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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Appendix C

Speaker Biographical Sketches

Richard Berman, M.B.A., M.P.H., is the Associate Vice President for Strategic Initiatives for Innovation and Research at the University of South Florida, visiting social entrepreneurship professor in the Muma College of Business, and a professor in the institute for Advanced Discovery & Innovation. He is currently an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine in Washington, DC, and is a board member for Emblem Health. He is a member of the Seeds of Peace Board of Directors, a board member for the Savannah Centre for Diplomacy, Democracy and Development in Abuja, Nigeria and CATAYS, Inc. Additionally, he is the vice-chair of the board of directors for OIC in Florida. Previous organizations in which he has served on the board of directors include the Lillian Vernon Corporation, the Westchester Jewish Chronicle (Chairman of the Advisory Board), the American Jewish Committee (Westchester Chapter), and the March of Dimes. Previously, Mr. Berman has worked as a management consultant for McKinsey & Company, the Executive Vice President of NYU Medical Center and Professor of Health Care Management at the NYU School of Medicine. He served as the Special Advisor to the leader of the African Union-United Nations Peace Keeping Mission in Darfur. He has also held various roles at Korn Ferry International, Howe-Lewis International, served in two cabinet positions in New York State Government, and the U.S. Department of Health Education and Welfare. In 1995, Mr. Berman was selected by Manhattanville College to serve as its tenth President. Mr. Berman is credited with the turnaround of the College, where he served until 2009. Mr. Berman received his B.B.A., M.B.A., and M.P.H. from the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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University of Michigan and holds honorary doctorates from Manhattanville College and New York Medical College University.

Mary Jo Bondy D.H.Ed., M.H.S., PA-C, is the Chief Executive Officer at the Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA). A distinguished clinician, educational leader, and innovator, in February 2020 she became the first PA to serve as the CEO of PAEA, where she leads a staff of 40 in serving the more than 250 member programs and meeting the needs of more than 3,000 individual faculty. Following her graduation from the Duke University PA Program in 1993, she worked in many clinical settings and specialties, including in family medicine, emergency medicine, internal medicine, and orthopedics. She also served as a clinical preceptor for PA students for many years and was awarded the Duke University PA Program Preceptor Award in 2001. She began her career as an educator as a regional clinical coordinator for the Duke PA Program, in this role she helped recruit and develop potential students and preceptors for the South East Area Health Education Center (SEAHEC) in Wilmington, NC. In 2003 she moved to Maryland to become academic coordinator of the Anne Arundel Community College PA Program, and in 2007 she became the program director. Dr. Bondy earned a D.H.Ed. from AT Still University in May 2011.

Toby Brooks, Ph.D., M.A., is the Program Director and an Associate Professor in the Master of Athletic Training Program at the Texas Tech University Health Science Center in Lubbock. A native of Golconda, Illinois, Brooks holds a B.S. in athletic training from Southern Illinois University Carbondale and an M.A. and a Ph.D. in Teaching & Teacher Education from the University of Arizona. Brooks has worked as an athletic trainer and/or strength and conditioning coach with numerous professional, collegiate, and high school athletics programs and has authored more than a dozen books and 20+ peer-reviewed articles and presentations in the field. An entrepreneur at heart, he founded and operates both NiTROHype, LLC and Performance Fasteners, LLC. He is a two-time participant in the NSF Regional iCorps competition, completed the 2019 iLaunch competition, and was a member of the 2020 cohort of the TTU Innovation Hub Accelerator Program.

Reamer L. Bushardt, Pharm.D., PA-C, DFAAPA, is a tenured educator, researcher, clinician, and administrator with experience in rural, community-based practice and with faculty service within three academic medical centers. He is professor and senior associate dean in the School of Medicine and Health Sciences at The George Washington University in Washington, DC. In this role, he oversees departments and centers comprising more

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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than 40 programs in the health professions and translational sciences. He is licensed as a physician assistant and pharmacist and has specialized training and experience in caring for patients with emphasis on management of chronic illness and interventions to address inappropriate polypharmacy and drug injury. He regularly teaches and mentors trainees in the areas of pharmacology and clinical research. He is principal investigator for the GW Health Careers Opportunity Program, a health care workforce development program funded by the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration. He is director of Translational Workforce Development in the Clinical Translational Science Institute–Children’s Network (CTSI-CN), funded by the National Institutes of Health’s National Center for Advancing Translational Science. The CTSI-CN is a partnership between the Children’s National Health System and The George Washington University. Dr. Bushardt is a director-at-large on the board of the Physician Assistant Education Association. He is editor-in-chief emeritus for the Journal of the American Academy of Physician Assistants. He previously served as a department chair at the Wake Forest School of Medicine and as associate vice president for workforce innovation at the Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center in Winston-Salem, NC. He was also associate professor and division chief for physician assistant studies at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston.

JaNeen E. Cross, D.S.W., M.S.W., M.B.A., is a Social Work HEALS Policy Fellow at the National Association of Social Workers (NASW). She is also an Assistant Clinical Professor at Howard University. Dr. Cross operates a private practice, Mays Family Therapy, providing outpatient mental and behavioral health services. Prior to serving as a HEALS Policy Fellow and Professor, Dr. Cross was a medical social worker at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Newborn Intensive Care Unit for 15 years. Dr. Cross provides workshop presentations at health care organizations and professional conferences. She serves as an expert on perinatal health workgroups and advisory panels. Dr. Cross is the President of the National Association of Perinatal Social Workers (NAPSW) and serves on the board of directors for the National Perinatal Association (NPA). Dr. Cross received her Master of Social Work at Temple University, Masters of Business Administration at Rosemont College, and Doctorate of Clinical Social Work at the University of Pennsylvania.

Darrin D’Agostino, D.O., M.P.H., M.B.A., is the Provost and Chief Academic Officer at Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center (TTUHSC). D’Agostino comes to TTUHSC from Kansas City University, where he was the executive dean of the College of Osteopathic Medicine and vice provost of Health Affairs. He previously was at the University of North Texas

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Health Science Center in Fort Worth, where he served as associate dean of Community Health and Innovation, and professor of medicine. He was also chairman of the Department of Medicine at UNT for 8 years.

Prior to that, D’Agostino held positions as program director for the Osteopathic Internal Medicine Residency and director of Osteopathic Medical Education for both the University of Connecticut School of Medicine in Farmington, Connecticut, and Hartford Hospital in Hartford, Connecticut.

D’Agostino earned a Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine from New York Institute of Technology, a Master of Business Administration from the University of Texas, Dallas, a Master of Public Health from the University of Connecticut, and a Bachelor of Science in Psychology from Union College. He has served in leadership and committee positions on the local, regional, and national levels and has led a number of community health and clinical outreach initiatives. His research has focused on issues of health equity within minority populations.

Clese Erikson, MPAff, is the Deputy Director of the Health Workforce Research Center on Health Equity in Health Professions Education at The George Washington University (GW) and a member of the senior leadership team of the Fitzhugh Mullan Institute for Health Workforce Equity. She has published peer review articles on primary care and specialty specific workforce issues, consumer interest in seeing nurse practitioners and physician assistants, workforce implications of new care delivery models, and on medical school enrollment trends. Prior to joining GW, Ms. Erikson was senior director of the Center for Workforce Studies at the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) where she was responsible for overseeing the Center’s research strategy, directed efforts on how workforce needs are evolving under new payment and delivery models and regularly convened workforce researchers to enhance methods and dissemination of findings. She is currently chairing the 16th International Health Workforce Conference and has had past leadership roles on various other workforce conferences including chairing the AcademyHealth Annual Research Meeting Workforce Theme and the Health Workforce Interest Group. Ms. Erikson was also a founding member of the leadership team of a student learning collaborative on hot spotting sponsored by the Camden Coalition, Primary Care Progress, and the AAMC and is now a part of the advisory committee. Prior to joining the AAMC, Ms. Erikson was director of research for the American Medical Group Association where she focused on patient safety and quality improvement initiatives and patient and provider satisfaction studies.

Jody Frost, P.T., D.P.T., Ph.D., FNAP (Planning Committee Co-Chair) is currently an Education Consultant and Facilitator with expertise in strategic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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planning, educational assessment, consensus building, leadership development training programs, professionalism, and interprofessional education. After 25 years, she retired as the Lead Academic Affairs Specialist and founding Program Director, APTA Education Leadership Institute Fellowship at the American Physical Therapy Association. Dr. Frost facilitated initiatives in physical therapy academic/clinical education, clinical performance assessments, professionalism and related assessments, interprofessional education, and higher education leadership. Her publications and presentations are reflective of these areas of expertise. Dr. Frost received APTA’s Education Section President’s Award and most recently honored as Education Section’s 21st Pauline Cerasoli Lecturer in 2018. Dr. Frost is a Distinguished Fellow of the National Academy of Practice (NAP), founding member and Vice Chair of NAP’s PT Academy, and the immediate past-president. She serves as a Community Moderator for the National Center for Interprofessional Practice and a manuscript reviewer for the Journal of Physical Therapy Education and Physiotherapy Theory and Practice. Dr. Frost received her bachelors in physical therapy from Ithaca College, master’s in counseling and personnel studies from Rowan University, Ph.D. from Temple University, and D.P.T. from Marymount University. She was a tenured faculty member, Director of Clinical Education, and Assistant Chair at Temple University with past experiences as Physical Therapy Department Director, clinical educator and coordinator at pediatric and orthopedic/ sports medicine facilities.

Pamela Jeffries, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, ANEF, Professor and Dean of The George Washington University School of Nursing, is internationally known for her research and work in nursing education and simulation. Throughout the academic community, she is well regarded for her scholarly contributions to the development of innovative teaching strategies, experiential learning techniques, new pedagogies, and the delivery of content using technology. Her accomplishments have been recognized through prestigious teaching and research awards and honors from a number of national and international organizations including NLN, AACN, Sigma Theta Tau International, and the International Nursing Association of Clinical Simulations and Learning.

Kimberly D. Lomis, M.D., is Vice President for Undergraduate Medical Education Innovations at the American Medical Association. In that capacity, she guides the Accelerating Change in Medical Education (ACE) consortium of 37 medical schools, impacting approximately 25,000 medical students across the United States. Dr. Lomis is invested in competency-based medical education. She previously served as Associate Dean for Undergraduate Medical Education at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, where she

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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guided a major revision of the medical school curriculum that included implementation of a comprehensive competency-based assessment program. Dr. Lomis also served as director of the national pilot of the Association of American Medical Colleges Core Entrustable Professional Activities for Entering Residency. Dr. Lomis trained in general surgery at Vanderbilt University Medical Center from 1992–1997 and practiced until 2012. She retains an appointment at Vanderbilt University as adjunct Professor of Surgery and Medical Education & Administration.

Dawn M. Mancuso, MAM, CAE, FASAE, is the Executive Director of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry. After initially working in the communications field, Ms. Mancuso has been a nonprofit manager for more than 30 years. Prior to working for ASCO, she served as the CEO of the Hydrocephalus Association and the Association of Air Medical Services and its supporting foundation, the MedEvac Foundation International. She has an undergraduate degree in International Relations from Georgetown University and a Master’s Degree in Association Management from The George Washington University. She is a frequent presenter at association management conferences, and has been published in magazines such as Association, Executive Update, and other nonprofit management publications. She is a past board member of the American Society of Association Executives (ASAE), and is the author of one of the chapters of Professional Practices in Association Management, the closest thing to a textbook for those in the association management profession. She also worked with Jim Collins (author of Good to Great) as part of the research team and one of the research authors of the book 7 Measures of Success: What Remarkable Associations Do That Others Don’t, published in 2006. Ms. Mancuso earned the CAE (Certified Association Executive) designation from ASAE in 1991, and was named a Fellow of ASAE in March of 2001.

Mary Lynn McPherson, Pharm.D., M.A., M.D.E., BCPS, C.P.E., is a Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and Science at the University of Maryland. She serves as a consultant pharmacist for both local and national hospice and palliative care programs, and has designed a critical thinking process for appropriate drug use in end-of-life patients. She has served on the Board of the Hospice Network of Maryland, chairing the Education and Outreach Committee. She also served on the Board of the Maryland Pain Initiative and the Advisory Board of the American Society of Pain Educators. Dr. McPherson teaches extensively in the PharmD curriculum on pain management and end-of-life care, including didactic and experiential content. McPherson also serves as a primary care pharmacist and Director of Pharmacotherapy Services at University Care Waxter in Baltimore. She also developed one of the first and few palliative care

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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pharmacy residencies in the United States. Dr. McPherson is a Fellow in the American Pharmacists Association, American Society of Health-Systems Pharmacists and American Society of Consultant Pharmacists. She has received many honors for her work, including the American Pharmacists Association Distinguished Achievement Award in Specialized Practice and the Maryland Pharmacists Association Innovative Practice Award. She has written three books, and many chapters and peer-reviewed articles on pain management, palliative care, and other topics.

Suzanne Miyamoto, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, is the CEO of the American Academy of Nursing (Academy). The Academy’s mission is to serve the public and the nursing profession by advancing health policy, practice, and science through organizational excellence and effective nursing leadership. With nearly two decades of policy, advocacy, and leadership experience, Dr. Miyamoto directs the internal operations to help the organization achieve its mission, vision, and strategic plan. Dr. Miyamoto is highly regarded for her expertise in health care and education policy as well as her leadership and successful development of advocacy-based coalitions. Prior to her position at the Academy, Dr. Miyamoto served as the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s (AACN) Chief Policy Officer. Starting at AACN in 2006, Dr. Miyamoto supported the membership as a policy analyst, advocate, and strategist at the federal level. She simultaneously led the Nursing Community Coalition—the largest national nursing coalition focused on inserting the voice of the profession in health policy discussions—from 2008-2018. During this time, Dr. Miyamoto worked on such critical legislation as the Higher Education Reauthorization Act in 2008, the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act in 2009, the Affordable Care Act in 2010, and most recently the Substance Use-Disorder Prevention that Promotes Opioid Recovery and Treatment (SUPPORT) for Patients and Communities Act in 2018. Currently, Dr. Miyamoto is an adjunct assistant professor at Georgetown University, School of Nursing and Health Studies and the University of Maryland, School of Nursing. She has held prior academic positions at the Schools of Nursing for the University of Michigan, University of New Mexico, The George Washington University, Marymount University, and Johns Hopkins University. Dr. Miyamoto is a member of the Editorial Board for the journal Policy, Politics & Nursing Practice, and the National Minority Quality Forum’s Advisory Board. She is the Host and Executive Producer of Inside the Bubble—A Health Policy Podcast. Previously, she held roles at the state and federal level with the National Institutes of Health, the State Commission on Patient Safety for the Michigan Health and Safety Coalition, and Capitol Hill. Dr. Miyamoto’s areas of research, publications, and presentations focus on health policy, coalition building, and political advocacy. Dr. Miyamoto received her Bachelor of Science in

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Nursing, Bachelor of Arts in Psychology, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctorate of Philosophy in Nursing from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She is a member of Sigma Theta Tau International, Women in Government Relations, Academy Health, the American Organization of Nurse Leaders, and the American Nurses Association. Dr. Miyamoto is a Fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, an Honorary Friend of the National Institute of Nursing Research, and a 2014 Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Executive Nurse Fellow.

Loretta M. Nunez, M.A., Au.D., CCC-A/SLP, is Director of Academic Affairs & Research Education for the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association where she directs activities that support academic, clinical, and research education; personnel preparation and faculty development; and higher education trends and forecasting in communication sciences and disorders. Dr. Nunez leads ASHA’s Envisioned Future 2025 strategic objective to advance interprofessional education and interprofessional collaborative practice and represents ASHA on the Interprofessional Professionalism Collaborative (IPC) to develop an assessment tool and educational tool kit for IPE/IPP. She also leads or has led initiatives related to clinical personnel supply and demand, clinical specialty certification, emerging areas of clinical practice, expanding academic program capacity for graduate education in speech-language pathology and audiology, addressing a Ph.D. shortage and directing a national higher education data collection and reporting system for the discipline. Dr. Nunez has served on many committees and as ASHA’s liaison to the Education Testing Service (2003–2014) for the development of national examinations in speech-language pathology and audiology. She has given numerous presentations at international and national conferences over the course of her career. She is an ASHA Fellow and a Distinguished Practitioner and Fellow of the National Academy of Practice in Speech-Language Pathology. Prior to joining ASHA in 2003, Dr. Nunez worked in both academic and clinical settings and held faculty appointments at Johns Hopkins University, the University of Akron, and Kent State University. She holds dual ASHA certification and state licensure as a speech-language pathologist and audiologist and holds specialty certification in Listening and Spoken Language from the AG Bell Association. She earned a Doctor of Audiology degree from Central Michigan University and a Master of Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees in speech-language pathology and audiology from The Ohio State University.

Toyese Oyeyemi, Jr., M.P.H., MCHES, M.B.A., is Executive Director of the Beyond Flexner Alliance based at The George Washington University in Washington, DC. His research, teaching, and practice have focused on equitable health workforce development, social and structural determinants

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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of health, and community-driven interventions in population health. Mr. Oyeyemi is a public health practitioner, Master Certified Health Education Specialist (MCHES), and maintains a faculty lecture title in population health and faculty research title in family and community medicine at the University of New Mexico. He studied community health (B.A.) at New Mexico State University, public health (M.P.H.) at the University of New Mexico, and business management (M.B.A.) at the University of Arizona.

Miguel A. Paniagua, M.D., FACP, FAAHPM (Planning Committee Co-Chair) currently serves as Medical Advisor for Test Development Services at the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME). His work at NBME includes research on wellness and burnout, how race, ethnicity, and patient characteristics impact exams. Dr. Paniagua is working toward development of assessments of competencies such as communication skills and interprofessional team work, as well as other innovations across various NBME examinations. Dr. Paniagua is a forum member representative to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Global Forum on Innovations in Health Professions Education, The ACGME’s National Collaborative to Improve the Clinical Learning Environment (NCICLE) and a member of the Alpha Omega Alpha medical honor society. He is a fellow of the American College of Physicians, The American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine, and the College of Physicians of Philadelphia. Dr. Paniagua received his undergraduate degree from Saint Louis University before earning his M.D. at the University of Illinois College of Medicine, Chicago, where he also is completing his Masters of Health Professions Education (MHPE). Dr. Paniagua completed his internal medicine residency and gerontology and geriatric medicine fellowship at the University of Washington, Seattle. One day per week, he practices consultative Hospice and Palliative Medicine at the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania and is an adjunct professor in the faculty of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. He is the co-editor of the fifth edition of the Essential Practices of Palliative Medicine (UNIPAC) book series and the fourth edition of the NBME publication, Constructing Written Test Questions for the Basic and Clinical Sciences.

Senthil Kumar Rajasekaran, M.D., MMHPE, is senior associate dean for Curricular Affairs and Undergraduate Medical Education for the Wayne State University School of Medicine. Dr. Rajasekaran provides leadership and has the primary responsibility for the design, continuing development and implementation of the curriculum leading to the medical degree. A professor of pharmacology, he served as associate dean for academic affairs at Eastern Virginia Medical School in Norfolk, VA. There he led a

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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major curriculum reform that demonstrated improved learning outcomes and won national recognition for its innovative design and focus on social determinants of health and chronic disease prevention and management. Dr. Rajasekaran was a founding co-director of the Center for Excellence in Medical Education at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine in Rochester, MI, where he was instrumental in establishing the fellowship in Medical Education and Residents as Teachers programs. He had also served as dean of Basic Sciences, professor and chair of Pharmacology and Clinical Therapeutics at St. Matthew’s University, Grand Cayman, where he successfully led a major curricular revision and restructuring. Dr. Rajasekaran has secured multiple institutional and national awards of excellence, including the 2017 Teaching Value Award from the American Board of Internal Medicine Foundation and Costs of Care, and multiple Golden Apple Awards for teaching excellence. He received honorary fellowships in the American College of Clinical Pharmacology and the Academy of Medical Educators in the United Kingdom. Dr. Rajasekaran is actively engaged in the regional, national, and international medical education landscape. On a regional level, he was selected to serve on the steering committee of the Association of American Medical Colleges Southern Group on Educational Affairs and oversees the organization’s Special Interest Groups. On a national level, he was elected by the member schools to serve as a member of the Executive Committee of American Medical Association Accelerating Change in Education Consortium. Internationally, he is a member of the Executive Council of World Federation for Medical Education and represents the organization in the World Health Organization medical education-related meetings. Dr. Rajasekaran has written and co-written multiple publications, and has been invited to present and chair sessions at national and international meetings. He also serves as a deputy editor of the Teaching and Learning in Medicine journal.

Edward Salsberg, M.P.A., has been a national leader in health workforce research, policies, and data for over 25 years. He is currently on the faculty in the Department of Health Policy at The George Washington University School of Public Health and Health Services. Mr. Salsberg has successfully established and managed three health workforce research centers. He is a frequent speaker across the country and has authored and co-authored numerous reports and papers on the health workforce. Until recently, Mr. Salsberg was the founding director of the National Center for Health Workforce Analysis in the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services which was authorized by the Affordable Care Act. Mr. Salsberg previously established and directed the Center for Workforce Studies at the Association on American Medical Colleges (AAMC) and the Center for Health Workforce Studies at the School of Public Health at the University at Albany

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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of the State University of New York (SUNY). All three health workforce centers have been leaders in providing information on the supply, demand, distribution, and use of the health care workforce and they have pioneered approaches to collecting health workforce data. From 1984 until 1996, Mr. Salsberg was a Bureau Director at the New York State Department of Health. Mr. Salsberg received his M.P.A. from the Wagner School at New York University.

Sabrina Salvant, Ed.D., M.P.H., OTR/L, has been actively involved in the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) for over 25 years; first as a volunteer and then as part of the senior leadership team engaging in strategic planning and visioning. Her tenure as an employee with the association started as the director of accreditation where she was responsible for the oversight, strategic direction, and representation of the accreditation department. In conjunction with the accreditation staff, Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE©), and volunteer accreditation evaluators, she addressed complex issues related to higher education and accreditation; and liaises between AOTA, ACOTE, U.S. Department of Education (USDE), Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA©), and all internal and external stakeholders. Currently, Sabrina serves as the Vice President of Education and Professional Development where she provides oversight for entry level education through professional development post-graduation. She engages in strategic visioning and planning for accreditation, continuing education, advance certification, and the fellowship and approved provider programs as it relates to the associations overarching vision for the occupational therapy profession.

Casey R. Shillam, Ph.D., R.N., is Dean and Professor of the University of Portland (UP) School of Nursing. She holds clinical practice, policy and administrative experience in palliative care, innovation, curriculum development, and executive leadership. Dr. Shillam’s UP career first began in 2006 as an instructor and then assistant professor. After a hiatus during which she completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of California, Davis (UC Davis), taught at Johns Hopkins University School of Nursing, and founded a nursing program at Western Washington University, she returned to UP in 2015 to serve as associate dean and in 2018 was appointed dean of the School of Nursing. Her proficiency in academic administration builds from a variety of programs beyond academic teaching and clinical practice. Her experience includes launching an entirely new nursing program at a university, founding a Palliative Care Institute by partnering with multiple hospitals and community-based organizations to provide community-based palliative care and to deliver interprofessional provider training, and developing health policy in palliative and end-of-life care at the local and state

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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levels. Dr. Shillam has guided the complete revision of the B.S.N. program of study at UP. Moving from traditional specialty-focused to a concept-based curriculum, she has led the nursing faculty in exploring every aspect of current best-practices in the neuroscience impact on learning, concept-based teaching, simulation, and innovation. Under her leadership, the School of Nursing has created new curriculum approaches to preparing students to serve in primary, ambulatory, and community-based care settings to meet the demands of addressing population health. Other innovations under her leadership of the University of Portland include establishing a Nurse-Managed Clinic serving those who are houseless, developing a new major in Integrative Health and Wellness studies, and establishing new models of clinical education through an Interprofessional Dedicated Education Unit and an Ambulatory Care Dedicated Education Unit. Dr. Shillam has a bachelor of arts and letters from Portland State University, a bachelor of science, master of science, and Ph.D. in nursing all from Oregon Health & Science University, and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at UC Davis. She served as an Expert Nurse Consultant to Future of Nursing: Campaign for Action and has developed a variety of programs supporting nurses in leadership development. Recognized for her strong leadership history, Dr. Shillam was selected for the final cohort of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation’s Executive Nurse Fellows program and completed the fellowship in September 2017. Dr. Shillam served two terms on the American Association of Colleges of Nursing’s (AACN’s) Health Policy Advisory Council, provided leadership in multiple professional nursing organizations and health foundation boards, currently serves on the AACN Essentials Task Force revising academic standards for nursing education, and is a co-chair of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Family Caregiving Advisory Council.

Zohray M. Talib, M.D., is Senior Associate Dean of Academic Affairs, Chair of the Department of Medical Education and Professor of Medical Education and Medicine at the California University of Science and Medicine. Her experience spans the field of medical education and global health, with a particular focus on social accountability in health professions education. She has worked with undergraduate and graduate medical education programs in the United States and across sub-Saharan Africa to bring best practices into medical education, especially in low-resource settings. Her particular areas of interest include community-based education, decentralized training, and building a robust and diverse faculty workforce for underserved communities. Dr. Talib led a study across ten countries in Africa which shed light on the value of bringing learners into community-based health care settings. She has also partnered with faculty in Africa to examine the burden of mental health and strategies to integrate mental health into primary care. Dr. Talib holds visiting faculty appointments at the Aga Khan University

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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in East Africa as well as Mbarara University of Science and Technology in Uganda. Dr. Talib brings to the field of academic medicine and global health the unique perspective of being a primary care clinician, educator, and researcher. She is a licensed and practicing internal medicine primary care physician. She teaches clinical medicine, health policy, and health systems to undergraduate medical students. Dr. Talib holds an adjunct faculty appointment at The George Washington University where she was previously Associate Program Director for the Internal Medicine program and a researcher with the Health Workforce Institute. Dr. Talib has a deep commitment to caring for underserved communities with experience running grassroots programs providing continuing education for health professionals in the community. Dr. Talib has led global health initiatives in Central Asia and East Africa which include community-based cancer screening, management training, and clinical research training for academic faculty. She currently chairs a national board that provides social safety net services including a crisis line, poverty case management, and community-based care for the elderly. Dr. Talib received her Bachelor of Science in Physical Therapy from McGill University, Montreal, Canada, and her Doctor of Medicine from University of Alberta, Edmonton, Canada. She completed her residency in Internal Medicine at The George Washington University Hospital. She is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine, and a Fellow of the American College of Physicians.

Charles (Tom) Thomas, M.A., is Vice President for Strategic Planning at the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. For the 15 years prior, Mr. Thomas was a founding Principal of the Futures Strategy Group where he led projects in public and private sector strategic planning. Typical projects were performed for clients who faced significant uncertainties and ambiguities in their future operating environments. From 1998 to 2002, he was a Firm Director (non-equity partner) in the strategy practice of Deloitte Consulting. Prior to the merger with Deloitte, Mr. Thomas was a Vice President of The Futures Group, Inc. (TFG). He ran the Corporate Strategy Practice and, earlier, formed and ran the Scenario Planning Group. He had been with TFG in various positions for over 15 years. Before joining TFG, Mr. Thomas served as an In-Service Fellow at the United Nations (UNITAR) consulted to several Wall Street banks and securities firms, and taught courses in international relations, arms control, political economy, and Soviet domestic and foreign policy at Fordham, Rutgers, and Columbia universities. At Columbia, he served as Director of the Soviet/East European and International Security Program.

Mr. Thomas is an internationally published author on the use of scenarios in strategic planning. His consulting was with clients in both the private and public sectors including financial services, pharmaceuticals,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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health care, communications, information systems, aerospace and defense, the automotive industry, maritime transportation, public utilities, and U.S. government departments and agencies such as NASA, the United States Coast Guard, the Intelligence Community, the U.S. Department of State, and FEMA. Mr. Thomas holds an M.A. in international relations, an M.A. in Russian studies, and an M.Phil. in international relations.

Melissa E. Trego, O.D., Ph.D., graduated from Susquehanna University with a Bachelor of Science degree in Biochemistry. After earning her Doctorate of Optometry degree from the Pennsylvania College of Optometry in 2004, Dr. Trego enrolled in a Ph.D. program in the Visual Neuroscience and Molecular Biology Division at Cardiff University in Wales, United Kingdom. Dr. Trego wrote her Ph.D. dissertation on the role of alpha crystallins as possible protectors in both the mouse and human retinae. She received her Ph.D. from Cardiff University in 2009. In 2006, Dr. Trego began her residency in Primary Care at The Eye Institute. Since then, she has mentored students pursuing a Master’s Degree in Clinical Optometry in the Center for International Studies and has served as an International Optometric Clinical Instructor. Dr. Trego is a member of the American Academy of Optometry, American Optometric Association, Association of Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, Association of Women in Science, Cardiff Institute of Tissue Engineering and Repair and is an examiner for the National Boards of Optometry.

Sylvia Trent-Adams, Ph.D., R.N., FAAN, FNAP, is the Executive Vice President and Chief Strategy Officer at the University of North Texas Health Science Center (HSC) at Fort Worth. In this role, she assists the President in developing, communicating, executing, and sustaining strategic initiatives. As HSC’s Chief Strategy Officer, Dr. Trent-Adams leads the strategic planning process, focusing on accelerating organization performance through cohesive strategy planning and execution, knowledge management, and organizational accountability.

A lifetime public servant, Dr. Trent-Adams began her extensive public health career in 1992 by joining the Commissioned Corps before ultimately retiring in 2020 from the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps with the rank of Rear Admiral Upper Half.

Prior to joining HSC, Dr. Trent-Adams served as the Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health (PDASH) from January 2019 through August 2020. As the PDASH, she shared responsibility with the Assistant Secretary for Health planning, coordinating, and directing substantive program matters; policy and program development; and determining and setting legislative and program priorities covering the full range of public health activities within the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Health.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Throughout her career, Dr. Trent-Adams has focused on improving access to care for poor and underserved communities. As both a clinician and administrator, she has made a direct impact on building systems of care to improve public health for marginalized populations domestically and internationally. Dr. Trent-Adams continued this work during her time as the Deputy Surgeon General of the U.S. Public Health Service Commissioned Corps from 2015 to 2018. As Deputy Surgeon General, Dr. Trent-Adams was a trusted advisor to the Surgeon General, providing support on a variety of critical issues, including efforts to combat the opioid crisis and the operations of the Commissioned Corps.

Prior to serving as Deputy Surgeon General, Dr. Sylvia Trent-Adams was Deputy Associate Administrator for the HIV/AIDS Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration. Through this role, she helped manage the $2.3 billion Ryan White program, which funds medical care, treatment, referrals, and support services for uninsured and underserved people living with HIV disease as well as training for health care professionals.

Dr. Trent-Adams’ dedicated service and leadership has been widely recognized, earning numerous accolades and awards. In 2017, Dr. Trent-Adams was awarded the International Red Cross Florence Nightingale Medal, the highest international honor bestowed upon a nurse. Additionally, Dr. Trent-Adams is the recipient of the American Nursing Credentialing Center’s HRH Princess Muna Al Hussein Award, the American Academy of Nursing’s Civitas Award, the American Association of the Colleges of Nursing’s Lois Capps Luminary Policy Award.

Dr. Trent-Adams has been elected as a fellow in several organizations, including the American Academy of Nursing (2014), National Academy of Medicine (2018), and the National Academies of Practice (2018). These many accomplishments speak to her dedicated service, including a Distinguished Service Medal for her sustained leadership, dedication, and service at the highest levels while serving as Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Health and Deputy Surgeon General. Dr. Trent-Adams was also awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for her leadership during the Commissioned Corps response to the Ebola Outbreak in West Africa and the Surgeon General’s Medallion for service acting Surgeon General from April 2017 to September 2017.

Dr. Trent-Adams received her B.S.N. from Hampton University, a Master of Science in Nursing and Health Policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore, and a Doctor of Philosophy in Public Policy from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. Dr. Trent-Adams was a nurse officer in the U.S. Army and a research nurse at the University of Maryland. She also completed two internships in the U.S. Senate, where she focused on the prospective payment system for skilled nursing facilities and scope of

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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practice for nurses and psychologists. Her clinical practice was in trauma, oncology, community health, and infectious disease.

Carole A Tucker, P.T., Ph.D., received her bachelor’s degree from Boston University in Physical Therapy, her master’s degree in Electrical Engineering from Boston University, and a Ph.D. in Exercise Science from SUNY-Buffalo. She currently is Professor and Associate Dean of Research, School of Health Professions, University of Texas | Medical Branch. She retained her Pediatric Clinical Specialist from 1996–2016 and has been credentialed as a Registered Clinical Exercise Physiologist with the American College of Sports Medicine. She receives funding from the National Institutes of Health, the U.S. Department of Defense, Shriners Hospitals for Children, and PCORI for research programs that span pediatric neuromotor science, health outcomes, measurement science, and learning health systems. Her research interests include medical and health informatics, data science, mobile health and wearable sensors, patient reported health outcomes, application of advanced statistical and analytical approaches to large data-sets, and interventions to improve function and mobility in children with physical disabilities. While collaborative research and mentoring are critical components of her work, she has maintained active clinical practice, most recently in the neonatal and neuromotor practice areas, which she finds immensely rewarding.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Speaker Biographical Sketches." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Lessons Learned in Health Professions Education During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Part 2: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26484.
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Next: Appendix D: Timeline of the Workshop Series Activities »
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The COVID-19 pandemic was arguably the greatest disrupter health professional education (HPE) has ever experienced. To explore how lessons learned from this unprecedented event could inform the future of HPE, the Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine convened a virtual workshop series in 2020 and 2021. The first workshop focused on identifying challenges faced by educators, administrators, and students amidst the pandemic and how the different stakeholder groups shifted and adapted in response. The second workshop explored how experts from various health professions might respond to hypothetical—but realistic—future world situations impacting HPE. The final two workshops contemplated the future of HPE post-COVID and explored next steps for applying lessons learned from the workshop series to allow educators to test and evaluate educational innovations in real time. This Proceedings of a Workshop summarizes discussions from the second, third, and fourth workshops in this series.

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