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Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels (2021)

Chapter:Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
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Page 117
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
×
Page117
Page 118
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
×
Page118
Page 119
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
×
Page119
Page 120
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Study Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2021. Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26447.
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Page120

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115 Eugene A. van Rynbach, Chair, is the Chairman of Herbert Engineering Corp. (HEC). He joined HEC in 2005 after an extensive background in the ship operation and engineering fields. At HEC he has worked on major ship design and conversion projects, including designing new training ships for the U.S. State Maritime Academies for the U.S. Maritime Administra- tion (MARAD); working on a major conversion and upgrade of the FPSO EnQuest Producer; overseeing the design of a suite of ro-ro vessel designs for MARAD and other organizations for American Marine Highways; acting as the owner’s technical advisor and carrying out plan approval for multiple new construction projects; and designing many modifications, updating stability documentation, and advising on major repairs for com- mercial ships. Prior to joining HEC, he worked for 15 years as the Manager of Technical Services for the container ship operator Sea-Land Service and its offshoot U.S. Ship Management. His areas of responsibility included vessel new construction, conversions, major modifications, and technical engineering, including stability documentation. Earlier work included time with the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) doing plan review for mobile offshore drilling units and several years of seagoing experience as a United States Coast Guard (USCG)-licensed marine engineer. He is a member of ABS and the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME). He received the Linnard Prize from SNAME for presenting the best paper at the 1995 SNAME annual meeting. Over the past 5 years, he has served on three Transportation Research Board committees for USCG: the Commit- tee to Revise and Update U.S. Coast Guard Ship Stability Regulations (as chair); the Committee on Polar Icebreaker Cost Assessment (as a member); Appendix A Study Committee Biographical Information

116 OPTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE SAFETY OF DUKW TYPE AMPHIBIOUS VESSELS and the Committee on Impact of U.S. Coast Guard Regulations on U.S. Flag Registry (as a member). He received a B.S. in mechanical engineering with a specialization in naval architecture from the University of California, Berkeley, and an M.S. in transportation management from the State Uni- versity of New York Maritime College. CAPT Scott Anderson, United States Coast Guard (USCG) (retired), is currently a financial advisor for First Command Financial Services. He retired from USCG in 2020 as the Sector Commander and Captain of the Port of the USCG Fifth District Sector Delaware Bay. In serving as Captain of the Port for 3 years, he directed operational units conducting all USCG missions in the sector. He served as the Deputy Sector Commander for the 2 years prior. While in the USCG Ninth District between 2011 and 2015, he served as the Chief of Inspections and Investigations providing over- sight and support for regulatory inspections and casualty investigations. He also served as the Acting Chief of Prevention for 8 months. In Sector Lower Mississippi River, he served as the Deputy Sector Commander and the Prevention Department Head between 2008 and 2011. In Sector New Orleans, he served as the Assistant Chief, Inspection Division between 2005 and 2008. He holds an M.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the University of Michigan and a B.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the USCG Academy. CAPT Robert K. Cook retired from Military Sealift Command (MSC) Atlantic after serving on Underway Replenishment Ships as the Department Head, where he oversaw dry-dock operations and ship repair work both in domestic and foreign shipyards. He also served on an MSC Hydrographic Surveillance ship and the USNS Harkness, after which he received the Navy Humanitarian Service award for work done in the Gulf of Suez and the Red Sea during Operation Intense Look. In 1993, he became one of the first African American U.S. Marine pilots in modern times when he became a partner in the Pilot’s Association for the Bay and River Delaware. In 1994, he and five other African American SUNY Maritime College graduates formed the Organization of Black Maritime Graduates (OBMG). He has served as the president of OBMG since its inception, where he provides oppor tunities for African Americans and other minorities in such areas as recruitment for the maritime industry, educational partnerships, scholar- ships, mentoring, and networking for students and graduates. In 2014, he was inducted into SUNY Maritime College’s Heritage Hall. He is a Trustee on the Board of Directors of the Maritime Academy Charter School in Philadelphia, a Port of Philadelphia Marine Society Board member, as well as an active supporter of the United States Coast Guard (USCG) Founda- tion. He is also a member of the Transportation Research Board’s Marine

APPENDIX A 117 Board. He graduated from the State University of New York (SUNY) Maritime College with a B.S. in physical oceanography and meteorology. He also graduated with an Unlimited USCG 3rd Officer’s license. Timothy A. Graul retired as the Principal of Timothy Graul Marine Design (TGMD) after a 50-year career in naval architecture and marine engineer- ing. While at TGMD, Mr. Graul designed many ferries, small passenger vessels, crewboats, fast supply boats, workboats, and research boats. He specialized in issues of lengthening, repowering, tonnage, and stability. In 1991, TGMD was chosen to design the three-masted schooner S/V Denis Sullivan, the official flagship of Wisconsin, which was completed in 2000. Before establishing his own firm in 1981, he managed commercial and workboat programs for Peterson Builders, Inc., in Sturgeon Bay, Wisconsin, a builder of ships and boats in steel, wood, aluminum, and fiberglass. Prior to that, he was the Vice President of Engineering and Sales at Grafton Boat Company, Inc., in Grafton, Illinois, where he was responsible for the design of more than 200 small military and service craft. As an associate member of the Passenger Vessel Association (PVA), he was active in several ad-hoc committees and task forces that addressed stability, handicap access, and passenger weight issues. He has authored and presented papers for various outlets, including the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME), Marine Technology, Workboat Show seminars, IBEX technical sessions, and PVA annual meetings. Mr. Graul has performed nonexclusive tonnage admeasurement for Det Norske Veritas and Germanischer Lloyd. Throughout his career, he has served as a mentor and a judge of design projects at the U.S. Naval Academy, Webb Institute, and the SNAME Lisnyk Student Ship Design Competition. He received his B.S. in naval archi tecture and marine engineering from the University of Michigan. Jennifer Kollmer is currently the Chief of Lifecycle Engineering at Rolls- Royce Marine North America where, as a member of the Engineering Leadership team, she is responsible for integrating all operational aspects and considerations for products at all phases of the lifecycle on behalf of the Chief Engineer for the U.S. Navy and United States Coast Guard programs. Her roles have involved in-service engineering efforts, and her current work with the Rolls-Royce Defense group involves functional management of the North America Naval Engineering for Services team. She started her career as a naval architect with Seaworthy Systems, Inc., in 1991 where she was involved with the new design and construction management of ships and small passenger vessels (Subchapter K and T) for clients such as New York City’s Department of Environmental Protection, Casco Bay Lines, Maine State Ferry Service, California Department of Transportation, and Cape May Lewes Ferry. Her other engineering program efforts with Seaworthy

118 OPTIONS FOR IMPROVING THE SAFETY OF DUKW TYPE AMPHIBIOUS VESSELS supported the company’s National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administra- tion (NOAA) and Military Sealift Command naval architecture and marine engineering support contracts and the Long Island Sound Waterborne Transportation Plan, which was developed between 2003–2005 for several tri-state transportation organizations. Rolls-Royce purchased Seaworthy Systems in 2007. She is active with the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers (SNAME), serving as New England Section Chairman, and on the Papers Committee for the International Conference on Marine Engineering Systems (ICMES). She holds a B.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the Webb Institute of Naval Architecture. Maggie Nate is the Department Manager for Survivability at Gibbs & Cox, where she leads a team of engineers that focuses on specialty engineering, including areas such as shock, vibration, electromagnetic interference, sus- ceptibility, vulnerability, and recoverability. Prior to joining Gibbs & Cox, she worked at Alion Science and Technology as a Senior Test Engineer where she reviewed marine system designs to assess for survivability and safety. She serves on the editorial boards for Marine Technology Magazine and the Journal of Ship Production and Design and as the Chair for the Chesapeake Section of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engi- neers. She holds a B.S. in aerospace engineering and marine engineering from Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University. RADM Joel R. Whitehead, United States Coast Guard (USCG) (retired), is the President of J. Whitehead & Associates, Inc., a transportation- related consulting firm based in New Orleans. His focus is on international and U.S. maritime regulatory compliance, support to admiralty law firms through expert witness reporting and trial testimony, hazardous materials issues, port development (LNG [liquified natural gas], traditional, and rec- reational) and governmental relations. In his last military assignment from 2006 to 2009, he served as the Commander of the Eighth Coast Guard Dis- trict in New Orleans, where he was responsible for operations and oversight of the maritime and offshore oil industry in 26 states and the entire Gulf of Mexico. After retiring in 2009 as a Rear Admiral from USCG with 38 years of service, he served until 2011 as the Vice President, National Security Sector of SRA International, Inc. His operational career was primarily as a marine safety specialist. Trained as a marine inspector and a casualty investigator at the Marine Inspection Office, New York, he conducted hun- dreds of inspections and investigations worldwide for more than 10 years on commercial vessels, passenger vessels, barges, offshore supply vessels, and oil rigs. In Washington, D.C., he drafted USCG regulations imple- menting the International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships ( MARPOL) and participated in international negotiations relating to

APPENDIX A 119 MARPOL at the International Maritime Organization in London. He also served as the Commanding Officer of the Marine Safety Office and Captain of the Port of Boston from 1999–2001 where he had oversight of the largest LNG import facility in the United States. He is the Immediate Past President of the Inter national Propeller Club of the United States, and a member of the Board of Directors of the New Orleans Propeller Club. From 1996– 1997, he was a National Security Fellow at the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University in Cambridge, Massachusetts. He holds merchant marine licenses as Master of Vessels of less than 1,600 Gross Tons upon Oceans and as 2nd Mate of Unlimited Tons upon Oceans. He holds a B.S. in history and government from the USCG Academy and an M.P.A. in public administration from the Rockefeller College of Public Affairs & Policy at the State University of New York at Albany. John Womack has practiced in the small commercial vessel field for 34 years, principally in the area of small passenger vessels. During this time, he has worked in all aspects of small commercial vessel design, con- struction, and repair from the conceptual design, through construction, to final inspections and sea trials. Design responsibilities include all areas of a vessel’s stability, structures, machinery and piping systems, electrical systems, joinery, and outfitting. Projects include the design of more than 30 vessels, including dinner vessels, overnight cruise ships, car ferries, and small oil and work barges. Current projects are the design of the latest generation of Western Rivers and small coastal overnight cruise ships. He also has worked in many aspects of commercial fisheries, including vessel, plant, and equipment design and operations; fishing vessel stability analy- sis; stock assessments; habitat issues; and crew safety training. He is an active member of the Society of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers and has served as the Co-Chair of the Small Working Vessel Technical and Research Panel. Previously, he served as the naval architect representative on the United States Coast Guard’s (USCG’s) voluntary Commercial Fishing Industry Safety Advisory Committee, working to assist USCG in develop- ing new regulations, inspection programs, and voluntary safety. He holds a B.S. and an M.S. in naval architecture and marine engineering from the University of Michigan.

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To ensure the safety of passengers and crew on DUKWs — amphibious vehicles also referred to as duck boats — the United States Coast Guard (USCG) should issue a range of new guidelines and requirements.

TRB’s Special Report 342: Options for Improving the Safety of DUKW Type Amphibious Vessels recommends that the USCG use a consistent risk-assessment methodology and update its regulations and enforcement practices in a way that reflects the variable levels of risk to passengers and crew.

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