National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: References
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Automated Research Workflows For Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26532.
×
Page169
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Automated Research Workflows For Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26532.
×
Page170
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Automated Research Workflows For Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26532.
×
Page171
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Workshop Agenda." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Automated Research Workflows For Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26532.
×
Page172

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

Appendix A Workshop Agenda Opportunities for Accelerating Scientific Discovery: Realizing the Potential of Advanced and Automated Workflows AGENDA March 16–17, 2020 March 16, 2020 (Monday) 8:30 am EDT/1:30 pm CET/5:30 am PDT PART ONE: USE CASES Welcome, Overview, and Goals of the Symposium—Daniel Atkins, University of Michigan 8:45 am EDT/1:45 pm CET/5:45 am PDT Sponsor Perspective—Stuart Feldman, Schmidt Futures 9:00 am EDT/2:00 pm CET/6:00 am PDT Accelerating Discovery: Case Studies, Requirements, and Progress, Part One Session Leaders: Ilkay Altintas, San Diego Supercomputer Center, and Tapio Schneider, California Institute of Technology Panelists: Timothy Cernak, University of Michigan Kyle Cranmer, New York University Alex Szalay, Johns Hopkins University 10:00 am EDT/3:00 pm CET/7:00 am PDT BREAK 10:15 am/3:15 pm CET/7:15 am PDT Accelerating Discovery: Case Studies, Requirements, and Progress, Part Two Panelists: Gregory Crane, Tufts University Tyrel McQueen, Johns Hopkins University Robert Murphy, Carnegie Mellon University 11:15 am/4:15 pm CET/8:15 am PDT PART TWO: ENABLING TECHNOLOGIES 169 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Accelerating Discovery: Mathematical and Algorithmic Issues Session Leaders: Bradley Malin, Vanderbilt University, Alfred Hero, University of Michigan, Tapio Schneider, California Institute of Technology Panelists: Rene Vidal, Johns Hopkins University Rebecca Nugent, Carnegie Mellon University Victoria Stodden, University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign 12:15 pm/5:15 pm CET/9:15 am PDT BREAK 12:30 pm/5:30 pm CET/9:30 am PDT Perspective from the Office of Science and Technology Policy Kelvin Droegemeier, Director, Office of Science and Technology Policy 12:40 pm/5:40 pm CET/9:40 am PDT Accelerating Discovery: Status and Trajectory of Supporting Tools and Systems Session Leaders: Mercè Crosas, Harvard University, and Shreyas Cholia, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Panelists: Carole Goble, University of Manchester Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory Brian Granger, Project Jupyter and Amazon Web Services Julia Lane, New York University Peter Beckman, Argonne National Laboratory Geoffrey Fox, Indiana University 2:40 pm EDT/7:30 pm CET/11:30 am PDT OPEN DISCUSSION (Break as needed) 3:30 pm EDT/8:30 pm CET/12:30 pm PDT ADJOURN DAY ONE March 17, 2020 (Tuesday) 8:30 am EDT/1:30 pm CET/5:30 am PDT PART THREE: HUMAN AND POLICY ISSUES Welcome and Overview of Day Two—Daniel Atkins 8:45 am EDT/1:45 pm CET/5:45 am PDT 170 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Accelerating Discovery: Standards, Governance, and Social Context Session Leaders: Lara Mangravite, Sage Bionetworks, and Rebecca Lawrence, F1000 Research Panelists: Raja Mazumder, George Washington University Beth Plale, National Science Foundation Timothy Gardner, Riffyn, Inc. Michael Crusoe, Common Workflow Language 9:45 am EDT/2:45 pm CET/6:45 am PDT BREAK 10:00 am EDT/3:00 pm CET/7:00 am PDT Accelerating Discovery: Developing Supportive Policies, Communities, and Sustainable Funding Session Leader: Alfred Hero, University of Michigan Panelists: Jean-Claude Burgelman, European Commission Dmitri Kusnezov, U.S. Department of Energy Adam Russell, Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency Daniel Weitzner, Massachusetts Institute of Technology 11:15 am EDT/4:15 pm CET/8:15 am PDT PART FOUR: SYNTHESIS AND FUTURE PRIORITIES Synthesis of What We Have Heard Session Leaders: Rebecca Lawrence, F1000 Research, and Tapio Schneider, California Institute of Technology Panelists: Carole Goble, University of Manchester Ian Foster, Argonne National Laboratory Alex Szalay, Johns Hopkins University Timothy Gardner, Ryffin, Inc. 1:00 pm EDT/6:00 pm CET/10:00 am PDT ADJOURN PUBLIC WORKSHOP 171 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Next: Appendix B: Committee Biosketches »
Automated Research Workflows For Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop Get This Book
×
Buy Paperback | $45.00
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

The needs and demands placed on science to address a range of urgent problems are growing. The world is faced with complex, interrelated challenges in which the way forward lies hidden or dispersed across disciplines and organizations. For centuries, scientific research has progressed through iteration of a workflow built on experimentation or observation and analysis of the resulting data. While computers and automation technologies have played a central role in research workflows for decades to acquire, process, and analyze data, these same computing and automation technologies can now also control the acquisition of data, for example, through the design of new experiments or decision making about new observations.

The term automated research workflow (ARW) describes scientific research processes that are emerging across a variety of disciplines and fields. ARWs integrate computation, laboratory automation, and tools from artificial intelligence in the performance of tasks that make up the research process, such as designing experiments, observations, and simulations; collecting and analyzing data; and learning from the results to inform further experiments, observations, and simulations. The common goal of researchers implementing ARWs is to accelerate scientific knowledge generation, potentially by orders of magnitude, while achieving greater control and reproducibility in the scientific process.

Automated Research Workflows for Accelerated Discovery: Closing the Knowledge Discovery Loop examines current efforts to develop advanced and automated workflows to accelerate research progress, including wider use of artificial intelligence. This report identifies research needs and priorities in the use of advanced and automated workflows for scientific research. Automated Research Workflows for Accelerated Discovery is intended to create awareness, momentum, and synergies to realize the potential of ARWs in scholarly discovery.

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!