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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Page xiii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Page xvii Cite
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26547.
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Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP Ruth Cooper, Carol Berkower, and Sharyl Nass, Rapporteurs National Cancer Policy Forum and the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence Board on Health Care Services Health and Medicine Division Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions Division on Earth and Life Sciences PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

THE NATIONAL ACADEMIES PRESS  500 Fifth Street, NW  Washington, DC 20001 This activity was supported by Contract No. 68HERC19D0011 (Task Order No. 68HERC19D0011), Contract No. HHSN263201800029I (Task Order No. 75N98020F0018), Contract No. HHSN263201800029I (Task Order No. HHSN26300008), and Contract No. HHSN2632018000029I (Task Order 75N98019F00848) from the Environmental Protection Agency; the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institute on Aging/National Institutes of Health, respectively; and by the American Kennel Club Canine Health Foundation; Animal Cancer Foundation; College of Veterinary Medicine & Biomedical Science at Texas A&M University; Flint Animal Cancer Center, Colorado State University; Nicholas School of the Environment; North Carolina State University College of Veterinary Medicine; The Morris Animal Founda- tion; and University of Colorado Cancer Center. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project. International Standard Book Number-13: 978-0-309-XXXXX-X International Standard Book Number-10: 0-309-XXXXX-X Digital Object Identifier: https://doi.org/10.17226/26547 Additional copies of this publication are available from the National Academies Press, 500 Fifth Street, NW, Keck 360, Washington, DC 20001; (800) 624-6242 or (202) 334-3313; http://www.nap.edu. Copyright 2022 by the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. Printed in the United States of America Suggested citation: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Companion animals as sentinels for predicting environmental exposure effects on aging and cancer susceptibility in humans: Proceedings of a workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. https://doi.org/10.17226/26547. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

The National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, nongovernmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technol- ogy. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. The National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson is president. The National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. The three Academies work together as the National Academies of ­Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. The National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Consensus Study Reports published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine document the evidence-based consensus on the study’s statement of task by an authoring committee of experts. Reports typically include findings, conclusions, and recommendations based on information gathered by the committee and the committee’s deliberations. Each report has been subjected to a rigorous and independent peer-review process and it represents the position of the National Academies on the statement of task. Proceedings published by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine chronicle the presentations and discussions at a workshop, symposium, or other event convened by the National Academies. The state- ments and opinions contained in proceedings are those of the participants and are not endorsed by other participants, the planning committee, or the National Academies. For information about other products and activities of the National ­Academies, please visit www.nationalacademies.org/about/whatwedo. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

PLANNING COMMITTEE ON THE ROLE OF COMPANION ANIMALS AS SENTINELS FOR PREDICTING ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE EFFECTS ON AGING AND CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY IN HUMANS1 LINDA S. BIRNBAUM (Chair), Scientist Emeritus, National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences/National Toxicology Program; Scholar in Residence, Nicholas School of the Environment, Duke University MATTHEW BREEN, Professor of Genomics, Oscar J. Fletcher Distinguished Professor of Comparative Oncology Genetics, Department of Molecular Biomedical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, North Carolina State University MYRTLE DAVIS, Executive Director, Discovery Toxicology, Bristol Myers Squibb NICOLE DEZIEL, Associate Professor, Yale School of Public Health, Yale Center for Perinatal, Pediatric, and Environmental Epidemiology WILLIAM FARLAND, Professor Emeritus, Environmental and Radiological Health Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, Colorado State University ROY JENSEN, Director, The University of Kansas Cancer Center, Kansas Masonic Cancer Research Institute; William R. Jewell, MD Distinguished Masonic Professor, The University of Kansas Cancer Center, The University of Kansas Medical Center DANIEL PROMISLOW, Principal Investigator and Co-Director, Dog Aging Project; Professor, Department of Lab Medicine & Pathology and Department of Biology, University of Washington School of Medicine WENDY SHELTON, Principal, Virtual Beast Consulting; Consultant, Colorado State University CHERYL LYN WALKER, Alkek Presidential Chair in Environmental Health; Director, Center for Precision Environmental Health; Professor, Departments of Molecular & Cell Biology and Medicine, Baylor College of Medicine Project Staff RUTH COOPER, Associate Program Officer TOCHI OGBU-MBADIUGHA, Senior Program Assistant 1 The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s planning committees are solely responsible for organizing the workshop, identifying topics, and choosing speak- ers. The responsibility for the published Proceedings of a Workshop rests with the workshop rapporteur and the institution. v PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

MARILEE SHELTON DAVENPORT, Senior Program Officer, Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions (until March 2022) TRACY A. LUSTIG, Senior Program Officer; Director, Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence SHARYL NASS, Senior Director, Board on Health Care Services; Co-Director, National Cancer Policy Forum vi PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Reviewers This Proceedings of a Workshop was reviewed in draft form by individuals chosen for their diverse perspectives and technical expertise. The purpose of this independent review is to provide candid and critical comments that will assist the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine in mak- ing each published proceedings as sound as possible and to ensure that it meets the institutional standards for quality, objectivity, evidence, and responsiveness to the charge. The review comments and draft manuscript remain confidential to protect the integrity of the process. We thank the following individuals for their review of this proceedings: BERNADETTE DUNHAM, George Washington University BEVERLY H. KOLLER, University of North Carolina Chapel Hill LAUREN TREPANIER, University of Wisconsin-Madison Although the reviewers listed above provided many constructive com- ments and suggestions, they were not asked to endorse the content of the proceedings nor did they see the final draft before its release. The review of this proceedings was overseen by ELI Y. ADASHI, Brown University. He was responsible for making certain that an independent examination of this proceedings was carried out in accordance with standards of the National Academies and that all review comments were carefully considered. Responsi- bility for the final content rests entirely with the rapporteurs and the National Academies. We also thank staff member Alexandra Beatty for reading and providing helpful comments on this manuscript. vii PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Acknowledgments The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine’s Board on Health Care Services wishes to express its sincere gratitude to the planning committee chair, Linda S. Birnbaum, for her valuable contributions to the development and orchestration of this workshop. The board also wishes to thank all the members of the planning committee, who collaborated to ensure a workshop replete with informative presentations and moderated rich discus- sions. We are also grateful for the support of our workshop sponsors, without which we could not have undertaken this project, particularly Danielle Carlin, NIEHS, and Rodney Page, Flint Animal Cancer Center, Colorado State Uni- versity. Finally, the board wants to thank the speakers, who generously shared their expertise and their time with workshop participants. Research assistance was provided by Christopher Lao-Scott, National Academies. ix PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Contents ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS xvii PROCEEDINGS OF A WORKSHOP 1 INTRODUCTION 1 BACKGROUND ON CANCER, AGING, AND ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE RESEARCH 6 HISTORY AND CURRENT STATE OF THE SCIENCE OF ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE EFFECTS ON AGING AND CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY 10 Environmental Exposure and Cancer, 10 Environmental Exposure, Cancer, and Aging in Companion Animals: The Companion Dog Model, 15 Why Pet Dogs with Spontaneous Tumors are Good Models for Human Disease, 18 How Diet Modulates the Tumor Microenvironment (TME), 23 Epigenetic Aging as a Target and Biomarker for Environmental Exposures, 25 Domestic Dogs as a System for Understanding Aging and Life Span, 27 Aging, Somatic Evolution, and Cancer—The Inexorable Link, 29 Discussion: Animal Size, Reproductive Status, and Cancer, 31 METHODS AND CURRENT STUDIES 33 The Exposome and Health, 33 xi PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

xii CONTENTS Biomonitoring of Chemical Exposure in Companion Animals and Humans, 37 Ongoing Canine Population Studies, 40 Discussion: Advancing Use of Companion Dogs as Sentinels, 51 RELEVANCE OF COMPANION ANIMAL EXPOSURES TO HUMAN CANCER AND AGING 54 Exposures to Air Pollution, Smoking, and Lead, 54 Using Silicone Samplers to Assess Air Pollution in People and Pets, 56 Cats as Sentinels for Persistent Organic Pollutants Indoors, 58 Radon Exposures and Cancer in Pets, 61 Heavy Metal Exposures in the Dogs of Chernobyl, 62 Exposures through Food, 64 Chemical Mixtures, Cancer, and Diet—The Example of Pesticides, 65 Discussion: Relevance of Companion Animal Exposures to Humans, 68 ACCELERATING CROSS-SPECIES COMPARISONS: OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES IN DATA SOURCES, COLLECTION, STORAGE, MODELING, AND SHARING 71 Human Exposure Assessment, 71 Comparative Oncology: How Dogs are Helping Researchers Understand and Treat Cancer, 73 Biobanks for Companion Animal Sentinel Studies, 76 Using Ontologies to Unify Genomics and Phenomics across Species, 79 Data, Samples, and Modeling, 81 Discussion: Accelerating Cross-Species Comparisons, 85 EQUITY, ETHICS, AND POLICY 90 Ethical Considerations of Using Companion Animals as Sentinels: Research Subject Protections, Citizen Science Issues, and Shared Health, 90 One Health Approaches in Arctic Indigenous Communities, 93 Aligning Health Care for a Bonded Family Society, 95 Discussion: Equity, Ethics, and Policy, 96 IDENTIFYING RESEARCH GAPS AND SETTING A RESEARCH AGENDA: EXPLORING NEXT STEPS FOR THE PATH FORWARD 99 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

CONTENTS xiii Obtaining Data on Pets and Exposures, 99 Interdisciplinary Training of Researchers, Physicians, and Veterinarians for One Health, 100 Translating the Science between Pets and People, 101 Data Integration, 102 Data Collection: Long-Term Investment, 103 Data Collection: Tapping into Existing Cohorts (Short Term), 103 Continuing and Expanding the Conversation, 104 Community Research—Engagement and Equity, 104 CONCLUDING REMARKS AND POTENTIAL NEXT STEPS 105 References, 107 APPENDIXES A STATEMENT OF TASK 125 B WORKSHOP AGENDA 127 C BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES OF PLANNING COMMITTEE MEMBERS AND WORKSHOP SPEAKERS 133 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Boxes, Figures, and Table BOXES 1 Suggestions from Individual Workshop Participants to Advance the Use of Companion Animals as Sentinels for Predicting Environmental Exposure Effects on Aging and Cancer Susceptibility in Humans, 3 2 Examples of NIEHS-Sponsored Sensor Research, 41 3 The Golden Retriever Lifetime Study, 44 4 The Dog Aging Project, 46 5 Studies of Dogs as Sentinels for Testicular Dysgenesis Syndrome, 49 FIGURES 1 Increasing incidence of common cancers and specifically colorectal cancers (CRC): Environmental etiology?, 11 2 The complexities of documenting exposures, 13 3 Dogs can serve as a useful model in comparative oncology, 17 4 The remarkable similarity in cancers that develop in humans and dogs, 18 5 The nonlinear relationship between dog age and human age, 28 6 Cancers requiring different numbers of driver mutations and originating from stem cell pools that are organized in vastly different ways demonstrate very similar age-dependent incidence, 30 7 The exposome: Implications for examining environmental health disparities, 34 xv PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

xvi BOXES, FIGURES, AND TABLE 8 The exposome concept, 35 9 Approaches to exposure science at the NIEHS, 40 10 Contingency Test for Trend based on (A) associations of body weight and (B) body condition scores with quartile rankings based on serum total PFAS concentrations, 60 11 The Hallmark Framework of cancer progression, 66 12 Comparative molecular features of canine and human osteosarcomas, 75 13 Development of species-agnostic ontologies to classify phenotypes across species, 80 14 Integration of exposure event modeling with the Monarch Knowledge Graph, 82 TABLE 1 A Selection of Canine Cancer Sentinel Studies Showing Positive Association or No Association with Environmental Exposure, 21 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

Acronyms and Abbreviations AAVSB American Association of Veterinary State Boards ACVO American College of Veterinary Ophthalmologists AD Alzheimer’s disease AI artificial intelligence AIDS acquired immunodeficiency syndrome AKC American Kennel Club AML acute myeloid leukemia ATSDR Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry AVCC Access to Veterinary Care Coalition AVMA American Veterinary Medical Association BMI body mass index CA conformity assessment C-BARQ Canine Behavioral Assessment & Research Questionnaire CBPR community-based participatory research CDC Centers for Disease Control and Prevention CE continuing education CHIC Canine Health Information Center CKD chronic kidney disease CLL chronic lymphocytic leukemia CML chronic myeloid leukemia CO carbon monoxide COHA Clinical and Translational Science Award One Health Alliance xvii PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

xviii ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS COTC (NCI) Comparative Oncology Trials Consortium CRC colorectal cancer CRDC Cancer Research Data Commons CREID Centers for Research in Emerging Infectious Diseases CSTA clinical and translational science awards CTL cytotoxic T lymphocyte DAP Dog Aging Project DDT dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane DEHP di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate DEMS Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study DOHAD Developmental Origins of Health and Disease EMR electronic medical record EMT epithelial mesenchymal transition EPA Environmental Protection Agency ER+ estrogen-receptor-positive EWAS exposome-wide association study FDA Food and Drug Administration FH feline hyperthyroidism fMRI functional magnetic resonance imaging GC gas chromatography GIS geographic information systems GO Gene Ontology GRLS Golden Retriever Lifetime Study GXE gene by environment HHEAR Human Health Exposure Analysis Resource HRMS high-resolution mass spectrometry IACUC Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee IARC World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer ICDC Integrated Canine Data Commons ICP-MS inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy IGF insulin-like growth factor ISBER International Society for Biological and Environmental Repositories MESA Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS xix MET mesenchymal to epithelial transition MHC major histocompatibility complex ML machine learning MOU memorandum of understanding MS mass spectrometry MWAS metabolome-wide association study NASEM National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine NCI National Cancer Institute NGO nongovernmental organization NHANES National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey NIA National Institute on Aging NIEHS National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences NIH National Institutes of Health NIST National Institutes of Standards and Technology NSRL no-significant-risk level NTP National Toxicology Program OFA Orthopedic Foundation for Animals PATO Phenotype and Trait Ontology PBDE polybrominated diphenyl ether PBMC peripheral blood mononuclear cell PBPK physiologically based pharmacokinetics PCB polychlorinated biphenyl PDMS polydimethylsiloxane PEGS Personalized Environment and Genes Study (NIEHS) PFAS poly- and perfluoroalkyl substances PTHxS perfluorohexane sulfonate PFOA perfluorooctanoic acid PFOS perfluorooctane sulfonic acid PHD3 prolyl-hydroxylase 3 PI principal investigator PK pharmacokinetics POC point of care device POP persistent organic pollutant PPN primary pulmonary neoplasia RACE Registry of Approved Continuing Education SARS severe acute respiratory syndrome SES socioeconomic status PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

xx ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS SHS secondhand smoke SNP single nucleotide polymorphism STR short tandem repeat TBT tributyltin TDCIPP tris(1,3-dichloroisopropyl)phosphate TDS testicular dysgenesis syndrome TME tumor microenvironment TRI Toxics Release Inventory program TRIAD Test of Rapamycin in Aging Dogs clinical trial TVMDL Texas A&M Veterinary Medical Diagnostic Laboratory UFP ultrafine particle VOC volatile organic compound WHICAP Washington Heights/Inwood Columbia Aging Project WHO World Health Organization PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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To examine the potential role of companion animals as sentinels of relevant, shared environmental exposures that may affect human aging and cancer, the National Cancer Policy Forum held a workshop in collaboration with the Forum on Aging, Disability, and Independence and the Standing Committee on the Use of Emerging Science for Environmental Health Decisions to explore this promising and underutilized pathway for research. Presentations and panel discussions covered the current state of the science and pathways for accelerating research, along with opportunities and challenges for using this novel translational approach to exposure science to advance human health. This Proceedings of a Workshop outlines the presentations and discussions that occurred during the workshop.

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