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Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease (2022)

Chapter:Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
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Page444
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
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Page445
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
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Page446
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
×
Page447
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
×
Page448
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
×
Page449
Suggested Citation:"Appendix A: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26554.
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Page450

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Appendix A Committee Member and Staff Biographies Bernard M. Rosof, M.D. (Chair), is a professor in the Department of Medicine at the Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell. He is a member, and past Chair, of the Board of Directors of Huntington Hos- pital (Northwell Health). A practicing internist and gastroenterologist for nearly 30 years, he is at the forefront of national initiatives in the areas of quality and performance improvement. He served on the Board of Direc- tors of the National Quality Forum (NQF), and as co-chair of the National Priorities Partnership (NPP) convened by the NQF to set national priori- ties and goals to transform America’s healthcare. Dr. Rosof is a past chair of the Physician Consortium for Performance Improvement convened by the American Medical Association to lead efforts in developing, testing, and implementing evidence-based performance measures for use at the point of care. He is a Master of the American College of Physicians and Chair Emeritus of the Board of Regents of the American College of Physi- cians. He also served as a member of the Clinical Performance Measure- ment Committee of the National Committee for Quality Assurance and Chair of the Physician Advisory Committee for UnitedHealth Group. He has chaired committees for the New York State Department of Health and the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine, and is the Board Chairman of the Institute for Exceptional Care. Dr. Rosof is on the editorial board of the American Journal of Medical Quality and has published extensively in the peer reviewed medical literature. He received his M.D. from New York University and completed a fellowship in gas- troenterology at Yale School of Medicine.​ 443 PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

444 ENHANCING NIH RESEARCH ON AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE Glinda S. Cooper, Ph.D., is an internationally recognized expert in envi- ronmental epidemiology and women’s health. During her tenure in the Epidemiology Branch of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences from 1993 to 2006, she developed and directed a multidisciplinary research program focusing on occupational and hormonal influences on lupus and other autoimmune diseases. This research program helped establish our understanding of the effects of occupational and environ- mental exposures, particularly silica dust, on autoimmune diseases. Dr. Cooper also led efforts to create and implement an evidence-based, sys- tematic review framework for the evaluation of chemical hazards at the National Center for Environmental Assessment in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and conducted the evaluation of immune-related and reproductive health effects of solvents, pesticides, and other environmen- tal exposures. Since joining the Innocence Project in 2016, Dr. Cooper has focused on efforts to strengthen the scientific basis of forensic disciplines and on evidence-based reforms aimed at reducing wrongful prosecutions and convictions. Dr. Cooper received a Ph.D. from the Department of Epi- demiology of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a Sc.M. in Health Policy and Management from the Harvard School of Public Health. She has published more than 100 peer-reviewed papers based on her research and has been an invited speaker and workshop organizer at numerous international and national meetings. Deidra C. Crews, M.D., Sc.M., is a professor of medicine in the Division of Nephrology at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr. Crews holds appointments with the School of Nursing; the Welch Cen- ter for Prevention, Epidemiology and Clinical Research; the Center on Aging and Health; and the Center for Health Equity, where she is Deputy Director. Her research focuses on addressing disparities in the care and outcomes of kidney disease and hypertension, with a special emphasis on social drivers of these disparities. An elected member of the Ameri- can Society for Clinical Investigation, Dr. Crews has received numerous awards for her research contributions, including the 2018 Johns Hopkins University President’s Frontier Award. She was a National Academy of Medicine (NAM) Emerging Leader in Health and Medicine Scholar and was the inaugural Gilbert S. Omenn Fellow of the NAM. A Master of the American College of Physicians (ACP), in 2019, Dr. Crews received the W. Lester Henry Award for Diversity and Access to Care from the ACP and the Distinguished Leader Award from the American Society of Nephrology. William R. Duncan, Ph.D., is Vice Provost for Research Emeritus at East Tennessee State University. Previously he was Chief Operating PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX A 445 Officer and Chief Scientific Officer of the Baylor Research Institute. At the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, he served as Associate Director of the Therapeutics Research Program in the Division of AIDS beginning in 1993, and then served as Deputy Director of the Division of Allergy, Immunology and Transplantation from 2002 to 2004. He has extensive experience developing and administering national and international research programs, promoting the development of thera- peutic agents and diagnostic tools for the treatment of cancer, infectious diseases and autoimmune diseases. He received his Ph.D. in immunology from the University of Texas Health Science Center at Dallas. DeLisa Fairweather, Ph.D., is associate professor of medicine and director of translational research for the Department of Cardiovascular Diseases at Mayo Clinic. Her  laboratory  conducts translational research focused on finding individualized therapies and improved diagnosis for chronic inflammatory diseases. In addition to an interest in myocarditis, dilated cardiomyopathy, and heart failure, Dr. Fairweather specializes in how sex differences in inflammation caused by environmental exposures lead to chronic inflammatory disease, including rheumatic autoimmune dis- eases, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and lung disease. She has served as a Councilor for the Organization for the Study of Sex Differences for three separate terms over 10 years. She currently has National Institutes of Health funding for three studies on myocarditis. She was a standing member of the Atherosclerosis and Inflammation of the Cardiovascular System Study Section at NIH from 2014–2020, and she serves on the Medi- cal Advisory Board for the Myocarditis Foundation. After earning a Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology at the University of Western Australia, she completed a postdoctoral fellowship in immunology in the labora- tory of Noel R. Rose, M.D., Ph.D., at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is a Co-Investigator and Leader of the Mayo-led FDA/ BARDA-funded Expanded Access Program (EAP) providing convalescent plasma to patients with COVID-19. Sonia Friedman, M.D., is an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and Director of Women’s Health at the Crohn’s and Colitis Center at Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston. She is an adjunct Pro- fessor of Clinical Epidemiology at the University of Southern Denmark in Odense, Denmark. Dr. Friedman completed her undergraduate degree in biology at Stanford University and her MD at Yale Medical School. She did her medical internship and residency at University of Pennsylvania and her gastroenterology fellowship at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City. She is an expert on inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), and her research interests include IBD and fertility and pregnancy. She PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

446 ENHANCING NIH RESEARCH ON AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE is the co-author of the chapter on IBD in Harrison’s Principles of Internal Medicine and is a frequent speaker and invited regional and national lec- turer on the management of IBD. Dr. Friedman is the Deputy Editor of the journal Inflammatory Bowel Diseases and is on the Gastroenterology, Ali- mentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics and Digestive Diseases and Sciences editorial boards. She is a member of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Unbiased Peer Review Task Force, the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Clinical Research Alliance and the organizing committee of the Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Congress. She has received a recent Crohn’s and Colitis Foundation Senior Research Award as well as an American Col- lege of Gastroenterology Clinical Research Award to continue her work on reproductive health in IBD. Lisa I. Iezzoni, M.D., M.Sc., is a professor of medicine at Harvard Medi- cal School based at the Health Policy Research Center at the Mongan Insti- tute at Massachusetts General Hospital. She has conducted health services research for more than 35 years, focusing on two primary areas:  risk adjustment methods for predicting cost and clinical outcomes of care, and health care experiences and outcomes of persons with disabilities. Dr. Iezzoni spent 16 years at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, before moving in 2006 to Massachusetts General Hospital, where from 2009 to 2018 she served as director of the Mongan Institute for Health Policy. She edited Risk Adjustment for Measuring Health Care Outcomes, now in its fourth edition; her most recent book is Making Their Days Happen: Paid Personal Assistance Services Supporting People with Disability Living in Their Homes and Commuities, published in 2022. She is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Iezzoni received her M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health’s Health Policy and Management pro- gram and her M.D. from Harvard Medical School. Andrea M. Knight, M.D., M.S.C.E., is an associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Toronto Temerty Faculty of Medicine, and a staff phy- sician in the Division of Rheumatology at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, where she is an associate scientist in the Neurosciences and Mental Health Program of the Research Institute. She is also an adjunct assistant professor of pediatrics in the associated faculty of the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and a faculty scholar at PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP). Dr. Knight’s research focuses on mental health in youth with rheumatologic condi- tions, with an emphasis on neuropsychiatric function in childhood-onset systemic lupus erythematosus (cSLE). She has investigated the burden of psychiatric morbidity and strategies to improve comprehensive care for youth with SLE and other rheumatologic disease. She is also investigating PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX A 447 the impact of cSLE on brain structure, function, and development. She is currently co-leading a CDC-funded project investigating epidemiology and outcomes in cSLE. Her work has been recognized by her receipt of the Mary Betty Stevens M.D., Young Investigator Prize from the Lupus Foundation of America (LFA), and the Dubois Memorial Lectureship from the American College of Rheumatology. She currently serves as chair of the Lupus Committee and co-leader of the Mental Health Workgroup for the Childhood Arthritis and Rheumatology Research Alliance, member of the LFA Medical Scientific Advisory Council, and member of the Lupus Research Alliance Scientific Review Committee. Dr. Knight received her M.D. from the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Columbia Univer- sity. She completed a residency in pediatrics and a fellowship in pediatric rheumatology at CHOP. She earned her M.S.C.E. from the University of Pennsylvania.  Scott M. Lieberman, M.D., Ph.D., is associate professor of pediatrics in the Division of Rheumatology, Allergy and Immunology at Carver Col- lege of Medicine, University of Iowa. His research goals are to understand the earliest immunologic events in the development of organ-specific autoimmunity to identify potential targets for better diagnosis and treat- ment of these diseases. The main focus of his laboratory is the role of T cells in the initiation of lacrimal and salivary gland autoimmunity characteristic of Sjögren’s disease. He currently has National Institutes of Health funding for a study on the role of cytokines in T-cell dysregulation in lacrimal gland autoimmunity. He also cares for children with rheu- matic diseases and participates in efforts to better understand Sjögren’s in children through an international collaborative workgroup. He has co-authored several book chapters on rheumatic disease manifestations in children including, most recently, the chapter on Sjögren’s in children in Sjögren’s Syndrome: A Clinical Handbook (Elsevier). He received the Arthritis Foundation’s Stewart J. McCracken Award for excellence in the field of arthritis research, and he was awarded an American Association of Immunologists Careers in Immunology Fellowship. He earned his Ph.D. in immunology and his M.D. at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He performed a residency in pediatrics (ABP Special Alternative Path- way) at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, where he also completed a fellowship in pediatric rheumatology.  Michael D. Lockshin, M.D., is the director of the Barbara Volcker Center for Women and Rheumatic Disease at Hospital for Special Surgery (HSS) in New York and professor of medicine and obstetrics-gynecology at Weill Cornell Medicine. As a medical student he cared for a seriously ill pregnant woman with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), and he has PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

448 ENHANCING NIH RESEARCH ON AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE focused his career on patients with this disease. He was one of the first physicians to associate the newly discovered antiphospholipid antibody with pregnancy complications. Dr. Lockshin has had a long-standing inter- est in the overlap of autoimmune diseases such as SLE, multiple sclerosis, and thyroid disease, and in sex differences in disease incidence. He is also working to create consensus to systematize approaches for confronting diagnostic uncertainty for patients with conditions that do not fall within clear diagnostic criteria. A member of the faculty of Weill Cornell Medical College and a staff rheumatologist at HSS and New York Hospital (now Weill Cornell Medicine) from 1970 to 1989, he became Extramural director, then acting director, of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculo- skeletal and Skin Diseases in 1989. He returned to HSS in 1997 to head the Barbara Volcker Center. He also served as an Epidemic Intelligence Service Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service of the Communicable Disease Center (now Centers for Disease Control), where he focused on environmental causes of rheumatic illnesses. Dr. Lockshin has served as editor-in-chief of Arthritis and Rheumatism, rheumatology’s premier jour- nal. He has served on several National Academy of Medicine committees. Dr. Lockshin received his M.D. from Harvard Medical School, and he completed his medical residency at Second (Cornell) Medical Service at Bellevue Hospital and Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and his rheumatology fellowship at Columbia-Presbyterian Hospital (now New York-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center). He has written three lay language books that discuss how doctors and patients interact regarding chronic illnesses and diagnostic uncertainty. Jill M. Norris, Ph.D., M.P.H., is professor and chair of the Department of Epidemiology in the Colorado School of Public Health at the University of Colorado Denver Anschutz Campus. Dr. Norris’ research has focused on the relationship between diet and other environmental exposures and the development of autoimmune diseases—including type 1 diabetes, celiac disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and lupus—using longitudinal cohort stud- ies in which genetically at-risk individuals are followed for the appear- ance of autoantibodies and subsequent progression to clinical disease. She has taken part (as principal investigator or co-investigator) in multiple NIH-funded studies of autoimmune diseases, and she is currently funded to examine dietary, metabolomic, epigenetic and transcriptomic factors involved in the progression from autoimmunity to type 1 diabetes. She was a member of the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Expert Panel to Examine the Role of the Environment in the Development of Autoimmune Disease. She was a contributor to Diabetes in America (3rd ed., 2016–2018), published by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases. She is an elected member of the American PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

APPENDIX A 449 Epidemiological Society. She received her M.P.H. and Ph.D. in epidemiol- ogy from the University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health. Emily C. Somers, Ph.D., Sc.M., is associate professor of internal medi- cine-rheumatology, of environmental health sciences, and of obstetrics and gynecology at the University of Michigan Schools of Medicine and Public Health. She specializes in autoimmune diseases, particularly lupus, and her work spans epidemiologic, clinical, and translational research, including the design and conduct of clinical trials. She has performed leading population-based studies of lupus epidemiology in the United Kingdom, Denmark, and United States. Major research interests include epidemiology, comorbidities, and public health impact of rheumatic and autoimmune diseases; clinical epidemiology of systemic lupus erythema- tosus (SLE), including studies of subclinical cardiovascular disease in SLE and gene expression-based molecular classification of lupus nephritis; and pharmacoepidemiologic issues in autoimmune disease. Her work in pharmacoepidemiology has characterized risk of drug-induced lupus, as well as developmental outcomes among offspring of mothers whose pregnancies occurred in the presence of SLE. She has received National Institutes of Health funding and currently receives U.S. Centers for Dis- ease Control and Prevention funding for research investigating early life exposures to metals and development of immune dysfunction. She received her Sc.M. and Ph.D. in epidemiology from the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, and from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Public Health, respectively. Barbara G. Vickrey, M.D., M.P.H., is professor and System Chair of Neu- rology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai.  She specializes in translating clinical evidence into improvements in routine medical practice to improve patient health. Among her accomplishments are demonstrating that collaboration among health care systems, community organizations, and caregivers can improve quality of care and outcomes for dementia patients. She has designed health-care delivery innovations ranging from better control of post-stroke risk factors in underserved populations to new ways to care for veterans with Parkinson’s disease. Dr. Vickrey is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. Dr. Vick- rey served for 25 years on the faculty of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), where she was professor of neurology and director of the departmental Health Services Research Program. She was also associ- ate director for research at the Greater Los Angeles Veterans Administra- tion Parkinson’s Disease Research, Education and Clinical Center. Dr. Vickrey earned her M.D. at Duke University School of Medicine and her M.P.H. at the UCLA School of Public Health. She completed postgraduate PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

450 ENHANCING NIH RESEARCH ON AUTOIMMUNE DISEASE clinical training in medicine and neurology at the University of Washing- ton in Seattle, and then research fellowships in the Robert Wood Johnson Clinical Scholars. STAFF Rose Marie Martinez, Sc.D., is the Director of the Board on Popula- tion Health and Public Health Practice (1999–present) at the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The Board conducts evidence based studies that help shape health policy at the federal, state and local level. Prior to joining the National Academies, Dr. Martinez was a Senior Health Researcher at Mathematica Policy Research (1995–1999) where she conducted health policy research. Dr. Martinez is a former Assistant Director for Health Financing and Policy with the U.S. General Accounting Office where she directed evaluations and policy analysis in the area of national and public health issues (1988–1995). Her experience also includes six years directing research studies for the Regional Health Ministry of Madrid, Spain (1982–1988). Dr. Martinez received the degree of Doctor of Science from the Johns Hopkins School of Hygiene and Pub- lic Health. Kristin E. White is an associate program officer in the Health and Medi- cine Division of the National Academies. She worked for several years as a medical editor and writer, working on Continuing Medical Education programs and other forms of medical education. She received an A.B. from Princeton University. Dara Rosenberg, M.P.H., is a research associate in the Health and Medi- cine Division on the Board of Population Health and Public Health Practice. Before joining the National Academies, Ms. Rosenberg was an epidemiologist at a local health department. She has experience with com- municable disease investigations, public health emergency preparedness, and data analysis, specifically with STI/HIV and COVID-19 data. She completed her B.S. in Health Sciences at New York Institute of Technol- ogy and has a Master of Public Health in Epidemiology from The George Washington University. PREPUBLICATION COPY—Uncorrected Proofs

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Autoimmune diseases occur when the body's immune system malfunctions and mistakenly attacks healthy cells, tissues, and organs. Strong data on the incidence and prevalence of autoimmune diseases are limited, but a 2009 study estimated the prevalence of autoimmune diseases in the U.S. to be 7.6 to 9.4 percent, or 25 to 31 million people today. This estimate, however, includes only 29 autoimmune diseases, and it does not account for increases in prevalence in the last decade. By some counts, there are around 150 autoimmune diseases, which are lifelong chronic illnesses with no known cures. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine was asked to assess the autoimmune disease research portfolio of the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease finds that while NIH has made impressive contributions to research on autoimmune diseases, there is an absence of a strategic NIH-wide autoimmune disease research plan and a need for greater coordination across the institutes and centers to optimize opportunities for collaboration. To meet these challenges, this report calls for the creation of an Office of Autoimmune Disease/Autoimmunity Research in the Office of the Director of NIH. The Office could facilitate NIH-wide collaboration, and engage in prioritizing, budgeting, and evaluating research. Enhancing NIH Research on Autoimmune Disease also calls for the establishment of long term systems to collect epidemiologic and surveillance data and long term studies (20+ years) to study disease across the life course. Finally, the report provides an agenda that highlights research needs that crosscut many autoimmune diseases, such as understanding the effect of environmental factors in initiating disease.

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