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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 2: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Harnessing Innovative Biotechnologies for National Security in Material and Human Dimensions: Abridged Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27023.
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APPENDIX 2
Biographical Sketches of Committee Members

Diane DiEuliis (Chair) is a Distinguished Research Fellow at the National Defense University. Her research areas focus on emerging biological technologies, biodefense, and preparedness for biothreats. Specific topic areas under this broad research portfolio include dual-use life sciences research; synthetic biology; the U.S. bioeconomy; disaster recovery; and behavioral, cognitive, and social science as they relate to important aspects of deterrence and preparedness. Dr. DiEuliis teaches an elective biotechnology course and guest lectures in foundational professional military education courses. Dr. DiEuliis served as the assistant director for life sciences in several administrations in the Office of Science and Technology Policy (OSTP) at the White House. Prior to working at OSTP, Dr. DiEuliis was a program director at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), where she managed a diverse portfolio of neuroscience research in neurodegenerative diseases. She completed a fellowship at the University of Pennsylvania in the Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research, and completed her postdoctoral research in the NIH Intramural Research Program, where she focused on cellular and molecular neuroscience. Dr. DiEuliis has a Ph.D. in biology from the University of Delaware, in Newark, Delaware.

Catherine R. Cabrera is the group leader of Group 23, Biological & Chemical Technologies, at the MIT Lincoln Laboratory (LL). Dr. Cabrera has been working to address urgent needs in biodefense and pathogen countermeasures for more than 20 years, focused on translating research into operational capabilities. Her expertise includes chemical and biological engineering, molecular diagnostics and pathogen identification, systems analysis, and forensics and attribution. She received her B.A. degrees in biochemistry and chemical engineering from Rice University and her Ph.D. in bioengineering from the University of Washington. Her Ph.D. research was focused on developing fieldable technologies to detect pathogens in resource-limited environments. She maintained that focus when she joined MIT LL in 2002, initially working on hardware and software development for biowarfare agent identification, again for field-forward applications. Dr. Cabrera has been part of several R&D 100 award-winning teams, including one for an automated cell-based bioaerosol sensor, which has since transitioned to operational use for building protection and plant pathogen detection. She currently oversees a diverse program portfolio, which includes rapid medical countermeasure development, cyber/bio/artificial intelligence convergence, molecular biomarkers for heath and performance, connections between the microbiome and human performance, advanced DNA forensics, and engineered and synthetic biology research and development.

Amy Herr is the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Professor at the University of California (UC), Berkeley. Her bioengineering research laboratory focuses on the design and development of novel analytical methods to answer fundamental questions in biology and medicine. Professor Herr earned her Ph.D. in mechanical engineering at Stanford University as a National Science Foundation (NSF) Graduate Research Fellow (2002) and a B.S. in engineering and applied science at Caltech (1997). Prior to joining UC Berkeley, Professor Herr was a research scientist at Sandia National Laboratories (2002–2007). Her research has been recognized by a National Institutes of Health (NIH) New Innovator Award, NSF CAREER Award, Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship, and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) Young Faculty Award, among others. Presently, she serves on the National Advisory Council for Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering at NIH (2020–2023) and for DARPA’s Biotechnology Office (2020–2023). She has served as a standing member of the NIH Nanotechnology Study Section (2013–2019) and was one of 13 U.S. faculty appointed to DARPA’s Defense Science Study Group (2018–2019). Professor Herr has chaired all three major scientific meetings in her field, is a successful entrepreneur, and has been recognized for her advising and mentoring.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix 2: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Harnessing Innovative Biotechnologies for National Security in Material and Human Dimensions: Abridged Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27023.
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Andrew Kilianski is currently the senior director of emerging infectious diseases at IAVI. At IAVI he leads strategy development, key stakeholder engagement, and current and future execution of IAVI’s emerging infectious disease vaccine and therapeutic portfolios. Prior to IAVI, Dr. Kilianski was a senior scientist and program manager with the Department of Defense (DoD). He has led numerous scientific, analytic, and programmatic efforts related to the military applications of biotechnology and the national security implications of worldwide scientific advances across emerging technologies. Additionally, he has been a key resource for the drafting of multiple National Security Memoranda and DoD Directives and Instructions, and has been at the forefront of emerging technology policy development within the U.S. government. As a result of his collaborative leadership across government and with nongovernmental organizations and foreign partners, Dr. Kilianski and his teams have received numerous awards from the Secretary of Defense, the Secretary of Health and Human Services, and the Director of National Intelligence. Dr. Kilianski started his scientific career as a National Academy of Sciences Fellow with the U.S. Army, working as a principal investigator on research programs aimed at characterizing emerging infectious disease threats with next-generation sequencing and other multi-omics approaches. Additionally, he is a faculty member at George Mason University in the Schar School of Government, where he teaches courses on emerging infectious diseases and the integration of emerging biotechnologies into biodefense and biosurveillance systems. He received his Ph.D. in microbiology and immunology from Loyola University Chicago, where he discovered virus–host interactions necessary for coronavirus pathogenesis and leveraged these pathways for vaccine design and antiviral drug development.

Mary Maxon is the executive director of BioFutures at Schmidt Futures, a philanthropic effort focused on maximizing the potential of biotechnology toward a circular U.S. bioeconomy. Previously she was the associate laboratory director for biosciences at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and before that she was assistant director for biological research at the Office of Science and Technology Policy where she was the principal author of the Obama administration’s National Bioeconomy Blueprint. Currently, Dr. Maxon serves as a U.S. Department of State–appointed delegate to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development’s Biotechnology, Nanotechnology, and Converging Technologies Working Party. She is also a member of the Global Bioeconomy International Advisory Council, and a member of the Carnegie Institution for Science Board of Trustees. She was the program lead for the Marine Microbiology Initiative at the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the first executive director of the Science Philanthropy Alliance, and also has extensive experience in industry in a number of biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies. Dr. Maxon holds a Ph.D. in molecular cell biology from the University of California, Berkeley, and did postdoctoral training in genetics at the University of California, San Francisco.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix 2: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Harnessing Innovative Biotechnologies for National Security in Material and Human Dimensions: Abridged Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27023.
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix 2: Biographical Sketches of Committee Members." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Harnessing Innovative Biotechnologies for National Security in Material and Human Dimensions: Abridged Version. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27023.
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