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Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop (2023)

Chapter: Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
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C

Planning Committee Biographical Information

OLIVIA A. GRAEVE, Chair, joined the University of California (UC), San Diego, in 2012 and is currently the Jacobs Faculty Scholar and Professor in the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, the director of the CaliBaja Center for Resilient Materials and Systems, and the director of the Materials Science and Engineering Program. Graeve holds a PhD in materials science and engineering (2001) from UC Davis and a BS in structural engineering (1995) from UC San Diego. Graeve’s area of research focuses on the design and processing of new materials for extreme environments, including extremes of temperature, pressure, and radiation. Graeve has been involved in many activities related to the recruitment and retention of women and Hispanic students in science and engineering and has received several prestigious awards, including the Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics, and Engineering Mentoring in 2020. Graeve has been inducted into the Tijuana Walk of Fame (2014), the Mexican Academy of Engineering (2016), the Mexican Academy of Sciences (2019), the Latin American Academy of Sciences (2022), and has been named a fellow of the American Ceramic Society (2017) and the American Association for the Advancement of Science (2021).

STEFANO CURTAROLO is the Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. Distinguished Professor of Materials Science, Electrical Engineering and Physics, and the director of the Center for Autonomous Materials Design at Duke University. Curtarolo’s research interests lie at the intersection of materials science, artificial intelligence, and autonomous discovery of new materials. Current research focuses on theory and the discovery of disordered superhard and ultra-high-temperature ceramics and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
×

machine learning approaches to phase stability of alloys. Curtarolo directs the Center for Autonomous Materials Design, which has started and currently maintains the AFLOW international data consortium about materials-information and tools for millions of compounds. The center and the consortium have also organized several educational and outreach initiatives in accelerated materials design (aflow.org/seminars). Curtarolo currently leads a MURI team, awarded in 2021, on “SPICES: Spinodal-Hardened High-Entropy Ceramics.” Curtarolo has received many national and international awards and recognitions (e.g., Office of Naval Research Yip, National Science Foundation (NSF) CAREER award, PECASE, IUPAP, Humboldt-Bessel, Highly-Cited 2021). Curtarolo earned a PhD in materials science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

KARIN DAHMEN is a professor in the Department of Physics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before joining the faculty at the University of Illinois in 1999, Dahmen was a junior fellow at Harvard University. Dahmen’s research interests are in soft condensed matter physics, including nonequilibrium dynamical systems, hysteresis, avalanches, earthquakes, population biology, and disorder-induced critical behavior. Dahmen is also interested in other aspects of condensed matter physics and mathematical physics, and in areas of biophysics and geophysics, where methods of condensed matter physics can be fruitfully applied. Dahmen is a fellow of the American Physical Society, an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Research Fellow, and was awarded a Guggenheim fellowship in 2016. Dahmen earned a PhD in physics from Cornell University.

ALISDAIR RICHARD DAVEY is the Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope Data Center Scientist. Davey provides an interface between the data center staff and the scientific staff. Davey is responsible for the quality of the calibrated data to be distributed to the solar and heliospheric communities. Research areas include atomic physics, solar physics including space weather and computer vision for solar feature, and event detection. In addition, Davey is one of the principal architects of the Virtual Solar Observatory, providing homogeneous access to heterogeneous data to the community for the past 20 years. Davey has more recently taken part in a NASA workshop to create a data discovery service that enables access to all of NASA’s science data and was part of the @HDMIEC RCN Working Group that published a white paper on Uniform Semantics and Syntax of Solar Observations and Event. Davey earned a PhD in atomic physics from the University College London.

SARYU JINDAL FENSIN is a staff scientist and team leader for the quasi-static and dynamic behavior of materials team at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Research interests focus on the role of heterogeneities and defects on the dynamic behavior of materials. Fensin’s unique skills are related to coupling both experiments and

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
×

modeling efforts to not only understand the mechanisms that contribute to damage in metals but also working with modeling collaborators in implementing some of these insights into the current strength and damage models. Fensin’s skills in this area are nationally recognized as demonstrated by requests for external collaborations in Stockpile Stewardship Academic Alliance and other projects (UC San Diego, Pennsylvania State University, Johns Hopkins University, UC Berkeley, Case Western Reserve University, and Texas A&M University), requests to review proposals for the Division of Bioengineering and Environmental Systems at NSF and the National Nuclear Security Administration, and requests to review articles for premier journals in the field. Fensin earned a PhD in materials science and engineering from UC Davis.

ANDREW MURPHY MINOR is a professor at UC Berkeley in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering and holds a joint appointment at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) as the facility director of the National Center for Electron Microscopy in the Molecular Foundry. Minor’s areas of research focus are nanomechanics, metallurgy, electron characterization of soft matter, and in situ transmission electron microscopy technique development. Minor’s honors include the LBNL Materials Science Division Outstanding Performance Award (2006 and 2010), the American Institute of Mining, Metallurgical, and Petroleum Engineers’ Robert Lansing Hardy Award from the Minerals, Metals & Materials Society (2012), and the Burton Medal from the Microscopy Society of America (2015). Minor was also elected president of the Microscopy Society of America for 2023. Minor earned a PhD in materials science and engineering from UC Berkeley.

ANDRES MUNOZ-JARAMILLO is a senior research scientist at the Southwest Research Institute and a visiting scholar at the University Corporation for Atmospheric Research’s High Altitude Observatory and the National Solar Observatory in Boulder, Colorado. Research interests include understanding and predicting the solar magnetic cycle and its impact on solar variability, space climate, and terrestrial climate change. Munoz-Jaramillo uses advanced techniques of deep learning, data mining and analysis, and data visualization to accelerate discovery from large volumes of data. Munoz-Jaramillo was awarded a Jack Eddy Postdoctoral Fellowship and the American Geophysical Union’s Fred L. Scarf award. Munoz-Jaramillo earned a PhD from Montana State University.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
×
Page 86
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
×
Page 87
Suggested Citation:"Appendix C: Planning Committee Biographical Information." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Frontiers in Data Analytics and Monitoring Tools for Extreme Materials: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/26983.
×
Page 88
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One of the major challenges in materials science today is developing materials that can survive and function in extreme environments, such as the high-radiation environments found in a fission or fusion reactor or the ultra-high temperature experienced by a hypervelocity vessel or a spacecraft traveling through Earths atmosphere on its return to the planets surface. What is needed to discover such materials was the topic of a 2-day workshop held at the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine on October 5-6, 2022. That workshop, titled Materials in Extreme Environments: New Monitoring Tools and Data-Driven Approaches, brought together an international collection of experts on the testing and measurement of materials in extreme environments and on discovering and developing new materials. This Proceedings of a Workshop recaps the presentations and discussions that took place during the 2 days of the workshop.

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