National Academies Press: OpenBook

Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects (2022)

Chapter: Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables

« Previous: 4 Cigar Marketing and Perceptions
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×

Chapter 4 Annex

Evidence Tables

The following table provides descriptive and methodological information on the studies cited in Chapter 4; study findings and results are discussed in the chapter proper. See the Chapter 4 reference list for full citations.

Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×

TABLE 4A-1 Descriptive and Methodological Information on Studies Cited in Chapter 4

Reference Data Source Year(s) Data Collected Study Design Study Participants Sample Size Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied Definitions of Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied
Campbell et al., 2019. PMID: 30206006 Survey 2016 Cross-sectional survey Adult patients enrolled in addiction treatment centers 1,153 Cigars, little filtered cigars/cigarillos, smokeless tobacco, and e-cigarettes Not specified
Casseus et al., 2016. PMID: 26604260 Online survey Not specified Cross-sectional survey Convenience sample of adult cigarette smokers (smoked ≥1 cigarette per day) ages 18–64 344 Products shown were machine-injected RYO cigarettes, Winchester little cigar, Santa Fe filtered cigarillo, Black & Mild filtered cigarillo, Nat Sherman cigarette, and Nat Sherman Black and Gold cigarette Not specified
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Corey et al., 2018. PMID: 29059423 PATH Wave 1 2013–2014 National longitudinal study U.S. adults 32,320 Filtered cigars, cigarillos, or traditional cigars, which were further categorized as premium or nonpremium “Traditional cigars contain tightly rolled tobacco that is wrapped in a tobacco leaf. Some common brands of cigars include Macanudo, Romeo y Julieta, and Arturo Fuente, but there are many others.”

“Cigarillos and filtered cigars are smaller than traditional cigars. They are usually brown. Some are the same size as cigarettes, and some come with tips or filters. Some common brands are Black & Mild, Swisher Sweets, Dutch Masters, Phillies Blunts, Prime Time, and Winchester.”
Dickinson et al., 2016. PMID: 26826209 Focus groups conducted in five U.S. cities 2014 Focus groups conducted in five U.S. cities U.S. adults 123 Cigars, cigarillos, and little cigars Not specified
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Reference Data Source Year(s) Data Collected Study Design Study Participants Sample Size Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied Definitions of Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied
Elton-Marshall et al., 2020. PMID: 32145496 PATH Waves 1 and 2 2013–2014; 2014–2015 National longitudinal study U.S. adults 32,320; 28,362 Traditional cigars, filtered cigars, cigarillos, waterpipe, smokeless tobacco, pipe, and e-cigarettes See Corey et al., 2018
Fong et al., 2019. PMID: 30502927 PATH Wave 1 2013–2014 National longitudinal study Population-based, representative sample of U.S. adults 32,320 Traditional cigars, cigarillos and filtered little cigars, traditional smokeless tobacco, and e-cigarettes See Corey et al., 2018
Kasza et al., 2017. PMID: 28121512 PATH Wave 1 2013–2014 National longitudinal study Population-based, representative sample of U.S. youth 13,651 Traditional cigars, cigarillos and filtered little cigars, traditional smokeless tobacco, and e-cigarettes See Corey et al., 2018
Nayak et al., 2017. PMID: 28579496 TPRPS 2014, 2015 Probability-based cross-sectional survey Lesbian, gay, and bisexual adults (compared to heterosexual adults) 11,768 E-cigarettes, “large, premium cigars,” little cigars/cigarillos/filtered cigars, and waterpipe (hookah) Not specified
Parker et al., 2018. PMID: 30397167 PATH Waves 1 and 2 2013–2014; 2014–2015 National longitudinal study Youth ages 12–17 10,081 Cigarettes, e-cigarettes, cigars (traditional cigars, cigarillos, and filtered cigars combined together), pipes, waterpipe, and smokeless tobacco See Corey et al., 2018
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Smith et al., 2007. PMID: 17763115 Cross-sectional Internet survey 2004 Cross-sectional Internet survey Online convenience sample of college students 411 Nicotine patch, nicotine gum, nicotine water, nicotine lollipop, nicotine inhaler, ultralight cigarettes, waterpipe, light cigarettes, cigarillos, cigars, and smokeless tobacco (relative to cigarettes) Not specified
Smith-Simone et al., 2008. PMID: 18783890 Cross-sectional Internet survey 2004 Cross-sectional Internet survey Online convenience sample of college students 411 Cigarette smoking, waterpipe tobacco use, and cigar smoking Not specified
Strong et al., 2019. PMID: 30623806 PATH Wave 1 2013–2014 National longitudinal study Population-based, representative sample of U.S. youth 13,651 All cigar types (little cigars/cigarillos, filtered cigars, and traditional cigars) were combined See Corey et al., 2018
Tucker et al., 2020. PMID: 31396821 Sample from 25 street and service sites in Los Angeles County 2017–2018 Survey Probability sample of youth experiencing homelessness in Los Angeles County, California 426 Past 30-day use of other tobacco (natural cigarettes, e-cigarettes, little cigars/cigarillos, and cigars) Not specified
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Reference Data Source Year(s) Data Collected Study Design Study Participants Sample Size Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied Definitions of Types of Cigars (Including Premium) and/or Tobacco Products Studied
Wackowski and Delnevo, 2016. PMID: 26304709 National Young Adult Health Survey 2011 Stratified random digit dial cell phone survey Nationally representative sample of young adults ages 18–34 2,871 Cigars, e-cigarettes, waterpipe, snuff, dip, chew, snus, and menthol cigarettes relative to cigarettes; excluded filtered little cigars but included large cigars and cigarillos “Regular cigars can be large cigars or smaller in size such as cigarillos. They are not little cigars that have spongy filters like cigarettes. They are usually sold individually or in packs of 5 or 8. Some common brands are Black and Mild’s, Swisher Sweets cigarillos, and Phillies Blunts, but there are others” (p. 329).
Weaver et al., 2016. PMID: 26560309 TPRPS 2014 Probability-based cross-sectional survey Representative noninstitutionalized U.S. adults 5,717 “Large, premium cigars” “Large, premium cigars”
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Yerger et al., 2001. PMID: 11211649 Focus groups 1998 Focus groups Black/African American youth ages 14–18 50 Cigar (types not specified) “The word ‘cigar’ encompasses several types and sizes of smokable noncigarette tobacco products, their common factor being a nonpaper, tobacco leaf or tobacco-containing outer wrapper” (p. 316).

NOTE: PATH = Population Assessment of Tobacco and Health Study; RYO = roll-your-own; TPRPS = Tobacco Products and Risk Perceptions Survey.

Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 197
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 198
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 199
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 200
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 201
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 202
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 203
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 4 Annex: Evidence Tables." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26421.
×
Page 204
Next: 5 Health Effects of Premium Cigars »
Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $55.00 Buy Ebook | $44.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The early to mid-1990s saw a large surge in U.S. cigar consumption, including premium cigars. Based on recent import data, premium cigar use may be increasing, though they currently make up a small percent of the total U.S. cigar market. Premium cigars have also been the subject of legal and regulatory efforts for the past decade. In 1998, the National Cancer Institute undertook a comprehensive review of available knowledge about cigars - the only one to date. The resulting research recommendations have largely not been addressed, and many of the identified information gaps persist. Furthermore, there is no single, consistent definition of premium cigars, making research challenging.

In response, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health commissioned the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to convene a committee of experts to address this issue. The resulting report, Premium Cigars: Patterns of Use, Marketing, and Health Effects, includes 13 findings, 24 conclusions, and nine priority research recommendations and assesses the state of evidence on premium cigar characteristics, current patterns of use, marketing and perceptions of the product, and short- long-term health effects.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!