal and Child Health. Hayes is emeritus clinical professor of pediatrics at the University of Washington. She holds two honorary doctorate degrees, one from Spellman College and one from the State University of New York. Hayes is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics and is an elected member of the Institute of Medicine.

Neal Horen is a clinical psychologist who has focused on early childhood mental health for the last 20 years. He is director of the Early Childhood Division at the Georgetown University Center for Child and Human Development. Horen has worked closely with all 50 states, numerous tribes, territories, and communities in supporting their development of systems of care for young children and their families, as well as in Mexico, UAE, Lebanon, and Jordan. He has delivered hundreds of training seminars across the country and has co-led the development of numerous materials addressing trauma, infant mental health, disabilities, and staff wellness and has co-led efforts at building an online professional development curriculum on infant and early childhood mental health consultation in his leadership role at the National Center of Excellence on Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Consultation. Dr. Horen’s primary interest is in early childhood mental health, and he has lectured extensively on infant and early childhood mental health, challenging behaviors in young children, social skills development, as well as the impact of trauma on child development.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

Mary Ann McCabe is an associate clinical professor of pediatrics at the George Washington University School of Medicine and is part of the affiliate faculty in applied developmental psychology at George Mason University. She is also a clinical psychologist and consultant in independent practice. McCabe is chair of the APA Interdivisional Task Force for Child and Adolescent Mental Health, and is chair of the Consortium for Science-Based Information on Children, Youth, and Families that has developed a new web resource center: www.infoaboutkids.org. She was director of the Office for Policy and Communications at the Society for Research in Child Development (SRCD) where she oversaw bridging research with policy and practice and directed the SRCD congressional and executive branch policy fellowship programs. Her areas of scholarship have included knowledge transfer across research, practice and policy, promoting child mental health, and the capacity of minors to participate in decision making about medical and mental health treatment and research.

Kimberly Noble is a professor of neuroscience and education at Teachers College, Columbia University. As a neuroscientist and board-certified pediatrician, she directs the Neurocognition, Early Experience, and Development lab, where she and her team study how socioeconomic inequality relates to children’s cognitive, emotional, and brain development. Her work examines socioeconomic disparities in cognitive development as well as brain structure and function across infancy, childhood, and adolescence. She is particularly interested in understanding how early such disparities develop in infancy and early childhood, the modifiable environmental differences that account for these disparities, and the ways we might use to harness this research to inform the design of interventions. She is one of the principal investigators of Baby’s First Years, the first clinical trial of poverty reduction to assess the causal impact of income on children’s cognitive, emotional, and brain development in the first three years of life. She is a fellow of the Association for Psychological Science (APS) and was awarded the APS Janet Taylor Spence Award for Transformative Early Career Contributions. Noble received her undergraduate, graduate, and medical degrees at the University of Pennsylvania and completed her residency in pediatrics at Columbia University Medical Center/Morgan Stanley Children’s Hospital of New York-Presbyterian.

Cheryl Polk (Planning Committee) is Safe & Sound’s first chief program officer. Safe & Sound has worked for more than 45 years to prevent child abuse and reduce its devastating effects. Polk supervises the agency’s clinical and family teams: integrated children and family services, which seeks to promote mental health, and community education and strategic partnerships. Prior to this role, she served as president of the HighScope

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

Educational Research Foundation. Polk has promoted healthy child development, especially for children at risk of school failure, and their families. She served as the executive director of the Lisa and John Pritzker Family Fund where her insight into early childhood development and philanthropy helped create innovative intervention programs for children exposed to community and interpersonal trauma. She was president of the board of directors of ZERO TO THREE: National Center for Infants, Toddlers, and Families and has served as a board member of that organization for more than 10 years. Polk received her PhD in psychology from the California School of Professional Psychology-San Francisco at Alliant International University.

Carlos E. Santos (Planning Committee) is an associate professor at the University of California, Los Angeles Luskin School of Public Affairs. Santos’ research draws on diverse disciplines, theories, and methods to better understand the implications for development and well-being stemming from overlapping oppressions such as racism and heterosexism that create unique conditions shaped by individual social contexts. He is interested in how individuals cope with these overlapping stressors through attitudes produced by belonging to different social groups (such as having pride in one’s ethnic, racial, or sexual identity group) and positions one occupies (being undocumented, for instance), and the effect of such coping on mental health, educational outcomes, and civic engagement. He has received three early career awards by various national associations including the Society for the Psychological Study of Culture, Ethnicity, and Race of the American Psychological Association and the Latinx Caucus of the Society for Research in Child Development. He received his PhD in developmental psychology from New York University, a master’s degree in education from Harvard University, and a bachelor’s degree from New York University.

Brian Smedley is chief of psychology in the public interest at the American Psychological Association where he leads efforts to apply the science and practice of psychology to the fundamental problems of human welfare and social justice. Previously, he was cofounder and executive director of the National Collaborative for Health Equity (www.nationalcollaborative.org), a project that connects research, policy analysis, and communication with on-the-ground activism to advance health equity. He was also co-director of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Culture of Health Leadership National Program Center. Smedley was vice president and director of the Health Policy Institute of the Joint Center for Political and Economic Studies in Washington, DC, a research and policy organization focused on addressing the needs of communities of color.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

Deborah Klein Walker (Planning Committee) is the current president of the Global Alliance for Behavioral Health and Social Justice (formerly the American Orthopsychiatric Association) and a former president of the American Public Health Association and the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs. She formerly served as vice president and senior fellow at Abt Associates, Inc. and as the associate commissioner for programs and prevention at the Massachusetts Department of Public Health. Prior to state service, Walker was an associate professor of human development at the Harvard School of Public Health and a faculty member at the Harvard Graduate School of Education. Her research and policy interests include child and family policy, program implementation and evaluation, public health practice, disability policy, community health systems, health outcomes, and data systems. She received her EdD in human development from Harvard University.

Michael Warren is the associate administrator of the Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB), part of the Health Resources and Services Administration at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. MCHB’s mission is to improve the health of America’s mothers, children, and families. Warren is a board-certified pediatrician. Prior to joining the Department of Health, he served as an assistant professor in the Department of Pediatrics at Vanderbilt and as medical director in the Governor’s Office of Children’s Care Coordination. He completed his pediatrics residency, chief residency, and fellowship in academic general pediatrics at Vanderbilt, where he also obtained a master’s in public health. He is a fellow of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Warren graduated summa cum laude with honors in psychology from Wake Forest University and earned his medical degree from the Brody School of Medicine at East Carolina University.

David Williams is the Florence and Laura Norman professor of public health and chair in the Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. He is also a professor of African and African American studies at Harvard University. His research has enhanced our understanding of the ways in which socioeconomic status, race, stress, racism, health behavior, and religious involvement can affect physical and mental health. He is the author of the Everyday Discrimination Scale, one of the most widely used measures of discrimination in health studies today. He is currently working on identifying a comprehensive but brief measure of the key stressors and resilience resources that contribute to the levels and impact of toxic stress on the health of infants and children. Williams is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the National Academy of Sciences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

David W. Willis (Planning Committee) is a senior fellow at the Center for the Study of Social Policy. He leads a national initiative to advance early relational health for child health and communities. A board-certified, developmental behavioral pediatrician, Willis was a clinician in Oregon for more than 30 years with a practice focused on early childhood development and family therapy. Most recently, he was the first executive director of the Perigee Fund, a Seattle-based philanthropy focused on strengthening the social and emotional development of all babies and toddlers and on increasing workforce capacity to enhance it. Willis has been a national lecturer, an advisor to early childhood national policy, and a visionary. Throughout his career, he has worked for the transformation of child health care in coordination with early childhood communities and focused on the advancement of early relational health and young children’s social, emotional, and developmental well-being. Willis received his MD from the Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University.

Joseph Wright is senior vice president and chief medical officer of Capital Region Health within the University of Maryland Medical System. He previously served as professor and chair of pediatrics at the Howard University College of Medicine and as senior vice president within the Children’s National Health System. He maintains appointments as adjunct professor of pediatrics, health policy, and management at the University of Maryland Schools of Medicine and Public Health, respectively. Academically, Wright numbers among the nation’s original cohort of board-certified pediatric emergency physicians with scholarly interests that include injury prevention and the needs of underserved communities. Wright is an elected member of the board of directors of the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and is immediate past chair of the AAP Task Force on Addressing Bias and Discrimination. Wright earned a BA from Wesleyan University, his MD from Rutgers University, and an MPH in administrative medicine and management from George Washington University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
Page59
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
Page60
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographical Sketches of Workshop Presenters and Planning Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Reimagining a System of Care to Promote the Well-Being of Children and Families: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26098.
×
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The economic and physical and health impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic were disproportionately borne by Black, Hispanic, and Native Americans. The true impacts on children and families may not be fully known until after the pandemic ends, but many agree that a new system of care is needed to promote the well-being of children and families in the pandemic’s aftermath.

On September 14-15, 2020, the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Forum for Children’s Well-Being organized a workshop focused on building systems to support children and families in the aftermath of the COVID-19 pandemic. Workshop speakers and organizers paid particular attention to how economic, behavioral, and public health systems that can combat racism and promote the well-being of children and families. Participants engaged in discussionsabout a broad range of existing tools and resources that could be used to further promote family well-being and health equity in the United States.

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