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The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries (2021)

Chapter: Appendix: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
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Appendix

Committee Biographies

Bonnie J. McCay (NAS) (Chair) is a Distinguished Professor Emerita from Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey. Dr. McCay earned a Ph.D. from Columbia University in ecological anthropology. Her research interests lie within the anthropology of coastal fishing communities and marine fisheries; the interplay of law, culture, and environmental change; roles of cooperatives in fisheries businesses and management; the history and socioeconomic dimensions of Limited Access Privilege Programs and other forms of quasi-privatization in marine fisheries; and adaptations to climate change in fisheries. She served for many years on the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council, and she received the Award of Excellence from the American Fisheries Society in 2013. She is a member of the National Academy of Sciences and has served on numerous National Research Council committees, including the Committee on Ecosystem Management and Sustaining Marine Fisheries and the Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas.

Joshua K. Abbott is a Professor of environmental and resource economics in the School of Sustainability at Arizona State University in Tempe, Arizona. Dr. Abbott earned an M.A. in economics from the University of Washington and a Ph.D. in agricultural and resource economics from the University of California, Davis. His expertise is in resource economics, including the management of commercial and recreational fisheries. He has published multiple papers evaluating the economic and distributional effects of individual transferable quotas and other forms of catch shares in both commercial and recreational for-hire fisheries. He is the Editor in Chief of the international journal Marine Resource Economics.

Lee G. Anderson is the Maxwell P. and Mildred H. Harrington Professor Emeritus of Marine Studies and Economics at the University of Delaware. He earned a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Washington in 1970. Dr. Anderson has written or edited 6 books and more than 60 scientific papers on fisheries economics and the economics of fisheries management. He is a past member of the Ocean Studies Board of the National Academies and the Executive Board of the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×

Law of the Sea Institute, the past Chair of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, and a past Board Member and President of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade and the North American Association of Fisheries Economics. He has acted in an advisory capacity to the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS), and other Fishery Management Councils, the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, the U.S. Department of State, the Great Lakes Fishery Commission, the U.S. General Accounting Office, the National Academy of Sciences, the World Bank, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) of the United Nations, the European Union, and the governments of Australia, Chile, Morocco, New Zealand, and Oman with respect to fisheries management and development. He has also received grants from the National Science Foundation, the Sea Grant, NMFS, FAO, the United States Agency for International Development, and the Inter-American Development Bank. In 1993 he was awarded the University of Miami Rosenstiel Award for Contributions to Ocean Science for his theoretical and applied work on individual transferable quotas. In 2014, he was made a Fellow of the International Institute of Fisheries Economics and Trade.

Courtney Carothers is a Professor of fisheries in the College of Fisheries and Ocean Sciences at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. She holds a Ph.D. and an M.A. in environmental anthropology from the University of Washington (2008) and a B.A. in biology and society summa cum laude from Cornell University (2000). Dr. Carothers has devoted her career to working with fishing communities across Alaska to better understand the social and cultural dimensions of fishery systems and to improve education, research, and policy processes to better include these dimensions. Her research focuses on human–environment relationships, cultural values, equity, and well-being and has been featured in venues such as Science, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, The New York Times, and the U.S. Senate. She currently serves as a member of the Enhancing Community Resilience of the Gulf Research Program at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine.

James H. Cowan, Jr., was a Full Professor at the Louisiana State University (LSU) in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, the E.I. Abraham Distinguished Professor in Louisiana Environmental Studies, and the Director of Fisheries Science and Assessment Graduate Certificate Program. Dr. Cowan obtained both a Ph.D. (marine science), and a master’s degree (experimental statistics) while at LSU. He served on the 1999 Committee to Review Individual Fishing Quotas and the 2006 Committee on Ecosystem Effects of Fishing: Phase II—Assessments of the Extent of Ecosystem Change and the Implications for Policy. He published more than 150 papers in the academic literature and was a member of the American Fisheries Society, serving in multiple leadership positions for the organization. His professional interests included fisheries ecology, estuary-offshore coupling and predation, experimental statistics and design, biometrics, and natural and artificial reefs in the Gulf of Mexico.

Josh Eagle is the Solomon Blatt Professor of Law and the Director of the Coastal Law Field Lab at the University of South Carolina. He is a graduate of Johns Hopkins University (B.A., humanities), Colorado State University (M.S., forest sciences), and Georgetown University (J.D.), and began his legal career at the U.S. Department of Justice. Professor Eagle has published on a wide range of topics, including coastal land use, fisheries, public lands, conservation easements, and endangered species. He has been named an Atlantic Fellow in Public Policy, a Fulbright Scholar, and an international research scholar at the Peter Wall Institute for Advanced Studies. Professor Eagle has previously served on a National Research Council committee focused on techniques for measuring natural resource damages resulting from the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×

Timothy Essington is currently a Professor at the University of Washington School of Aquatic and Fishery Sciences and serves as the Director of the university’s quantitative ecology and resource management interdisciplinary graduate program. Dr. Essington earned a Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin–Madison in zoology. His expertise is quantitative modeling and statistics, fisheries ecology, and application of ecological principles to management relevant questions. He has published multiple peer-reviewed papers examining the ecological responses of fishery systems to the implementation of catch share programs.

Sherry L. Larkin is a Professor in the Food and Resource Economics Department at the Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences and the Director of the Florida Sea Grant College Program at the University of Florida (UF/IFAS). Dr. Larkin earned a Ph.D. from Oregon State University in agricultural and resource economics, an M.S. from University of Arizona, and a B.S. from Washington State University. Her expertise is in natural resource economics, including using stated and revealed preference analysis (including non-market valuation and marketing applications to labeling of wild caught fish) and using bioeconomic modelling to evaluate fisheries management regimes and policies. She served as an Associate Editor of Marine Resource Economics from 2000-2015 and the President elect and then President of the North Atlantic Association of Fisheries Economists from 2015-2019. She has previously served on the Science and Statistical Committees of both the South Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Councils.

Steven A. Murawski is a Professor and the Peter Betzer Endowed Chair of Biological Oceanography in the College of Marine Science at the University of South Florida. His research group aims to understand the impacts of human activities on the sustainability of ocean ecosystems. He served as the Director of the Center for Integrated Analysis and Modeling of Gulf Ecosystems investing the effects of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, and currently directs the Center for Ocean Mapping and Innovative Technologies, a USF-NOAA Cooperative Agreement. He received a B.S. and an M.S. in fisheries biology and a Ph.D. in fisheries and wildlife biology from the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Sean P. Powers is a Professor and the Director of the School of Marine and Environmental Sciences at the University of South Alabama and a Senior Marine Scientist at the Dauphin Island Sea Lab. He currently serves on the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council’s Standing Science and Statistical Committee having previously served as the Vice-Chair and the Chair of the committee. He also serves on the board of the State of Alabama’s Forever Wild, the Alabama Land Trust. In 2017, Dr. Powers was named the Angelia and Steven Stokes Endowed Chair in Environmental Resiliency. During the damage assessment process after Deepwater Horizon, he served as a lead Principal Investigator for the nearshore environment. Dr. Powers served on both the National Academies’ Committee on U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Water Resources, Science, Engineering, and Planning: Coastal Risk Reduction and the Committee on the Review of Marine Recreational Information Program. Currently, he is serving on the Committee on Data and Management Strategies for Recreational Fisheries with Annual Catch Limits. The majority of Dr. Powers’s research is focused on demersal fishes and benthic invertebrates in coastal and estuarine systems, particularly those that support commercial and recreational fisheries, with a primary focus on the interface of ecology, fisheries, and socioeconomics. Dr. Powers completed a SeaGrant John Knauss Marine Policy Fellowship at the National Science Foundation (1997-1998) and a post-doc at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1999-2002). He attended Loyola University (B.S. with Honors, 1990) and the University of New Orleans (M.S., 1992), and received his Ph.D. in zoology from Texas A&M University in 1997.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×

Martin D. Smith is the George M. Woodwell Distinguished Professor of Environmental Economics in the Nicholas School of the Environment at Duke University. He earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, Davis, in agricultural and resource economics (2001) and a B.A. at Stanford University in public policy (1992). Dr. Smith studies the economics of the oceans and has published research on fisheries and aquaculture, ecosystem-based management, genetically modified foods, the global seafood trade, and coastal climate change adaptation. He has served on the Scientific and Statistical Committee of the Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council, as the Editor-in-Chief of the journal Marine Resource Economics, and as a member of the National Academies’ Ocean Studies Board for two 3-year terms. He also served on the National Academies’ Committee on Understanding the Long-Term Evolution of the Coupled Natural-Human Coastal System: The Future of the U.S. Gulf Coast. He is currently a Features Editor for Review of Environmental Economics and Policy and serves on the editorial boards of the Journal of Environmental Economics and Management and the Journal of the Association of Environmental and Resource Economists. Dr. Smith has published extensively, including works in The American Economic Review, Nature, Science, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Dr. Smith has made appearances on NPR and BBC Radio to discuss seafood issues and has received national and international awards, including an Aldo Leopold Leadership Fellowship. His research has been funded by the National Science Foundation and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

Tracy Yandle is an Associate Professor of environmental sciences at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia. She earned a Ph.D. in public policy from Indiana University, an M.E.S. in environmental studies from Baylor University, and a B.A. in government from Franklin and Marshall College. Her research focuses on the interaction of property rights and governance arrangements in order to understand how policy changes individuals’ incentives and thus their behavior. Her research has been funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and the National Science Foundation. Dr. Yandle serves on the editorial board of Ecology and Society and as the Case Studies Subject Editor for Marine Resource Economics. She also serves on the Scientific and Statistical Committee and the Socio-Economic Panel for the South Atlantic Fisheries Management Council. This is Dr. Yandle’s first interaction with the National Academy of Sciences.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×
Page 185
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×
Page 186
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×
Page 187
Suggested Citation:"Appendix: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26186.
×
Page 188
The Use of Limited Access Privilege Programs in Mixed-Use Fisheries Get This Book
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A central goal of U.S. fisheries management is to control the exploitation of fish populations so that fisheries remain biologically productive, economically valuable, and socially equitable. Although the Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act led to many improvements, a number of fish populations remained overfished and some fisheries were considered economically inefficient. In response, Congress amended the Act in 2006 to allow additional management approaches, including Limited Access Privilege Programs (LAPPs) in which individuals receive a permit to harvest a defined portion of the total allowable catch for a particular fish stock.

This report examines the impacts of LAPPs on mixed-use fisheries, defined as fisheries where recreational, charter, and commercial fishing sectors target the same species or stocks. The report offers recommendations for NOAA's National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) and the Regional Fishery Management Councils (the Councils) who oversee and manage federally regulated fisheries. For each of the five mixed-use fisheries included in the report, the committee examined available fisheries data and analyses and collected testimony from fishery participants, relevant Councils, and NMFS regional experts through a series of public meetings.

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