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Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs (2022)

Chapter:Appendix A: Committee Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
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Appendix A

Committee Biographies

Mica Endsley (Chair) is president of SA Technologies and is the former chief scientist for the U.S. Air Force. She has also held the positions of visiting associate professor at Massachusetts Institute of Technology in the Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics and associate professor of industrial engineering at Texas Tech University. She was formerly an engineering specialist at the Northrop Corporation. Endsley is a fellow and past president of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She is a recognized world leader in the design, development, and evaluation of systems to support human situation awareness and decision making, and the integration of humans and automation. She has published extensively on the effects of automation and AI on human performance and situation awareness. She has authored more than 200 scientific articles and is the coauthor of Analysis and Measurement of Situation Awareness and Designing for Situation Awareness. Endsley received the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society Jack Kraft Innovator Award and the Aerospace Medical Association Kent Gillingham Award for her work in situation awareness. She is currently a member of the Board of Human-System Integration of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and has previously served on the National Academies’ Aeronautics and Space Engineering Board (2008 to 2013), as well as the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board Panel on Soldier Systems (1998 to 2000) and Panel on Human Factors in the Design of Tactical Display Systems for the Individual Soldier (1994 to 1996). She received her Ph.D. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Southern California in 1990.

Barrett S. Caldwell is professor of industrial engineering (and aeronautics and astronautics, by courtesy) at Purdue University. His research team examines and improves how people get, share, and use information well in settings including aviation, critical incident response, healthcare, and spaceflight operations. He was named in 2008 as a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. Caldwell has served on multiple panels, and in a variety of projects, associated with the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He co-organized the National Academy of Engineering U.S. Frontiers of Engineering (FOE) 2008 session on cognitive ergonomics, participated in the 2003 U.S. FOE, the 2006 German-American FOE, and the 2016 Japan-U.S. FOE. National Academies’ committee service has included panels on Human Factors Science at the Army Research Laboratory; Information Technology Automation and the U.S. Workforce; and Systems Engineering to Improve Traumatic Brain Injury Care in the Military Health System. During 2016 to 2017, Caldwell was a Jefferson science fellow at the U.S. Department of State, assigned to environment, science, technology, and health policy in the Office of Japanese Affairs. He received his Ph.D. in social psychology from the University of California, Davis, and B.S. degrees in aeronautics and astronautics and humanities from MIT.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×

Erin K. Chiou is an assistant professor of human systems engineering at Arizona State University and also directs the Automation Design Advancing People and Technology (ADAPT) Laboratory. The ADAPT Lab studies human-agent teaming in complex work environments, with a focus on social factors such as trust and accountability with automation. Recent projects have been supported by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the National Science Foundation, and include applications in security, manufacturing, and healthcare. Chiou has served as a panelist on the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine panel on human factors science at the Army Research Laboratory (2019), and as an invited expert for workshops hosted by the Office of the Director of National Intelligence (2018), the U.N. Institute for Disarmament Research (2019), Trusted Autonomous Systems Defence CRC (2019), and the Computing Community Consortium (2020). She is also the coeditor of a recent volume titled Advancing Diversity, Inclusion, and Social Justice Through Human Systems Engineering (2019, CRC Press). Chiou received her Ph.D. and M.S. in industrial and systems engineering from the University of Wisconsin–Madison, concentrating in human factors and ergonomics, with a minor in health systems. Her B.S. was completed at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign where she majored in psychology and philosophy.

Nancy Cooke is a professor of human systems engineering at Arizona State University (ASU) and directs ASU’s Center for Human, AI, and Robot Teaming. She is past president of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society and recently chaired a study panel for the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on Enhancing the Effectiveness of Team Science. Cooke was a member of the U.S. Air Force Scientific Advisory board from 2008 to 2012. She currently serves on the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s Information and Science Technology Study Group and is a member of the National Academies’ Committee on Risk Analysis for Nuclear War and Nuclear Terrorism. Her research interests include the study of individual and team cognition and its application to the development of cognitive and knowledge engineering methodologies and human-AI-robot teaming in defense operations, urban search and rescue, and distributed space operations. Her work is funded primarily by the U.S. Department of Defense. She received her Ph.D. in cognitive psychology from New Mexico State University.

Mary (Missy) Cummings is currently a professor in the Duke University Electrical and Computer Engineering Department and the director of the Humans and Autonomy Laboratory. A naval officer and military pilot from 1988 to 1999, she was one of the U.S. Navy’s first female fighter pilots. She is an American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics fellow and a member of several technology-focused national committees. Her research interests include human supervisory control, explainable artificial intelligence, human-autonomous system collaboration, human-robot interaction, human-systems engineering, and the ethical and social impact of technology. Cummings received her B.S. in mathematics from the U.S. Naval Academy, an M.S. in space systems engineering from the Naval Postgraduate School, and a Ph.D. in systems engineering from the University of Virginia.

Cleotilde Gonzalez is a research professor of decision sciences and the founding director of the Dynamic Decision Making Laboratory at Carnegie Mellon University. Her main affiliation is with the Social and Decision Sciences Department and she has additional affiliations with many other departments and centers in the university. She is a lifetime fellow of the Cognitive Science Society and the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society. She is also a member of the governing board of the Cognitive Science Society. She is associate editor of Cognitive Science and part of the editorial board of Decision, the Journal of Experimental Psychology-General, the Journal of Behavioral Decision Making, Human Factors, and the System Dynamics Review. She is widely published across many fields deriving from her contributions to the Cognitive Science field. Her work includes the development of a theory of decisions from experience called Instance-Based Learning Theory, from which many computational models have emerged, including a run-up winner of a modeling competition focused on the prediction in repeated Market Entry Games. She has been principal or co-investigator on a wide range of multimillion dollar and multiyear collaborative efforts with government and industry, including current efforts on Collaborative Research Alliances and Multi-University Research Initiative grants from the Army Research Laboratories and Army Research Office. She has mentored more than 30 postdoctoral fellows and doctoral students, many of whom have pursued successful

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×

careers in academia, government, and industry. Gonzalez received a B.Sc. and an M.B.A. from the Universidad de las Americas-Puebla, Mexico, and her M.Sc. and Ph.D. from Texas Tech University.

John D. Lee is the Emerson Electric professor at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. He investigates the issues of human-automation interaction, particularly trust in automation. He has investigated trust in domains that include unmanned aerial vehicles, maritime operations, highly automated vehicles, and deep space exploration. His work also involves assessing interface and interaction methods to enhance trust calibration, as well as statistical approaches to assess trust and user state estimation. Lee helped to edit the Handbook of Cognitive Engineering, the APA Handbook of Human-Systems Integration, and the Handbook of Human Factors for Automated, Connected, and Intelligent Vehicles, and is also a coauthor of a popular textbook Designing for People: An Introduction to Human Factors Engineering. He has served on several National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees including the Committee on Human Factors, Committee on Reducing and Preventing Teen Motor Vehicle Crashes, and the Army Research Laboratory Technical Assessment Board. Lee received a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering and an M.S. in industrial engineering from the University of Illinois, and a B.S. in mechanical engineering and B.A. in psychology from Lehigh University.

Nathan J. McNeese is an assistant professor and director of the Team Research Analytics in Computational Environments Research Group within the Human-Centered Computing Division in the School of Computing at Clemson University. He is also director of the university-wide Clemson University Data (Science) Lab. His research interests span across human-AI teaming, human-centered AI, and the development/design of human-centered collaborative tools and systems. He currently serves on multiple international/societal program and technical committees, in addition to multiple editorial boards including Human Factors. He is a previous member of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Panel on Human Factors Science, as well as previous member of the Army Research Lab HERD Technical Advisory Board. His research has received multiple best paper awards/nominations and has been published in top peer-reviewed human-computer interaction and human factors venues more than 90 times. In addition, he has acquired more than $14 million in research funding from agencies such as the National Science Foundation, the Office of Naval Research, the Air Force Office of Scientific Research, and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. McNeese received a Ph.D. in information sciences and technology from Pennsylvania State University.

Christopher Miller is now the chief scientist and a co-owner of Smart Information Flow Technologies (SIFT), a small business doing human-systems integration research and development for more than 20 years. He is one of the co-creators of the Playbook® concept and has been involved in all phases of its development across multiple customers and applications. He has substantial project management experience, including leading more than 55 efforts in human-systems and human-automation interaction for Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the U.S. Navy, U.S. Army, U.S. Air Force, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration—both as prime and subcontractor—as well as in medical, industrial processing, and commercial aviation domains. Prior to joining SIFT, Miller led a series of projects as the human factors fellow at Honeywell Technology Center where he was principal investigator for Honeywell’s role in the U.S. Army’s Rotorcraft Pilot’s Associate ACTD Program and for Honeywell’s effort in automated learning for task and information requirements for the U.S. Air Force and DARPA’s Pilot’s Associate Program. He won Honeywell’s highest technical achievement award for his work in designing the intermodule and human communications aspects of the Abnormal Event Guidance and Information System—an associate-like system for use in oil refineries. He has also provided consulting services to Australia, Canada, and the UK on various defense research projects, and to the European Science Foundation in prioritizing research for autonomy support for deep space missions. Miller is the author of more than 140 publications in these fields and has served as chair of 17 conference sessions or symposia and has given invited addresses to NATO Research and Technology Organization advisory boards, the European Space Foundation, and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. He has previously served on multiple National Academies’ activities including (most recently) helping to organize the Workshop on Human-Automation Interaction Considerations for Unmanned Aerial System Integration in 2018. Miller received his Ph.D. and M.A. degrees

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×

in cognitive psychology (with an emphasis on linguistics and language acquisition and use) from the University of Chicago and a B.A. from Pomona College.

Emilie M. Roth is owner and principal scientist of Roth Cognitive Engineering, a small company that conducts research and application in the areas of human factors and applied cognitive psychology (cognitive engineering). Her work involves analysis of human problem solving and decision making in real-world environments (e.g., military command and control; intelligence analysis; nuclear power plant emergencies; railroad operations; healthcare), and the impact of support systems (e.g., computerized procedures; alarm systems; advanced graphical displays; new forms of decision support and automation) on cognitive performance. Roth has supported analysis and design of first-of-a-kind systems, including design and manning of envisioned Army Future Vertical Lift; design and evaluation of next-generation nuclear power plant control rooms; and design of computer-based support systems for flight planning and monitoring for USTRANSCOM and the Air Mobility Command. She is a fellow of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, is an associate editor of the Journal of Cognitive Engineering and Decision Making, and serves on the editorial board of Human Factors. She participated in the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Committee on Human-System Design Support for Changing Technology (in 2006), and the National Academies’ committee examining lessons learned from the Fukushima nuclear accident for improving safety and security of U.S. nuclear plants (2012 to 2016), and is currently a member of the Board on Human-Systems Integration at the National Academies. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, in cognitive psychology.

William B. Rouse is research professor in the McCourt School of Public Policy at Georgetown University, as well as senior fellow in the office of the senior vice president for research, and professor emeritus and former chair of the School of Industrial and Systems Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology. His research focuses on understanding and managing complex public-private systems such as healthcare delivery, higher education, transportation, and national security, with emphasis on mathematical and computational modeling of these systems for the purpose of policy design and analysis. He was chair of the Committee on Human Factors before it became the Board on Human-Systems Integration. Over the past four decades, he has served as chair, co-chair, or member of roughly 40 National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine study committees, ad hoc committees, and other initiatives. He received his B.S. in mechanical engineering from the University of Rhode Island, and his S.M. and Ph.D., both in systems engineering, from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×
Page115
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×
Page116
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×
Page117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26355.
×
Page118
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Although artificial intelligence (AI) has many potential benefits, it has also been shown to suffer from a number of challenges for successful performance in complex real-world environments such as military operations, including brittleness, perceptual limitations, hidden biases, and lack of a model of causation important for understanding and predicting future events. These limitations mean that AI will remain inadequate for operating on its own in many complex and novel situations for the foreseeable future, and that AI will need to be carefully managed by humans to achieve their desired utility.

Human-AI Teaming: State-of-the-Art and Research Needs examines the factors that are relevant to the design and implementation of AI systems with respect to human operations. This report provides an overview of the state of research on human-AI teaming to determine gaps and future research priorities and explores critical human-systems integration issues for achieving optimal performance.

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