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Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop (2022)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
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Appendix B

Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters

KATHARINE G. ABRAHAM (Presenter) is distinguished university professor of economics and survey methodology at the University of Maryland, College Park. Her published research includes papers on the contingent workforce, the work and retirement decisions of older Americans, unemployment and job vacancies, and the measurement of economic activity. Abraham is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a distinguished fellow of the American Economic Association, and a fellow of both the American Statistical Association and the Society of Labor Economists. She has a Ph.D. in economics from Harvard University.

DEIRDRE BLOOME (Presenter) is professor of public policy at the Harvard Kennedy School and faculty member at the Harvard Center for Population and Development Studies. Her current research focuses on a demographic approach toward investigating how patterns of social inequality are produced and reproduced. Bloome’s prior work focused on the relationships among socioeconomic inequality, mobility, and insecurity; the historical evolution of racial inequalities in the family and economy; and statistical methods for characterizing population heterogeneity. She has received multiple awards including The William Julius Wilson Early Career Award from the American Sociological Association’s Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility section. Bloome has a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Harvard University.

DANIEL BOTTING (Presenter) is a senior data analyst at Impactful, a collective impact organization that uses data to drive systemic change across

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

the cradle to career continuum, with the goal that all children in Tulsa have every opportunity to succeed. Botting has an M.A. in public policy and applied economics from the University of Michigan.

JENNIE E. BRAND (Presenter) is professor of sociology and statistics at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). She is also director of the California Center for Population Research and co-director of the Center for Social Statistics at UCLA. Brand serves as chair of the Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility Section of the American Sociological Association (ASA). She was elected to the Sociological Research Association in 2019, and received the ASA Methodology Leo Goodman Mid-Career Award in 2016. She also serves as a member of the Technical Review Committee for the National Longitudinal Surveys Program at the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Brand is associate editor of Science Advances. Her research focuses on social stratification and inequality, and its implications for various outcomes that indicate life chances. Brand holds a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

TYSON BROWN (Presenter) is associate professor of sociology at Duke University, inaugural presidential fellow, and director of the Center on Health and Society. His program of research examines the who, when, and how questions regarding racial inequalities in health and wealth. Brown has authored numerous articles in leading sociology, population health and health policy journals, and his research contributions have been recognized with awards from the American Sociological Association. He is currently working on several projects that address fundamental questions about racial stratification by conceptualizing, measuring, and mapping structural racism, as well as quantifying its impact on the life chances. Brown serves on the board of directors of the Population Association of America, as well as on the editorial boards of several journals, including Demography, Social Forces, and the Journal of Health and Social Behavior. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

COURTNEY C. COILE (Chair of Planning Committee) is professor of economics at Wellesley College. She is also a research associate of the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER), where she serves as co-director of the NBER Retirement and Disability Research Center and co-director of the International Social Security project. Coile’s research focuses on the economics of aging and health, with particular interests in retirement decisions, health trends, and public programs used by older and disabled populations. She is co-author of Reconsidering Retirement: How Losses and Layoffs Affect Older Workers, and co-editor of the Social Security Programs and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

Retirement Around the World series. She is a current member of the National Academies’ standing Committee on Population. Coile has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

WILLIAM DARITY JR. (Presenter) is Samuel DuBois Cook professor of public policy, African and African American studies, and economics, and director of the Samuel DuBois Cook Center on Social Equity at Duke University. Previously, he served as chair of the Department of African and African American Studies and was founding director of the Research Network on Racial and Ethnic Inequality at Duke. Darity’s research focuses on inequality by race, class, and ethnicity; stratification economics; schooling and the racial achievement gap; North-South theories of trade and development; skin shade and labor market outcomes; the economics of reparations; the Atlantic slave trade and the Industrial Revolution; the history of economics; and the social psychological effects of exposure to unemployment. Darity has a Ph.D. in economics from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

GREG DUNCAN (Presenter) is distinguished professor in the School of Education at the University of California, Irvine. His recent work focuses on estimating the role of school-entry skills and behaviors on later school achievement and attainment and the effects of increasing income inequality on schools and children’s life chances. Duncan is part of a team conducting a random-assignment trial assessing impacts of income supplements on the cognitive development of infants born to poor mothers in four diverse U.S. communities. He was elected to the National Academy of Sciences in 2010. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Michigan.

WENDY EDELBERG (Planning Committee Member) is director of The Hamilton Project and a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution in Washington, DC. She also serves as principal at WestExec Advisors. Most recently, Edelberg was chief economist at the Congressional Budget Office. She worked on issues related to macroeconomics, housing, and consumer spending at the President’s Council of Economic Advisers during two administrations. Before that, she worked on those same issues at the Federal Reserve Board. Edelberg is a macroeconomist whose research has spanned a wide range of topics, from household spending and saving decisions, to the economic effects of fiscal policy, to systemic risks in the financial system. She has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

JOSEPH FERRIE (Presenter) is professor of economics and history at Northwestern University, where he has taught since 1991. He is also a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Ferrie’s research focuses on intergenerational economic and social mobility and the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

later-life impacts of early-life economic and environmental circumstances. His work has appeared in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, and the Quarterly Journal of Economics. He is the author of Yankeys Now: Immigrants in the Antebellum U.S. 1840-1860 (Oxford University Press, 1999). Ferrie has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Chicago.

KATIE R. GENADEK (Presenter) is director of the Decennial Census Digitization and Linkage (DCDL) project at the U.S. Census Bureau. The DCDL project includes digitizing images of the 1960-1990 Censuses, capturing information from the images, and linking these data into the U.S. Census Bureau’s Data Linkage Infrastructure. Genadek also works on supporting research through the Federal Statistical Research Data Centers by documenting and disseminating the U.S. Census Bureau’s linked data. She previously worked at the University of Minnesota, where she managed the IPUMS-USA data project and directed the outreach efforts for all IPUMS data projects. Genadek is a demographer and economist, and her research is focused on the relationship between policy, work, family, and time use. She holds a Ph.D. in applied economics from the University of Minnesota.

ROBERT GREENSTEIN (Presenter) is a visiting fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution, where he is affiliated with The Hamilton Project. He is founder and president emeritus of the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. Greenstein was appointed by President Clinton in 1994 to serve on the Bipartisan Commission on Entitlement and Tax Reform and headed the part of President Obama’s transition team that dealt with the federal budget. His work has focused on the federal budget and programs and policies affecting people with low or modest incomes, on which he has written extensively. In 1996, he was awarded a MacArthur fellowship for making “the Center a model for a non-partisan research and policy organization.” Greenstein was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and received the Daniel Patrick Moynihan prize from the American Academy of Political and Social Science, which cited him as “a champion of evidence-based policy.” He has an A.B. from Harvard University.

FIONA GREIG (Presenter) is managing director and co-president at the JPMorgan Chase Institute, which delivers data-rich analyses and expert insights for the public good. She joined the Institute in 2014 after serving as deputy budget director for the City of Philadelphia. Greig previously served as a consultant for McKinsey & Company and in 2009 she started and ran Bank on DC, a financial inclusion program for the District of Columbia. She has published research on topics including household finance,

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

health care, labor markets and the Online Platform Economy, gender, and behavioral decision making. Greig has a Ph.D. in public policy from Harvard University.

DAVID B. GRUSKY (Presenter) is Edward Ames Edmonds professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences, professor of sociology, senior fellow at the Stanford Institute for Economic Policy Research, faculty fellow at the Center for Population Health Sciences, director of the Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality, co-editor of Pathways Magazine, and a member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. His research addresses such topics as trends in inequality, poverty, and mobility in the United States; new approaches to reducing poverty and increasing mobility; and new data infrastructures for monitoring trends and crises and evaluating interventions. Grusky has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

KATHLEEN MULLAN HARRIS (Planning Committee Member) is James E. Haar distinguished professor of sociology, adjunct professor of public policy, and faculty fellow at the Carolina Population Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her career has focused on social inequality and health with particular interests in health disparities, bio-demography, sociogenomics, and life course and aging processes. Harris served as director and principal investigator of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (Add Health). Her recent research has examined the health effects of despair, isolation, and stress; social genetic effects; health costs of upward mobility; and the obesity epidemic and young adult health. She was awarded the Golden Goose Award from the U.S. Congress in 2016 for major breakthroughs in medicine, social behavior, and technological research. Harris is an elected member of the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and an elected fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. She has a Ph.D. in demography from the University of Pennsylvania.

TOMÁS JIMÉNEZ (Presenter) is professor of sociology and comparative studies in race and ethnicity at Stanford University. He is also director of the undergraduate program on urban studies. His research and writing focus on immigration, assimilation, social mobility, and ethnic and racial identity. Jiménez’s forthcoming book, States of Belonging: Immigration Policies, Attitudes, and Inclusion, uses survey data and in-depth interviews to understand how state-level immigration policies shape belonging among Latino immigrants, U.S.-born Latinos, and U.S.-born Whites in Arizona and New Mexico. He has published his research in Science, American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Proceedings of the National

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

Academy of Sciences, Social Problems, International Migration Review, and many others. He has a Ph.D. from Stanford University.

JENNIFER LEE (Presenter) is Julian Clarence Levi professor of social sciences at Columbia University. Her wide-ranging research addresses morally urgent questions about the implications of contemporary U.S. immigration—particularly Asian immigration—on the native-born population. Lee is a board member of the Obama Presidency Oral History, a trustee of the Russell Sage Foundation, and a senior researcher at AAPI Data, which recently received a $10 million grant to study anti-Asian discrimination and hate. Committed to public engagement, Lee is a contributor for Science and the Brookings Institution, and has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, and other media outlets. She was recently invited by the Biden-Harris Administration to present her research on xenophobia, discrimination, and anti-Asian hate to COVID-19 Health Equity Task Force. She has a Ph.D. in sociology from Columbia University.

DANIEL T. LICHTER (Presenter) is Ferris Family professor emeritus of life course studies in the Department of Policy Analysis and Management at Cornell University. Lichter has published widely on topics such as population and public policy and for over four decades he has centered much of his work on the changing social and economic conditions of rural America. His most recent work has focused on rural depopulation over the past century, and on fertility and reproductive health in small-town America. He has provided new national estimates of racial residential segregation in Hispanic “boom towns” in the Midwest and South, focusing on the spatial assimilation and economic incorporation of the new immigrants into local communities. Lichter’s most recent paper A Demographic Lifeline to Rural America: Latino Population Growth in New Destinations, 1990-2019 was published in Investing in Rural Prosperity by the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis in 2021. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

TREVON D. LOGAN (Planning Committee Member) is Hazel C. Youngberg trustees distinguished professor of economics and associate dean in the College of Arts and Sciences at The Ohio State University. He also serves as a research associate in the Development of the American Economy Program and director of the Race and Stratification in the Economy Working Group at the National Bureau of Economic Research. Logan is currently co-director of the American Economic Association’s Mentoring Program and a member of the editorial boards of the Journal of Economic Literature and the Journal of Economic Perspectives. His current research focuses on racial inequality and economic history. He is currently a member of the National Academies’ planning com-

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

mittee on Strengthening the Evidence Base to Improve Economic and Social Mobility in the United States and a current member of the National Academies’ Committee on Population. Logan has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of California, Berkeley.

FABIAN T. PFEFFER (Planning Committee Member) is associate professor and associate chair of the Department of Sociology and research associate professor at the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. He also serves as director of the Center for Inequality Dynamics and as a co-investigator of the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Pfeffer’s research investigates social inequality and its maintenance across generations and time. Current projects focus on wealth inequality and its consequences for the next generation, social mobility across multiple generations, the maintenance of inequality through education, and the effects of experiencing social mobility. He is the recipient of the Early Career Award from the American Sociological Association’s section on Inequality, Poverty, and Mobility and the section on Sociology of Education. Pfeffer has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

PATRICK SHARKEY (Presenter) is William S. Tod professor of sociology and public affairs at the Princeton University Woodrow Wilson School of Public & International Affairs. Sharkey was formerly chair of sociology at New York University, served as scientific director at the Crime Lab in New York, and was the founder of AmericanViolence.org. He has a Ph.D. in sociology and social policy from Harvard University.

MARIO LUIS SMALL (Planning Committee Member) is Grafstein family professor in the Department of Sociology at Harvard University. Small’s published work focuses on urban poverty, personal networks, and the relationship between qualitative and quantitative methods. He is currently studying the relationship between networks and decision-making, the ability of large-scale data to answer critical questions about poverty, and the role qualitative inquiry in cumulative social science. Small has authored numerous books, including Villa Victoria: The Transformation of Social Capital in a Boston Barrio and Unanticipated Gains: Origins of Network Inequality in Everyday Life. He currently serves as the University of Bremen excellence chair and as a board member of International Network for Social Network Analysis. Small is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He has a Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University.

C. MATTHEW SNIPP (Planning Committee Member) is Burnet C. and Milfred Finley Wohlford professor of sociology at Stanford University. He has written extensively on American Indians, focusing specifically on the

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×

interaction of American Indians and the U.S. Census. Prior to moving to Stanford, Snipp was associate professor and professor of rural sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison, where he held affiliate appointments with several other units, and assistant and associate professor of sociology at the University of Maryland. He has also served on the U.S. Census Bureau’s Racial and Ethnic Advisory Committee and on the Board of Scientific Counselors for the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Center for Health Statistics. A current member of the National Academies’ Committee on National Statistics, he has served on numerous National Academies panels including the Panel on Research on Future Census Methods (2010 planning), Panel on Residence Rules in the Decennial Census, Panel to Review the 2010 Census, and the Standing Committee on Reengineering Census Operations. Snipp has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Wisconsin–Madison.

XI SONG (Presenter) is associate professor of sociology and demography at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research interests include social stratification and mobility, inequality, population studies, and quantitative methodology. Song’s research has demonstrated the values of genealogical microdata for studying long-term family and population changes. As a quantitative methodologist, she developed Markov chain demography models for genealogical processes, multivariate mixed-effects location-scale models for the interplay of inequality generating process across life stages and generations, population estimation for overlapping generations and kinship network, and weighting methods for reconciling prospective and retrospective mobility estimates. Song has a Ph.D. in sociology from the University of California, Los Angeles.

MATTHEW STAIGER (Presenter) is research scientist at Opportunity Insights. His research investigates the determinants of economic opportunity with the goal of identifying policies that would be effective at promoting upward mobility. During graduate school, he participated in the Pathways Internship at the U.S. Census Bureau and was a dissertation scholar at the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. He has a Ph.D. in economics from the University of Maryland.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 103
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 104
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 105
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 106
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 107
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 108
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 109
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographies of Planning Committee Members and Presenters." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2022. Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26598.
×
Page 110
Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
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 Research and Data Priorities for Improving Economic and Social Mobility: Proceedings of a Workshop
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Since around 1980, fewer Americans than before are doing better than their parents had – that is, more are experiencing downward social and economic mobility in terms of occupational status and income. This trend in downward mobility is occurring amidst high and rising levels of inequality in income, wealth, health, and life expectancy. To better understand the factors that influence social and economic mobility, the Committee on Population and the Committee on National Statistics hosted a workshop on February 14-15, 2022. The proceedings from this workshop identify key priorities for future research and data collection to improve social and economic mobility.

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