National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: Acronyms and Abbreviations
Page 251
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 251
Page 252
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 252
Page 253
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 253
Page 254
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 254
Page 255
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 255
Page 256
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 256
Page 257
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 257
Page 258
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 258
Page 259
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 259
Page 260
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 260
Page 261
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 261
Page 262
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 262
Page 263
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 263
Page 264
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 264
Page 265
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 265
Page 266
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 266
Page 267
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 267
Page 268
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 268
Page 269
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 269
Page 270
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 270
Page 271
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 271
Page 272
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 272
Page 273
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 273
Page 274
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 274
Page 275
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 275
Page 276
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 276
Page 277
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 277
Page 278
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 278
Page 279
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 279
Page 280
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 280
Page 281
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 281
Page 282
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 282
Page 283
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 283
Page 284
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 284
Page 285
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 285
Page 286
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 286
Page 287
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 287
Page 288
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 288
Page 289
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 289
Page 290
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 290
Page 291
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 291
Page 292
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 292
Page 293
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 293
Page 294
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 294
Page 295
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 295
Page 296
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 296
Page 297
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 297
Page 298
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 298
Page 299
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 299
Page 300
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 300
Page 301
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 301
Page 302
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 302
Page 303
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 303
Page 304
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 304
Page 305
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 305
Page 306
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 306
Page 307
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 307
Page 308
Suggested Citation:"Glossary." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27061.
×
Page 308

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

G-1  Glossary This glossary defines terms used throughout this guide. Term  Definitions  Action Area  Under Endangered Species Act Section 7 consultation, all areas to be  affected directly or indirectly by a federal action and not merely the  immediate area involved in the action. See also consultation.  adaptive management   Using the results of new information gathered through a monitoring  program to adjust management strategies and practices to help  provide for the conservation of species and their habitats.   alkaline soil  A type of soil with high amounts of calcium, sodium, and magnesium,  with a pH level above 7.  apiary  A place where honey bees are kept for commercial, hobby, or  educational purposes; a collection of honey beehives.  areas of high conservation value  Areas determined to have both high biological value and high  landscape intactness; prioritized for conservation actions.  biodiversity  The full array of living things considered at all levels, from genetic  variants of a single species to arrays of species and arrays of genera,  families, and higher taxonomic levels; includes natural communities  and ecosystems.  bivoltine  Having two generations (broods) per year.  boreal  Relating to or characteristic of the climate zone in the Northern  Hemisphere with a subarctic climate.  brood  The young that hatch from a group of eggs laid at the same time by  one mother.  Candidate Conservation  Agreement  Formal, voluntary agreements between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife  Service and one or more parties created to address the conservation  needs of one or more candidate species or species likely to become  candidates in the near future; can be entered into with states, local  governments, tribes, private property owners, and other entities.  Candidate Conservation  Agreement with Assurances  Addresses species proposed for listing or candidates for listing on non‐ federal land; results in an enhancement‐of‐survival permit, which  provides assurance to the applicant that if agreed‐upon conservation  actions for the covered species are implemented, the U.S. Fish and  Wildlife Service will not require additional conservation measures  beyond those in the agreement should the species be listed. See also  enhancement‐of‐survival permit.   candidate species  A species that has been found warranted for listing as threatened or  endangered under the Endangered Species Act, but whose listing is  precluded by higher priority species.  canopy  The aboveground portion of a plant cropping or crop, formed by the  collection of individual plant crowns; also refers to the upper layer or  habitat zone formed by maturing tree crowns.  carbon sequestration  A natural or artificial process by which carbon dioxide is removed from  the atmosphere, thereby stabilizing it in solid and dissolved forms to  prevent it from causing warming of the atmosphere.  chrysalis  The pupal stage of butterflies, covered by a hard exoskeleton, inside of  which they complete metamorphosis; typically found hanging from a  surface.  

Glossary  G-2  Term  Definitions  climate change  Long‐term shifts in temperatures and weather patterns, caused by  human activities such as burning of fossil fuels and deforestation.   climate change vulnerability  Refers to the degree to which an ecological system, natural  community, habitat, or individual species is likely to be adversely  affected as a result of changes in climate and is often dependent on  factors such as exposure, sensitivity, and adaptive capacity.  climate resiliency  The ability of species to adapt to and withstand changes in climate;  biodiversity assists species in persisting over time as climate changes.  cocoon  The pupal stage of moths (and some other holometabolous insects)  within which they complete metamorphosis; typically found hanging  from a surface or buried underground or in leaf litter.   colony  Large community of individual bees living together as one social unit;  typically includes workers, males, and a queen.   coloration  The colors, patterns, and general appearance used to identify species.  community  See natural community.  compensatory mitigation  Actions taken to fulfill, in whole or in part, mitigation requirements  under state or federal law or a court mandate.  congener  A member of the same taxonomic genus as another plant or animal.  conservation  The use of habitat and other natural resources in ways such that they  may remain viable for future generations. This includes permanent  protection of such resources.   conservation action/measure  An action that, when implemented, would protect or restore and  manage natural elements, including imperiled species and their  habitats, natural communities, ecological processes, and wildlife  corridors.   conservation bank  Permanently protected privately or publicly owned lands managed for  endangered, threatened, and other at‐risk species. May include habitat  restoration or creation in addition to protecting occupied habitats. See  mitigation bank.  conservation easement  A voluntary legal agreement between a landowner and a land trust or  government agency that permanently limits the uses of the land in  order to protect its conservation values.  conservation status  The current status of the species as either listed in, a candidate for  listing in, or petitioned for listing under the Endangered Species Act or  as imperiled without formal legal protection.   conservation strategy  Conservation actions or habitat enhancement actions that, if  implemented, will sustain and restore species and their habitats,  natural communities, biodiversity, habitat connectivity, ecosystem  functions, water resources, and other natural resources.  consultation  A process between the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service or National  Marine Fisheries Service and a federal agency or applicant that:  (1) determines whether a proposed federal action is likely to jeopardize the continued existence of listed species or destroy or adversely modify designated critical habitat; (2) begins with a federal agency’s written request and submittal of a complete initiation package; and (3) concludes with the issuance of a biological opinion and incidental take statement by either of the two agencies. corridor  Strips or patches of habitat that connect larger patches of habitat.

Glossary  G-3  Term  Definitions  creation (of natural community or  species’ habitat)   The creation of a specified resource condition where none existed  before. See establishment.   critical habitat  Habitat designated as critical1 refers to specific areas occupied by a  federally listed species at the time it is listed, and that are essential to  the conservation of the species and that may require special  management considerations or protection. Critical habitat also  includes specific areas outside occupied habitat into which the species  could spread and that are considered essential for recovery of the  species.  crop pest  Includes seed eaters, herbivores, frugivores, and pathogens (e.g.,  insects, fungi, bacteria, and viruses) that can result in reduced  agricultural productivity or total crop loss.  diapause  A physiological state of delay in development with reduced metabolic  rate, in response to regular and recurring unfavorable environmental  conditions; the time of the year and the stage of life when diapause  occurs in insects vary among species.  dimorphism  A trait that has two or more forms within a species (e.g., sizes or  coloration).  dispersal  In insects, the process of moving from the place their eggs were laid to  another location or population where they will settle and reproduce;  can occur in reaction to environmental conditions (weather and  habitat quality) and social factors (variations in population density and  sex ratio). Migration is a type of dispersal.  disturbance regime  The historic patterns (frequency and extent) of natural processes such  as fire, insects, wind, and mass movement that affect the ecosystems  and landscapes in a particular area.  diurnal  Active during the daytime.  diversity  See biodiversity.  dormant, dormancy  Having normal physical functions suspended or slowed down for a  period of time.  ecological resources  Species, habitats, biological resources, and natural resources identified  in a conservation strategy. See natural resources.  ecoregion  As used in this document, ecoregion means a U.S. Department of  Agriculture (USDA) Section.2 USDA describes four geographic levels of  detail in a hierarchy of regional ecosystems including domains,  divisions, provinces, and sections. Sections are subdivisions of  provinces based on major terrain features, such as a desert, plateau,  valley, mountain range, or a combination thereof.3  1 16 United States Code 1532(5)(a). 2 Goudey, C. B., and D. W. Smith, Eds. 1994. Ecoregions California07_3. McClellan, CA. Remote Sensing Lab. Updated with ECOMAP 2007: Cleland, D.T.; Freeouf, J. A.; Keys, J. E., Jr.; Nowacki, G. J.; Carpenter, C; McNab, W. H. 2007. Ecological Subregions: Sections and Subsections of the Conterminous United States [1:3,500,000] [CD-ROM]. Sloan, A. M., cartog. Gen. Tech. Report WO-76. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Miles and Goudey 1997. Ecological Subregions of California. Technical Report R5-EM-TP-005, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, San Francisco, CA. 3 Goudey, C. B., and D. W. Smith, Eds. 1994. Ecoregions California07_3. McClellan, CA. Remote Sensing Lab. Updated with ECOMAP 2007: Cleland, D.T.; Freeouf, J. A.; Keys, J. E., Jr.; Nowacki, G. J.; Carpenter, C; McNab, W. H. 2007. Ecological Subregions: Sections and Subsections of the Conterminous United States [1:3,500,000] [CD-ROM]. Sloan,

Glossary  G-4    Term  Definitions  ecosystem  A natural unit defined by both its living and nonliving components; a  balanced system of the exchange of nutrients and energy. See habitat.  ecosystem function  The ecosystem processes involving interactions among physical,  chemical, and biological components, such as dynamic river meander,  floodplain dynamism, tidal flux, bank erosion, and other processes  necessary to sustain the ecosystem and the species that depend on it.  ecosystem services  The beneficial outcomes to humans from ecosystem functions such as  supplying of oxygen; sequestering of carbon; moderating climate  change effects; supporting the food chain; harvesting of animals or  plants; providing clean water; recharging groundwater; abating storm,  fire, and flood damage; pollinating and fertilizing for agriculture; and  providing scenic views.  ecotone, ecotonal  A region of transition between two biological communities or habitats.  encroach, encroachment  The natural phenomenon characterized by the increase in density of  certain types of plants, bushes, or shrubs at the expense of the  herbaceous layer.   endangered  A species that has become so rare it is in danger of becoming extinct  throughout all or a significant portion of its range.  Endangered Species Act (ESA)  Federal law enacted in 1973 to prohibit the import, export, or taking of  fish, wildlife, and plants listed as threatened or endangered species;  provide for adding species to and removing them from the list of  threatened and endangered species and for preparing and  implementing plans for their recovery; provide for interagency  cooperation to avoid take of listed species and for issuing permits for  otherwise prohibited activities; provide for cooperation with state  governments, including authorization of financial assistance; and  implement the provisions of the Convention on International Trade in  Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna.  endemic  A species, subspecies, or variety found only in a specified geographic  region.  enhancement  A manipulation of an ecological resource or natural resource that  improves a specific ecosystem function. An enhancement does not  result in a gain in protected or conserved land, but it does result in an  improvement in ecological or ecosystem function.  enhancement‐of‐survival permit  Available under Section 10 of the ESA for entities whose activities will  provide a net conservation benefit to listed or candidate species.  erosion (of soil)  The natural process of denudation of the upper layer of soil (topsoil)  caused by water, ice, snow, air, plants, and animals; the process is  accelerated by conversion of natural vegetation to cropland or pasture.  establishment  The manipulation of the physical, chemical, or biological characteristics  present on a site to develop an aquatic or terrestrial habitat resource  for species. Establishment will result in a gain in resource area and/or  function. See creation.  extinction  The dying out or extermination of a kind of organism or a group of  kinds, usually a species.  A. M., Cartog. Gen. Tech. Report WO-76. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. Miles and Goudey 1997. Ecological Subregions of California. Technical Report R5-EM-TP-005, USDA Forest Service, Pacific Southwest Region, San Francisco, CA.

Glossary  G-5  Term  Definitions  extirpation  The situation in which a species or population no longer exists within a  certain geographic area, while at least one other population of the  species still persists in other areas; also known as local extinction.  eyespot  A rounded, eye‐like marking on the wing of a butterfly or moth.   federal nexus  When a project requires a federal authorization apart from ESA  compliance, license, or funding.  fire regime  The pattern, frequency, and intensity of the wildfires that prevail in an  area over long periods of time; an integral part of fire ecology and  renewal for certain types of ecosystems.  fire return interval  The average period between fires, both natural and prescribed, under  the historical fire regime.  flight time  The month or months of the year in which adult pollinators are  observed in flight.  focal species  In this guide, sensitive pollinators that are of particular conservation  concern, such as monarch butterflies or other imperiled species.   food web  The overall food relationships (food chains) among organisms in a  particular environment, detailing the interconnectivity in complex  feeding relationships for that ecosystem. All the food chains in a single  ecosystem represent the multiple possible paths that energy and  nutrients may take as they move through the ecosystem.  foraging territory  The distance or area over which an individual of a species is known to  travel to find food resources, as reported in agency reports or peer‐ reviewed literature for that species.  forb  An herbaceous flowering plant other than a grass, sedge, or rush.  forewing  The anterior (front, closer to the head) wing of an insect, attached to  the middle segment of the thorax.  fringe  Long, narrow scales at the outside edges of butterfly wings.  genetic variability  The tendency of individual genetic characteristics in a population to  vary from one another; greater genetic variability and diversity give  species a better chance of survival, as variability can be lost when  populations get smaller and more isolated, decreasing a species’ ability  to adapt.   graminoid  An herbaceous plant with a grass‐like structure, such as grasses,  rushes, and sedges; contrast with forbs, which have no grass‐like  features.  habitat  An ecological or environmental area that is, or may be, inhabited by a  species of animal, plant, or other type of organism. Habitat is also the  physical and biological environment that surrounds, influences, and is  used by a species’ population and is required to support its occupancy.  habitat assessment  A process whereby habitat conditions are rated as optimal,  suboptimal, marginal, or poor based upon descriptions and a rating  scale.  habitat connectivity  The capacity of habitat to facilitate the movement of species and  ecological functions. See also landscape connectivity. 

Glossary  G-6    Term  Definitions  habitat conservation plan (HCP)  A planning document that is required as part of an application for an  incidental take permit under the ESA. HCPs provide for partnerships  with non‐federal parties to conserve the ecosystems upon which listed  species depend, ultimately contributing to their recovery. HCPs  describe the anticipated effects of the proposed taking, how those  impacts will be minimized or mitigated, and how the HCP is to be  funded.  habitat degradation  When habitat conditions decline due to invasive species, pollution,  development, or overutilization of natural resources.  habitat enhancement  Actions that, when implemented, are intended to improve the quality  of wildlife habitat or to address risks or stressors to wildlife. Habitat  enhancement would have long‐term durability but would not involve  acquiring land or permanently protecting habitat.   habitat fragmentation  When larger habitats are broken up into smaller patches, which may  be too small to sustain populations of some species or species are  unable to move between patches.  habitat loss  When habitat is eliminated or transformed into another type of  habitat.  habitat needs/requirements  In this guide, conditions that must be present in order for pollinator  species to inhabit and thrive in their surroundings, including climate,  vegetation, associated species, and natural processes.  habitat quality  The capacity of a habitat to support a species. The precise meaning of  habitat quality varies by species and depends on the specific needs of a  species in the context of a particular area. High‐quality habitat for  species may have only foraging and resting elements or it may include  foraging, resting, and nesting elements. For other species, it may  encompass all elements needed for the species to complete its  lifecycle. Low‐quality habitat has only the minimal elements to support  occurrence of the species. High‐quality habitat tends to support larger  numbers of species than low‐quality habitat.  harass  As defined by the ESA, actions that create the likelihood of injury to  listed species to such an extent as to significantly disrupt normal  behavior patterns, which include, but are not limited to, breeding,  feeding, or sheltering.  harm  As defined by the ESA, includes significant habitat modification or  degradation that results in death or injury to listed species by  significantly impairing behavioral patterns, such as breeding, feeding,  or sheltering.  herbaceous  Vascular plants with little or no persistent woody stems above ground;  includes grasses and forbs.  herbicide  A substance that is toxic to plants, used to destroy unwanted  vegetation.  hindwing  The posterior (back) wing of an insect, attached to the last segment of  the thorax.  holometabolous  Describing insects with four life stages: egg, larva, pupa, and image (or  adult).  home range  The area in which an individual of a species lives and moves to meet its  needs such as feeding, foraging, breeding, and sheltering. 

Glossary  G-7  Term  Definitions  host plant  Plants upon which butterflies and moths lay their eggs, and upon  which their caterpillars (larvae) will feed after hatching.  hydrologic regime  The timing, volume, and duration of water flow events, which may be  influenced by the climate, soils, geology, groundwater, watershed land  cover, connectivity, and valley and stream morphology.  imperiled species  A species that is in decline and may be in danger of extinction. In this  guide, this term identifies species that are not legally protected under  the ESA.  incidental take permit  A permit issued under Section 10 of the ESA to private, non‐federal  entities undertaking otherwise lawful projects that might result in the  take of a listed species. See also take.  indicator species  A species whose presence, absence, or abundance reflects a particular  habitat, community, or set of environmental conditions.4  infiltration (of water)  The movement of water into the ground from the surface.  in‐lieu fee mitigation  A framework to create a mitigation strategy, giving entities the ability  to create and contribute to a fund as mitigation for unavoidable  impacts on listed species; money deposited into the fund is used to  improve upon the conservation effort for the species beyond what is  otherwise possible if funds were being restricted to a specific project  location or to a lesser mitigation type.  instar   The stage of the insect between molts, shedding the exoskeleton.  introduced species  An organism not native to the place or area but accidentally or  deliberately transported to the new location by human activity.  invasive species, nonnative  species   A nonnative species that can spread into the ecosystems and displace  native species, hybridize with native species, alter biological  communities, and alter ecosystem processes and that has the potential  to cause environmental or economic harm. According to the California  Invasive Plant Council, nonnative plants are species introduced to  California after European contact and as a direct or indirect result of  human activity.5  invertebrate  Lacking a backbone.  land conversion  The conversion of natural and agricultural land to other land uses  through the process of development.  land cover type  The dominant feature of the land surface defined by vegetation, water,  or human uses.   land preservation  Generally, the preservation of natural resources by acquiring land.  landscape connectivity  The extent to which the landscape facilitates or impedes movement  among habitat patches. See also habitat connectivity.  larva  The active immature form of a holometabolous insect in the stage  between egg and pupa.  life cycle  For all insect pollinators, includes four distinct life stages: egg, larva,  pupa, and adult, which may occur in different habitats.  4 Lincoln, R., G. Boxshall, and P. Clark. 1998. A Dictionary of Ecology, Evolution and Systematics. Second Edition. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK. 5 California Invasive Plant Council. 2022. “Definition of Invasive Plants.” Available: https://www.cal-ipc.org/plants/ impact/.

Glossary  G-8    Term  Definitions  listed species  Species currently listed as threatened or endangered under the ESA;  the species has been determined to be in danger of extinction in the  near or foreseeable future by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  managed bees  Bees that are bred and managed by people for commercial purposes.  For example, honey bees kept for honey production or rental for  commercial crop pollination; can harm other wild pollinators through  increased competition for nectar and pollen resources and spread of  disease.  mesic  Containing a moderate or well‐balanced supply of moisture.  microclimate  The atmospheric conditions of a very small or restricted area that  differ from those in the surrounding areas.  migration  The mass movement of individuals among areas, generally directional  and synchronized; see also dispersal.  mitigate, mitigation  To lessen the effects of an action, particularly adverse effects, on a  species or habitat.  mitigation bank  Land managed for its natural resource values, with an emphasis on  targeted resources. Typically requires the restoration or creation of  aquatic resources. See conservation bank.  monitoring   Data collected from repeated sampling to detect changes over time,  such as in response to revegetation or maintenance practices.  monitoring protocols  The methodology used to collect data. This guide contains protocols  for monitoring imperiled pollinators, imperiled species of pollinators,  and bumble bees.  monoculture  The cultivation of a single crop in a given area.  morphology  The form and structure of living organisms.  National Environmental Policy Act  (NEPA)  The national environmental law that promotes the enhancement of  the environment by requiring federal agencies to assess the  environmental effects of their proposed actions prior to making  decisions and to incorporate environmental considerations in their  planning and decision‐making through a systematic interdisciplinary  approach by preparing detailed statements assessing the  environmental impact of major federal actions significantly affecting  the environment.  native species  A species whose presence in a given region or ecosystem is the result  of only natural evolution and distribution.  natural community  A group of organisms living together and linked together by their  effects on one another and their responses to the environment they  share.6 A general term often used synonymously with habitat or  vegetation type.  natural resources  Biological and ecological resources including species and their habitats,  including waters of the state, waters of the United States, wetlands,  and natural communities.   6 Sawyer, J. O., T. Keeler-Wolf, and J. E. Evens. 2009. A Manual of California Vegetation. Second Edition. California Native Plant Society, Sacramento, CA.

Glossary  G-9  Term  Definitions  NatureServe  A non‐profit organization comprising a network of conservation  scientists that collects, aggregates, and standardizes data about the  status and distribution of species and ecosystems of conservation  concern in North America and assigns its own conservation rankings to  such species.  NEPA Assignment  The process by which some states (Alaska, Arizona, California, Florida,  Nebraska, Ohio, Texas, and Utah as of April 2022) assume federal  responsibility for transportation projects for the Federal Highway  Administration. States with NEPA Assignment may use the Section 7  ESA compliance process even when no other federal nexus exists.  nest  Places constructed and provisioned by bees and wasps in which their  offspring develop; can be on the ground, in soil, underground, in  tunnels, or in insulated cavities.  nocturnal  Active during the nighttime.  nonnative species  Any species introduced after European contact and as a direct or  indirect result of human activity to a new place or new habitat where it  did not previously occur.7 See invasive species.  noxious plant  A plant that can directly or indirectly injure or cause damage to crops,  livestock, poultry, or other interests of agriculture, irrigation,  navigation, the natural resources of the United States, the public  health, or the environment. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal  and Plant Health Inspection Service maintains a list of federally  recognized noxious weeds, and each state also has its own list.  objective, conservation objective  A concise, measurable statement of what is to be achieved and that  supports a conservation goal. The objective should be based on the  best available scientific information to conserve the species or other  conservation elements for which the conservation goal and objective is  developed.   obligate  Restricted to a particular condition of life, such as dependent on a  particular habitat or forage.  overwinter  The process by which some organisms pass through or wait out the  winter season, when conditions make normal activity or survival  difficult or near impossible.  oviposit, oviposition  To lay an egg or eggs.  parasite   An organism that lives in or on a host but does not kill the host.  parasitoid  An organism that lives on or inside a host and always kills the host.  pathogen  A bacterium, virus, or other microorganism that can cause disease.  perennial  Lasting or existing for a long time (in plants, more than 2 years);  enduring or continually recurring.  pesticide  A substance used for destroying insects, plants, or other organisms.  petitioned species  A species for which a petition to list the species as threatened or  endangered under the ESA has been received and is being evaluated  phasing/phased approach  Implementation of multiple conservation strategies in a systematic  approach to meet long‐term needs for ESA compliance and/or to cover  an expansive geographic area.  7 California Invasive Plant Council. 2022. “Definition of Invasive Plants.” Available: https://www.cal-ipc.org/plants/ impact/.

Glossary  G-10  Term  Definitions  phenology  The timing of cyclic and seasonal natural phenomenon, such as when  plants bloom and when insects emerge from pupal stages.  pollinator  An animal that helps carry pollen, either intentionally or accidentally,  from the male part of the flower (stamen) to the female part of the  same or another flower (stigma) to facilitate fertilization and  production of fruit, seeds, and young plants. Most flowers are  pollinated by insects and animals—such as bees, wasps, moths,  butterflies, birds, flies, and small mammals, including bats. Specialist  pollinators are more selective and visit flowers of one or very few plant  species.  population  The number of individuals of a particular taxon inhabiting a defined  geographic area.  population decline  The reduction in abundance of individuals of a species, often as a result  of human activity and climate change.  population density  The concentration of individuals within a species in a specific  geographic locale.  Prelisting Conservation  Agreement  Allows for the creation and banking of credits providing for the  conservation of non‐listed species. Anyone (e.g., federal agency or  private entity) who wants to participate in the process can undertake a  voluntary prelisting conservation action, earning credits to be carried  forward as long as the action occurs in a participating state within the  framework of an established conservation strategy for the species.  prescribed burning  The controlled application of fire by a team of fire experts under  specified weather conditions to restore health to ecosystems that  depend on fire.  programmatic  As opposed to a single defined project, indicating a suite of activities or  a program encompassing multiple areas or projects.  programmatic agreement  An agreement allowing for an individual compliance strategy to be  applied to a suite of projects or a program involving similar activities in  a particular geographic area.  protected area  Public or private lands managed for open space use.  pupa, pupate, pupation  In holometabolous insects, an insect in its immature form between  larva and adult; usually inactive; see also chrysalis and cocoon.   queen  In truly social insect species (e.g., honey bees, bumble bees, paper  wasps, ants), an adult female bee with fully developed reproductive  organs who is usually the mother of all of the bees in a particular hive  or colony and is responsible for laying the eggs. There is normally only  one adult, mated queen in a hive or colony.  range  See home range.  rangeland  Open country, usually grasslands, shrublands, woodlands, wetlands, or  deserts, grazed by domestic livestock or wild animals.  reclamation  The act or process of recovering, and/or the state of being recovered.  Many reclamation techniques can be used on the path to recovering or  restoring pre‐disturbance profiles. 

Glossary  G-11  Term  Definitions  recovery  The process by which the decline of an endangered or threatened  species is halted or reversed or threats to its survival are neutralized,  so that its long‐term survival in nature can be ensured.8 Recovery  entails actions to achieve the conservation and survival of a species,  including actions to prevent any further decline of a population’s  viability and genetic integrity. Recovery also includes actions to restore  or establish environmental conditions that enable a species to persist  (i.e., the long‐term occurrence of a species through the full range of  environmental variation).  recovery area  The band of low‐growing or routinely mowed vegetation directly  adjacent to the pavement or shoulder of a road where vehicles that  have left the roadway can recover; also known as the clear or safety  zone. The recovery area is free of obstruction and the width is  determined by the type of road and traffic volume, as well as the slope  of the embankment.  Recovery Crediting System  A tool that allows federal agencies to use their authorities to benefit  species already listed as threatened or endangered on non‐federal  lands; subject to consultation under Section 7 of the ESA. Creates a  process through which federal agencies create a “bank” of recovery  credits providing for the conservation of listed species while being able  to compensate for future impacts of their actions  refugia  Locations or areas providing a safe resting place for animals to hide  from predators.  restore, restoration  Manipulation of a piece of land with the goal of repairing natural or  historical ecosystem functions to degraded habitat or natural  resources. This results in an improvement in ecological or ecosystem  functions, but it does not result in a gain in area.  revegetation  The process of replanting and rebuilding the soil of disturbed lands  such as roadsides. This may be a natural process produced by plant  colonization and succession, human‐made rewilding projects, or  accelerated processes designed to repair damage to a landscape due  to construction or operational disturbance, wildfire, mining, flood, or  other cause.  riparian  Relating to wetlands adjacent to rivers and streams.  roadside  Areas along the sides of roads and highways extending across both  urban and rural landscapes; often the only natural vegetation that  remains in highly altered landscapes. Roadsides provide pollinators  with a place to find food, reproduce, and take shelter or overwinter,  and they can increase habitat connectivity.  roadside contamination  Deposit of pollutants through routine vehicle use and maintenance,  including vehicle exhaust, de‐icing materials, and heavy metals from  tire rubber, brake dust, and gasoline and diesel combustion products.  roadside management/ maintenance  The planning, design, construction, and maintenance of the non‐paved  highway right‐of‐way.  roadside restoration  See restoration, revegetation.  8 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service. 1998. Recovery Plan for Upland Species of the San Joaquin Valley, California. Portland, OR: Region 1.

Glossary  G-12  Term  Definitions  runoff (of water)  The draining away of water from the surface of an area of land; can be  problematic when it occurs as a result of excess rainwater,  stormwater, meltwater, or other water no longer infiltrating (soak) the  soil, especially due to increased impervious surfaces created through  extensive development.   senesce, senescence  To deteriorate with age because of the loss of a cell’s power to divide  and grow.  sensitive species  Any special‐status species identified by a state or federal agency.  sexual dimorphism  The condition where the sexes of the same species exhibit different  forms (e.g., sizes or color patterns).  solitary  Solitary bees do not live in a communal nest or hive. Females build  nests and provision their eggs on their own.  Species of Greatest Conservation  Need (SGCN)  SGCNs are selected, for each state, to indicate the status of biological  diversity in the state, specifying at‐risk species that have the greatest  need for conservation.   Species of Special Concern (SSC)  Species of Special Concern9 is an administrative designation and carries  no formal legal status. The intent of designating SSCs is to: (1) focus  attention on animals considered potentially at conservation risk by  state, local, and federal governmental entities, regulators, land  managers, planners, consulting biologists, and others; (2) stimulate  research on poorly known species; and (3) achieve conservation and  recovery of these animals before they meet criteria for listing as  threatened or endangered.  State Wildlife Action Plan (SWAP)  A comprehensive plan for conserving fish and wildlife across the  state.10   status  See conservation status.  stewardship  Land planning and ecological resources management with the goal of  protecting and enhancing ecosystems and biodiversity.  strategy  A plan of action or policy designed to achieve a major or overall aim.  succession  The process by which one habitat type is overtaken by another through  changing dominance of pioneer species, altering the ecosystem  dynamics. Early successional habitat contains vigorously growing  grasses, forbs, shrubs, and trees that provide excellent food and cover  for wildlife but need disturbance to be maintained.  survey  Sampling conducted to determine the presence or absence of a  particular imperiled pollinator species at a given site.  take  According to the ESA, any action to “harass, harm pursue, hunt, shoot,  wound, kill, trap, capture, or collect, or to attempt to engage in any  such conduct.” Incidental take is take of listed species that results  from, but is not the purpose of, carrying out an otherwise lawful  activity conducted by a federal agency or applicant.  thorax  The section of an insect body that follows the head and is before the  abdomen; this section bears six legs and wings.  9 https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/SSC. 10 California Department of Fish and Wildlife. 2017. SWAP Final 2015 Document. Available: https://www.wildlife.ca.gov/SWAP/Final.

Glossary  G-13  Term  Definitions  threat  An anthropogenic (human‐induced) or natural driver that could result  in changing the ecological conditions of the species or its habitat in a  negative way.   threatened  Plants and animals that are likely to become endangered within the  foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their  ranges.  transportation planning  The process of identifying transportation needs and establishing plans  for infrastructure development to meet those needs; occurs at the  local, regional, and state levels and generally includes identifying and  prioritizing projects needed to maintain and improve transportation  networks and achieve specific transportation goals. Can involve either  short‐ (e.g., 4 years) or long‐range (e.g., 20+ years) time frames.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service  (USFWS)  The federal agency responsible for conserving, protecting, and  enhancing fish, wildlife, and plants and their habitats; administers the  ESA with NMFS.  univoltine  Having one generation per year.  vegetation management  The targeted control and elimination of unwanted vegetation and  replacement with desirable vegetation.  ventral  Of, on, or relating to the underside of an animal or plant (abdominal).  worker  In truly social bees (e.g., bumble bees), non‐reproducing females that  collect food for other bees in the colony.  working land  An area where people live and work in a way that allows ecosystems or  ecosystem functions to be sustained (e.g., farms, ranches). Human  activities are done in a way that minimizes disturbance on native  plants and animals while still retaining the working nature of the  landscape.  

R-1 References and Other Resources Ahern,  J.,  C. A. Niedner,  and A. Barker.  1992.  Roadside Wildflower Meadows:  Summary  of  Benefits  and  Guidelines  to  Successful  Establishment  and  Management.  Transportation  Research  Record,  No.  1334:46–53.  Alcock,  J., L. P. Brower, and E. H. Williams,  Jr. 2016. “Monarch butterflies use regenerating milkweeds  for  reproduction  in  mowed  hayfields  in  northern  Virginia.”  The  Journal  of  the  Lepidopterists'  Society  70(3):177–181.  Allen‐Wardell, G., P. Bernhardt, R. Bitner, A. Burquez, S. Buchmann, J. Cane, P. A. Cox, V. Dalton, P. Feinsinger,  M. Ingram, and D. Inouye. 1998. “The potential consequences of pollinator declines on the conservation of biodiversity and stability of food crop yields.” Conservation Biology 12(1):8–17. Altizer, S. M., and K. S. Oberhauser. 1999. “Effects of the protozoan parasite Ophryocystis elektroscirrha on  the fitness of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).” Journal of Invertebrate Pathology 74(1):76–88.  Ament, R., J. Begley, S. Powell, and P. Stoy. 2014. Roadside Vegetation and Soils on Federal Lands‐Evaluation  of the Potential for Increasing Carbon Capture and Storage and Decreasing Carbon Emissions. Report for  the  Federal  Highway  Administration,  #  DTFH68‐07‐E‐00045.  Available:  https://westerntransportationinstitute.org/wp‐content/uploads/2016/08/4W3748_Final_Report.pdf.   American  Association  of  State  Highway  and  Transportation  Officials  (AASHTO).  2011.  Federal  Highway  Association: Guide to Roadside Vegetation Management.   Andrew, G., G. Glenn, P. Jacoby‐Garrett, and D. Thompson. 2013. Surveys and habitat assessment for Plebejus  shasta charlestonensis (Mount Charleston Blue Butterfly) in the Spring Mountain Range of Nevada (2012  field season). U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Southern Nevada Field Office, Las Vegas Nevada. 104 pp.  Araratyan,  L.  A.,  and  S.  A.  Zakharyan.  1988.  “On  the  contamination  of  snow  along  main  highways.”  Biologicheskii Zhurnal Armenii 41:514–519.  Arizona Department of Transportation (ADOT) 2020. Implementing FHWA’s INVEST Round 3 Project and 3rd  Annual Arizona Department of Transportation Sustainable Transportation Program Final Report.  Audubon  California.  1998.  “San  Emigdio  Blue  Butterfly  –  Plebejus  emigdionis.”  Available:  http://www.kern.audubon.org/SEBLUE.htm.  Austin, G. T. 1998. Callophrys (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae) in Nevada, with description of a new subspecies of  C. comstocki. In: Emmel, T. C. ed. Systematics of western North American butterflies. The Mariposa Press, Gainesville, FL. Austin, G. T., and P. J. Leary. 2008. “Larval host plants of butterflies in Nevada.” Holarctic Lepidoptera 12(1‐ 2):1–150.  Austin, G. T., B. M. Boyd, and D. D. Murphy. 2008. “Euphilotes ancilla (Lycaenidae) in the Spring Mountains,  Nevada: more than one species.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 62:148–160.  Balch,  J. K., B. A. Bradley, C. M. D’Antonio, and  J. Gómez‐Dans. 2012. “Introduced annual grass  increases  regional fire activity across the arid western USA (1980–2009).” Global Change Biology 19(1):173–183. 

References and Other Resources  R-2 Barnum, S. A., and G. Alt. 2013. The Effect of Reduced Roadside Mowing on Rate of Deer‐Vehicle Collisions.  Transportation Research Board 92nd Annual Meeting Compendium of Papers.  Baron, G. L., N. E. Raine, and M. J. Brown. 2014. “Impact of chronic exposure to a pyrethroid pesticide on  bumblebees and interactions with a trypanosome parasite.” Journal of Applied Ecology 51(2):460–469.  Bartel, R. A., N. M. Haddad, and J. P. Wright. 2010. “Ecosystem Engineers Maintain a Rare Species of Butterfly  and Increase Plant Diversity.” Oikos 119:883–890.  Battisti, L., M. Potrich, A. R. Sampaio, N. de Castilhos Ghisi, F. M. Costa‐Maia, R. Abati, C. B. Dos Reis Martinez,  and S. H. Sofia. 2021.  Is glyphosate  toxic  to bees? A meta‐analytical  review. The Science of  the Total  Environment 767:145397.  Baum,  K.  A.,  and  E.  K. Mueller.  2015.  Grassland  and  roadside management  practices  affect milkweed  abundance and opportunities for monarch recruitment. In: Monarchs in a Changing World: Biology and  Conservation of an Iconic Butterfly, pp. 197–202. Cornell University Press, Ithaca, NY.  Baxter‐Gilbert, J. H., J. L. Riley, C. J. Neufeld, J. D. Litzgus, and D. Lesbarrères. 2015. “Road mortality potentially  responsible for billions of pollinating insect deaths annually.” Journal of Insect Conservation 19(5):1029– 1035.  Bedsworth, L., D. Cayan, G. Franco, L. Fisher, and S. Ziaja. 2018. Statewide Summary Report. California’s Fourth  Climate Change Assessment.  Belitz, M. W., L. K. Hendrick, M. J. Monfils, D. L. Cuthrell, C. J. Marshall, A. Y. Kawahara, N. S. Cobb, J. M. Zaspel,  A. M. Horton, S. L. Huber, A. D. Warren, G. A. Forthaus, and A. K. Monfils. 2018. “Aggregated occurrence  records  of  the  federally  endangered  Poweshiek  skipperling  (Oarisma  poweshiek).” Biodiversity Data  Journal 6: e29081.  Belitz, M. W., M. J. Monfils, D. L. Cuthrell, and A. K. Monfils. 2019. “Life history and ecology of the endangered  Poweshiek  skipperling Oarisma  poweshiek  in Michigan  prairie  fens.”  Journal  of  Insect  Conservation  23:635–649.  Belitz, M. W., M. J. Monfils, D. L. Cuthrell, and A. K. Monfils. 2020. “Landscape‐level environmental stressors  contributing  to  the decline of Poweshiek  skipperling  (Oarisma poweshiek).”  Insect  conservation and  diversity / Royal Entomological Society of London 13:187–200.  Bennett, V. J., M. G. Betts, and W. P. Smith. 2014. “Influence of thermal conditions on habitat use by a rare  spring‐emerging  butterfly  Euphydryas  editha  taylori.”  Journal  of  applied  entomology  (Zeitschrift  fur  angewandte Entomologie) 138:623–634.  Berger,  R.  L.  2005.  NCHRP  Synthesis  341:  Integrated  Roadside  Vegetation Management.  Transportation  Research Board of the National Academies, Washington, DC.  Beyer,  L., and  S. H. Black. 2007.  Site utilization by adults and  larvae of mardon  skipper butterfly  (Polites  mardon) at four sites in Washington and Oregon. Final report to the Forest Service and BLM. 72 pp.  Bierzychudek, P., and K. Warner. 2015. “Modeling caterpillar movement to guide habitat enhancement for  Speyeria zerene hippolyta, the Oregon silverspot butterfly.” Journal of Insect Conservation 19:45–54.  Billings, C. H. 1990. “Wildflowers: Municipal field reports.” Public Works 121(3):106. 

References and Other Resources  R-3 Black, S. H. 2012. “Insect conservation and the endangered species act: A history.”  In  Insect Conservation:  Past, Present and Prospects (pp. 171–189). Springer, Dordrecht.  Black, S. H., and D. M. Vaughan. 2005. Species Profile: Euphilotes battoides allyni. In Shepherd, M. D., D. M.  Vaughan, and S. H. Black (Eds). Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May  2005). The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Black,  S. H., M.  Shepherd,  and M. Vaughan. 2011.  “Rangeland management  for pollinators.” Rangelands  33(3):9–13.  Blackburn,  T.  1882.  “Descriptions  of  the  larvae  of  Hawaiian  Lepidoptera.”  The  Entomologist’s Monthly  Magazine 19:55–56.  Blumenthal, D. M., N. R. Jordan, and E. L. Svenson. 2005. “Effects of prairie restoration on weed invasions.”  Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment 107:221–230.  Bogemams, J., L. Nicrinck, and J. M. Stassart. 1989. “Effect of deicing chloride salts on  ion accumulation  in  spruce (Picea abies (L.) sp.).” Plant and Soil 113:3–11.  Bohnenblust, E. W., A. D. Vaudo, J. F. Egan, D. A. Mortensen, and J. F. Tooker. 2016. “Effects of the herbicide  dicamba  on  nontarget  plants  and  pollinator  visitation.”  Environmental  Toxicology  and  Chemistry  35(1):144–151.  Bohnenblust, E., J. F. Egan, D. Mortensen, and J. Tooker. 2013. “Direct and indirect effects of the synthetic‐ auxin herbicide dicamba on two lepidopteran species.” Environmental Entomology 42(3):586–594.  Bonebrake, T. C., C. L. Boggs, J. M. McNally, J. Ranganathan, and P. R. Ehrlich. 2010. “Oviposition behavior and  offspring  performance  in  herbivorous  insects:  consequences  of  climatic  and  habitat  heterogeneity.”  Oikos 119:927–934.  Bonebrake, T. C., R. T. Navratil, C. L. Boggs, S. Fendorf, C. B. Field, and P. R. Ehrlich. 2011. “Native and Non‐ Native  Community  Assembly  through  Edaphic Manipulation:  Implications  for  Habitat  Creation  and  Restoration.” Restoration Ecology 19:709–716.   Borror, D. J., R. E. White, and R. T. Peterson. 1970. A Field Guide to Insects: America North of Mexico (Vol. 19).  Houghton Mifflin Harcourt.  Boutin, C., B. Strandberg, D. Carpenter, S. K. Mathiassen, and P. J. Thomas. 2014. “Herbicide impact on non‐ target  plant  reproduction:  what  are  the  toxicological  and  ecological  implications?”  Environmental  Pollution 185:295–306.  Bowers, M. D., and E. H. Williams. 1995. “Variable chemical defence in the checkerspot butterfly Euphydryas  gillettii (Lepidoptera: NymphaIidae).” Ecological Entomology 20:208–212.  Brandt, J., K. Henderson, and J. Uthe. 2011. Integrated Roadside Vegetation Management Technical Manual.  Available: http://www.uni.edu/irvm.  Brittain, C., C. Kremen, and A. M. Klein. 2013. “Biodiversity buffers pollination from changes in environmental  conditions.” Global Change Biology 19(2):540–547.  Brittain, C., N. Williams, C. Kremen, and A.‐M. Klein. 2013. “Synergistic effects of non‐Apis bees and honey  bees for pollination services.” Proceedings. Biological Sciences / The Royal Society 280:20122767. 

References and Other Resources  R-4 Britten, H. B., and J. W. Glasford. 2002. “Genetic population structure of the Dakota skipper (Lepidoptera:  Hesperia dacotae): A North American native prairie obligate.” Conservation Genetics 3:363–374.  Britton, H., and L. Riley. 1994. “Nectar source diversity as an indicator of habitat suitability for the endangered  Uncompahgre fritillary Boloria acrocnema Nymphalidae.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 48:173– 179.  Brock, J. P., and K. Kaufman. 2003. Kaufman Field Guide to Butterflies of North America. Houghton Mifflin  Company, New York. 392 pp.  Brown, D. L.,  J. Laird, W. Sommers, and A. Hamilton. 1999. “Methods used by the Arizona Department of  Transportation to reduce wildlife mortality and improve highway safety.” In International Conference of  Wildlife Ecology and Transportation, Florida.  Brown,  J.  J.  1987.  “Toxicity  of  herbicides  thiobencarb  and  endothall  when  fed  to  laboratory‐reared  Trichoplusia ni (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).” Pesticide Biochemistry and Physiology 27:97–100.  Brown, R. N. and C. D. Sawyer. 2012. “Plant species diversity of highway roadsides in southern New England.”  Northeastern Naturalist 19(1):25–42.  Brunzel, S., H. Elligsen, and R. Frankl. 2004. “Distribution of the Cinnabar moth Tyria jacobaeae L. at landscape  scale: use of linear landscape structures in egg laying on larval host plant exposures.” Landscape Ecology  19(1):21–27.  Buckingham, D. A., M. Linders, C. Landa, L. Mullen, and C. LeRoy. 2016. “Oviposition Preference of Endangered  Taylor’s  Checkerspot  Butterflies  (Euphydryas  editha  taylori)  Using  Native  and  Non‐Native  Hosts.”  Northwest science: official publication of the Northwest Scientific Association 90:491–497.  Buehler, D. M., D. R. Norris, B. J. Stutchbury, and N. C. Kopysh. 2002. “Food supply and parental feeding rates  of Hooded Warblers in forest fragments.” The Wilson Journal of Ornithology 114(1):122–127.  Bugg, R. L., C. S. Brown, and J. H. Anderson. 1997. “Restoring native perennial grasses to rural roadsides in the  Sacramento Valley of California: Establishment and evaluation.” Restoration Ecology 5:214–228.  Bureau of Land Management. 2019. OR‐IM‐2019‐003 Transmittal of State Director Special Status Species List,  with attachments. Available: http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/sfpnw/issssp/agency‐policy/. Accessed: August 7,  2020.  Burghardt, K.  T., D. W.  Tallamy,  and W. G.  Shriver.  2009.  “Impact of native plants on bird  and butterfly  biodiversity in suburban landscapes.” Conservation Biology 23:219–224.  Burghardt, K. T., D. W. Tallamy, C. Philips, and K. J. Shropshire. 2010. “Non‐native plants reduce abundance,  richness, and host specialization in lepidopteran communities.” Ecosphere 1(5):1–22.  Burkle, L. A., and  J. B. Runyon. 2016. Drought and  leaf Herbivory  Influence Floral Volatiles and Pollinator  Attraction. Global Change Biology 22:1644–1654.  Cackowsky,  J.‐M.,  and  J.  L.  Nasar.  2003.  “Restorative  effects  of  roadside  vegetation:  implications  for  automobile driver anger and frustration.” Environment and Behavior 35(6):736–751.  Calderone, N. W. 2012.  “Insect Pollinated Crops,  Insect Pollinators  and US Agriculture: Trend Analysis of  Aggregate Data for the Period 1992–2009.” PLOS ONE 7:e37235. 

References and Other Resources  R-5 Calhoun, J. V. 1995. “The biogeography and ecology of Euphyes dukesi (Hesperiidae)  in Florida.” Journal of  the Lepidopterists’ Society. 29(1):6–23.  California Department of Transportation (Caltrans). 2019. Caltrans Advance Mitigation Program Final Formal  Guidelines, Version 1.0. October. 52 pp.  Camarretta, N., P. A. Harrison, T. Bailey, N. Davidson, A. Lucieer, M. Hunt, and B. M. Potts. 2020. Stability of  Species  and  Provenance  Performance  when  Translocated  into  Different  Community  Assemblages.  Restoration Ecology 28:447–458.  Cambell,  C.  L.,  and  L. M.  Ishii.  1993.  “Larval  host  plant  testing  of  Tinostoma  smaragditis  (Lepidoptera:  Sphingidae), the Fabulous Green Sphinx of Kauai.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society  32:83–90.  Cameron, S. A., J. D. Lozier, J. P. Strange, J. B. Koch, N. Cordes, L. F. Solter, and T. L. Griswold. 2011. Patterns  of Widespread Decline in North American Bumble Bees. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences  108(2):662–667.  Campioni, L., Marengo, I., Román, J. and D’Amico, M., 2022. Mud‐puddling on roadsides: a potential ecological  trap for butterflies. Journal of Insect Conservation, 26(1), pp.131‐134.  Cane, J. H. 1991. “Soils of ground‐nesting bees (Hymenoptera: Apoidea): texture, moisture, cell depth and  climate.” Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 64(4):406–413.  Cane, J. H. 1997. “Violent weather and bees: populations of the Barrier Island endemic, Hesperapis oraria.”  Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 70:73–75.  Cane,  J. H.,  and V.  J.  Tepedino.  2017.  “Gauging  the  effect  of  honey  bee  pollen  collection  on  native  bee  communities.” Conservation Letters 10(2):205–210.  Cane, J. H., R. R. Snelling, and L. J. Kervin. 1996. “A new monolectic coastal bee, Hesperapis oraria Snelling  and  Stage  (Hymenoptera: Melittidae),  with  a  review  of  desert  and  neotropical  disjunctives  in  the  Southeastern U.S.” Journal of the Kansas Entomological Society 69:238–247.  Cape, J. N., Y. S. Tang, N. Van Dijk, L. Love, M. A. Sutton, and S. C. F. Palmer. 2004. “Concentrations of ammonia  and nitrogen dioxide at roadside verges, and their contribution to nitrogen deposition.” Environmental  Pollution 132(3):469–478.  Cariveau, D., E. Evans, and M. Boone. 2019. Monitoring and habitat assessment of declining bumble bees in  roadsides in the Twin Cities metro area of Minnesota. Minnesota Department of Transportation.  Carroll, S. P., and J. Loye. 2006. “Invasion, Colonization, and Disturbance; Historical Ecology of the Endangered  Miami Blue Butterfly.” Journal of Insect Conservation 10:13–27.  Carvell, C. 2002.  “Habitat use and  conservation of bumble bees  (Bombus  spp.) under different grassland  management regimes.” Biological Conservation 103:33–49.  Cayan, D. R., E. P. Maurer, M. D. Dettinger, M. Tyree, and K. Hayhoe. 2008. “Climate Change Scenarios for the  California Region.” Climatic Change 87:21–42.  Cayton,  H.  L.,  and  N. M.  Haddad.  2018.  “Water  Availability  Coincides  with  Population  Declines  for  an  Endangered Butterfly.” Diversity 10:94. 

References and Other Resources  R-6 Center  for Biological Diversity. 2010. Petition  to  list 404 aquatic,  riparian and wetlands  species  from  the  Southeastern United States as threatened or endangered under the Endangered Species Act.  Center  for Biological Diversity.  2018.  Petition  to  list  the Mojave  poppy  bee  (Perdita meconis)  under  the  Endangered Species Act and concurrently designate critical habitat.  Center for Biological Diversity. 2019. Petition to list the Gulf Coast solitary bee (Hesperapis oraria) under the  Endangered Species Act and concurrently designate critical habitat.  Chan, P. K., and L. Packer. 2006. “Assessment of potential karner blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis)  (Family: Lycanidae) reintroduction sites in Ontario, Canada.” Restoration Ecology 14:645–652.  Chen, S., W. Wang, W. Xu, Y. Wang, H. Wan, D. Chen, Z. Tang, X. Tang, G. Zhou, Z. Xie, D. Zhou, Z. Shangguan,  J. Huang, J.‐S. He, Y. Wang, J. Sheng, L. Tang, X. Li, M. Dong, Y. Wu, Q. Wang, Z. Wang, J. Wu, F. S. Chapin  III, and Y. Bai. 2018. Plant Diversity Enhances Productivity and Soil Carbon Storage. Proceedings of the  National Academy of Sciences, 115(16):4027–4032.  Clayborn,  J.  T.  2017.  Top‐down  and  bottom‐up  approaches  to  understanding  the  fate  of  the  federally  endangered  Schaus’  swallowtail  butterfly  (Heraclides  aristodemus  ponceanus).  Ph.D.,  Florida  International University.  Clayborn, J., and S. Koptur. 2017. “Mortal combat between ants and caterpillars: an ominous threat to the  endangered Schaus swallowtail butterfly (Heraclides aristodemus ponceanus) in the Florida Keys, USA.”  Journal of Insect Conservation 21:689–702.  Clayborn, J., S. Koptur, G. O’Brien, and K. R. T. Whelan. 2017. “The Schaus swallowtail habitat enhancement  project: An  applied  service‐learning project  continuum  from Biscayne National Park  to Miami–Dade  County public schools.” Southeastern Naturalist 16:26–46.  Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). 2003. COSEWIC assessment and status  report on the sand‐verbena moth Copablepharon fuscum in Canada. Ottawa. Vii+39 pp.   Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC). 2014. COSEWIC Annual Report: 2013– 2014.  Ottawa.  44  pp.  Available:  https://wildlife‐species.canada.ca/species‐risk‐registry/virtual_sara/ files/cosewic/CESCC_1014_e.pdf. Accessed: September 16, 2020.  Conserve Wildlife Foundation of New  Jersey. 2022. New  Jersey Endangered and Threatened Species Field  Guide.  Available:  http://www.conservewildlifenj.org/species/fieldguide/view/ Atrytone%20arogos%20arogos/. Accessed: October 4, 2020.  Cramer, C. 1991.  “Tougher  than weeds: native prairie plants, better management  trim  roadside  spraying  90%.” The New Farm 13:37–39.  Croxton, P.  J.,  J. P. Hann,  J. N. Greatorex‐Davis, and T. H.  Sparks. 2005.  “Linear hotspots? The  floral and  butterfly diversity of green lanes.” Biological Conservation 121:579–584.  Cuddihy,  L. W.,  and C. P.  Stone.  1990. Alteration of native Hawaiian  vegetation‐effects of humans,  their  activities and introductions. University of Hawaii Cooperative National Park Studies Unit, University of  Hawaii Press, Honolulu, Hawaii. 138 pp.  Dale, J. M., and B. Freedman. 1982. “Lead and zinc contamination of roadside soil and vegetation in Halifax,  Nova Scotia.” Proceedings of the Nova Scotian Institute of Science 32:327–336. 

References and Other Resources  R-7 Daly, H. V., and K. N. Magnacca. 2003.  Insects of Hawaii. Vol. 17. Hawaiian Hylaeus  (Nesoprosopis) Bees  (Hymenoptera: Apoidea). University of Hawai‘i Press, Honolulu. 234 pp.  Dana, M. N., R. D. Kemery, and B. S. Boszor. 1996. Wildflowers for Indiana’s Highways. Purdue University Joint  Highway Research Project, Project No: C‐36‐48N, File No: 9‐5‐14.  Dana, R. P. 1991. Conservation Management of the Prairie Skippers Hesperia Dacotae and Hesperia Ottoe.  Station Bulletin 594–1991 (AD–SB‐5511‐S). University of Minnesota, Minnesota Agricultural Experiment  Station.  Available:  https://conservancy.umn.edu/bitstream/handle/11299/139544/ SB594.pdf?sequence=1&isAllowed=y. Accessed: September 2020.  Dániel‐Ferreira, J., Berggren, Å., Wissman, J. and Öckinger, E. 2022a. “Road verges are corridors and roads  barriers for the movement of flower‐visiting insects.” Ecography, 2022(2).  Dániel‐Ferreira,  J.,  Berggren, Å., Bommarco, R., Wissman,  J.  and Öckinger,  E.  2022b.  “Bumblebee  queen  mortality along roads increase with traffic.” Biological Conservation 272:109643.  Daniels,  J. C. 2011. Schaus Swallowtail, Heraclides aristodemus ponceanus  (Schaus)  (Insecta: Lepidoptera:  Papilionidae). University of Florida/IFAS Extension. Document EENY‐387.  Davis, H. K., D. L. Miller, and M. Thetford. 2020. “Habitat suitability of an at‐risk, monolectic, ground‐nesting  bee Hesperapis oraria and its floral host Balduina angustifolia at two spatial scales along the Northern  Gulf of Mexico.” Journal of insect Conservation 24:561–573.  Dearborn,  K.,  and  R. Westwood.  2014.  “Predicting  adult  emergence  of  Dakota  skipper  and  Poweshiek  skipperling (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) in Canada.” Journal of Insect Conservation 18:875–884.  Debinski, D. M. 1994. Genetic diversity assessment in a metapopulation of the butterfly Euphydryas gillettii.  Defenders of Wildlife. 2015. Petition to list the blue calamintha bee (Osmia calaminthae) as an endangered,  or alternatively as a threatened, species pursuant to the Endangered Species Act and for the designation  of critical habitat for this species.  Dickson, T. L., and W. H. Busby. 2009. “Forb species establishment  increases with decreased grass seeding  density  and  increased  forb  seeding  density  in  a  northeast  Kansas,  U.S.A.,  experimental  prairie  restoration.” Restoration Ecology 17:597–605.  Dilts, T. E., M. O. Steele, J. D. Engler, E. M. Pelton, S. J. Jepsen, S. J. McKnight, A. R. Taylor, C. E. Fallon, S. H.  Black,  E.  E. Cruz, D. R. Craver,  and M.  L.  Forister.  2019.  “Host Plants  and Climate  Structure Habitat  Associations of the Western Monarch Butterfly.” Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 7:188.  Dirig, R., and J. F. Cryan. 1991. “The status of silvery blue subspecies (Glaucopsyche lygdamus lygdamus and  G. l. couperi: Lycaenidae) in New York.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 45(4):272–290.  Dixon, L., P. Sorensen, M. Wachs, M. T. Collins, M. A. Hanson, A. Kofner, T. Light, M. Madsen, L. Marsh, A.  Overton, H. J. Shatz, and B. A. Weatherford. 2008. Costs, Revenues, and Benefits of the Western Riverside  County Multiple Species Habitat Conservation Plan. Prepared by Rand Corporation.  Dover, J., N. Sotherton, and K. A. Y. Gobbett. 1990. “Reduced pesticide  inputs on cereal field margins: the  effects on butterfly abundance.” Ecological Entomology 15(1):17–24.  Eaton, E. R., and K. Kaufman. 2007. Kaufman Field Guide to Insects of North America. 392 pp. New York, NY:  HarperCollins Publishers. 

References and Other Resources  R-8 Ehrlich, P. R., and I. Hanski, eds. 2004. On the wings of checkerspots: a model system for population biology.  Oxford University Press.   Eilers,  E.  J., C. Kremen,  S.  S. Greenleaf, A. K. Garber,  and A. M. Klein.  2011.  “Contribution of pollinator‐ mediated crops to nutrients in the human food supply.” PLOS ONE 6(6):e21363.  Elkington, J. 2018. “25 Years Ago I Coined the Phrase ‘Triple Bottom Line.’ Here’s Why It’s Time to Rethink It.”  Harvard Business Review Online. Available: https://hbr.org/2018/06/25‐years‐ago‐i‐coined‐the‐phrase‐ triple‐bottom‐line‐heres‐why‐im‐giving‐up‐on‐it.   Elliott, C. H. 2019. The Riddle of the Sphinx: Population ecology of the endangered Blackburn’s sphinx moth,  Manduca  blackburni  (Lepidoptera:  Sphingidae)  on  an  invasive  host  plant.  Doctoral  dissertation,  University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa. 60 pp.  Elliott, R. H., D. Cmiralova, and W. G. Wellington, 1979. “Olfactory Repellency of Herbicides to Foraging Honey  Bees (Hymenoptera: Apidae).” The Canadian Entomologist 111(10):1131–1135.  Elzinga, C. L., and D. W. Salzer. 1998. Measuring & Monitoring Plant Populations. U.S. Department of  the  Interior, Bureau of Land Management.  Engel, M.  S.,  I. Hinojosa,  and A. P. Rasnitsyn. 2009.  “A honey bee  from  the Miocene of Nevada  and  the  biogeography of Apis (Hymenoptera: Apidae; Apini).” Proceedings of the California Academy of Sciences  60 (3):23–38.   Entsminger, E. D., J. C. Jones, J. W. Guyton, B. K. Strickland, and B. D. Leopold. 2017. “Evaluation of mowing  frequency on right‐of‐way plant communities in Mississippi.” Journal of Fish and Wildlife Management  8(1):125–139.  Espeset, A. E., J. G. Harrison, A. M. Shapiro, C. C. Nice, J. H. Thorne, D. P. Waetjen, J. A. Fordyce, and M. L.  Forister.  2016.  “Understanding  a  migratory  species  in  a  changing  world:  climatic  effects  and  demographic  declines  in  the western monarch  revealed  by  four  decades  of  intensive monitoring.”  Oecologia 181(3):819–830.  Essig  Museum  of  Entomology.  2022.  “Valley  Elderberry  Longhorn  Beetle.”  Available:  https://essig.berkeley.edu/endangered/endangered_desmcali/.   European Food Safety Authority  (EFSA). 2005. “Conclusion  regarding  the peer  review of  the pesticide  risk  assessment  of  the  active  substance  clopyralid.”  EFSA  Journal  50:1–65.  Available:  https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2006.50r.  European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). 2009. “Conclusion on the Conclusion regarding the peer review of  the pesticide  risk  assessment of  the  active  substance picloram.” EFSA  Journal 7(12):1390. Available:  https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/epdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2009.1390.  European Food Safety Authority (EFSA). 2015. “Conclusion on the Conclusion regarding the peer review of  the  pesticide  risk  assessment  of  the  active  substance  pyraflufen‐ethyl.”  EFSA  Journal  13(2):4001.  Available: https://efsa.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/pdf/10.2903/j.efsa.2015.4001.  Evans, E., M. Boone, and D. Cariveau. 2019. Monitoring and Habitat Assessment of Declining Bumble Bees in  Roadsides  in  the  Twin  Cities Metro Area  of Minnesota.  Research Report, Minnesota Department  of  Transportation.  Report  # MN/RC  2019‐25.  Available:  http://www.dot.state.mn.us/research/reports/ 2019/201925.pdf. 

References and Other Resources  R-9 Falk, A. D., T. E. Fulbright, F. S. Smith, L. A. Brennan, A. J. Ortega‐Santos, and S. Benn. 2013. “Does Seeding a  Locally Adapted Native Mixture Inhibit Ingress by Exotic Plants?” Restoration Ecology 21(4):474–480.  Fargione, J. E., S. Bassett, T. Boucher, S. D. Bridgham, R. T. Conant, S. C. Cook‐Patton, P. W. Ellis, A. Falcucci, J.  W. Fourqurean, T. Gopalakrishna, H. Gu, B. Henderson, M. D. Hurteau, K. D. Kroeger, T. Kroeger, T. J. Lark, S. M. Leavitt, G. Lomax, R. I. McDonald, J. P. Megonigal, D. A. Miteva, C. J. Richardson, J. Sanderman, D. Shoch, S. A. Spawn, J. W. Veldman, C. A. Williams, P. B. Woodbury, C. Zganjar, M. Baranski, P. Elias, R. A. Houghton, E.  Landis, E. McGlynn, W. H. Schlesinger,  J. V. Siikamaki, A. E. Sutton‐Grier, and B. W. Griscom. 2018. “Natural climate solutions for the United States.” Science Advances 4:eaat1869. Faulkner, D., and M. Klein. 2012. Sensitive butterflies of San Diego County, California. Booklet provided for a  workshop focusing on nine sensitive butterflies. Produced by F.L.I.T.E. Tours. 72 pp.  Feber, R. E., H. Smith, and D. W. Macdonald. 1996. “The effects on butterfly abundance of the management  of uncropped edges of arable fields.” Journal of Applied Ecology 33:1191–1205.  Federal  Highway  Administration  (FHWA).  2011.  Our  Nation’s  Highways  2011.  U.S.  Department  of  Transportation.  Federal  Highway  Administration  (FHWA).  2016.  Use  of  Benefit‐Cost  Analysis  by  State  Departments  of  Transportation:  Report  to  Congress.  Available:  https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/policy/otps/pubs/ bca_report/senate_bca_report_05172016_revised.pdf.   Federal  Highway  Administration  (FHWA).  2017.  Roadside  Revegetation:  An  Integrated  Approach  to  Establishing  Native  Plants  and  Pollinator  Habitat.  Version  1.2.  Available:  http://www.nativerevegetation.org/learn/manual_2017/pdfs/wfl_v1‐2_06262020.pdf.   Fiedler, A. K., D. A. Landis, and M. Arduser. 2012. “Rapid shift  in pollinator communities following  invasive  species removal.” Restoration Ecology 20(5):593–602.  Fischer, S. J. 2015. “Enhancing monarch butterfly reproduction by mowing fields of common milkweed.” The  American Midland Naturalist 173(2):229–240.  Forister,  M.  L.  2021.  “Prioritizing  western  butterflies  for  conservation  concern.”  Available:  https://sites.google.com/site/greatbasinbuglab/ranking. Accessed December 28, 2021.  Forister, M. L., A. C. McCall, N. J. Sanders, J. A. Fordyce, J. H. Thorne, J. O’Brien, D. P. Waetjen, and A. M.  Shapiro. 2010. Compounded Effects of Climate Change and Habitat Alteration Shift Patterns of Butterfly  Diversity. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 107(5):2088–2092.  Forister, M. L., C. A. Halsch, C. C. Nice, J. A. Fordyce, T. E. Dilts, J. C. Oliver, K. L. Prudic, A. M. Shapiro, J. K.  Wilson, and J. Glassberg. 2021. “Fewer butterflies seen by community scientists across the warming and  drying landscapes of the American West.” Science 371:1042–1045.   Forister, M. L., J. P. Jahner, K. L. Casner, J. S. Wilson, and A. M. Shapiro. 2011. “The race is not to the swift:  long‐term data reveal pervasive declines in California’s low‐elevation butterfly fauna.” Ecology 92:2222– 2235.  Forman, R. T. T., D. Sperling, J. A. Bissonette, A. P. Clevenger, C. D. Cutshall, V. H. Dale, L. Fahrig, R. France, C.  R. Goldman, K. Heanue, J. A. Jones, F. J. Swanson, T. Turrentine, and T. C. Winter. 2003. Road Ecology: Science and Solutions. Island Press, Washington, DC.

References and Other Resources  R-10 Foster, B. L., K. Kindscher, G. R. Houseman, and C. A. Murphy. 2009. “Effects of hay management and native  species sowing on grassland community structure, biomass, and  restoration.” Ecological Applications  19(7):1884–1896.  Fuller, T. C., and G. D. Barbe. 1985. The Bradley method of eliminating exotic plants from natural reserves.”  Fremontia 13(2):24–26.  Funasaki, G. Y., P. L. Lai, L. M. Nakahara, J. W. Beardsley, and A. K. Ota. 1988. “A review of biological control  introductions in Hawaii: 1890 to 1985.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 28:105–160.  Fürst, M. A., D. P. McMahon,  J. L. Osborne, R.  J. Paxton, and M.  J. F. Brown. 2014. “Disease associations  between honeybees and bumblebees as a threat to wild pollinators.” Nature 506(7488):364–366.  Gade, K. J. 2013. Freeways as Corridors for Plant Dispersal: A Case Study from Central Arizona. Proceedings of  the  2013  International  Conference  on  Ecology  and  Transportation.  Available:  http://www.icoet.net/ICOET_2013/documents/papers/ICOET2013_Paper403B_Gade.pdf.  Gagné, W. C., and C. C. Christensen. 1985. “Conservation status of native terrestrial invertebrates in Hawaii.”  Hawaii’s  terrestrial  ecosystems:  preservation  and  management.  University  of  Hawaii  Cooperative  National Park Resources Studies Unit, Honolulu, pp. 105–126.  Gagné, W. C., and F. G. Howarth. 1982. “Conservation Status of Endemic Hawaiian Lepidoptera.” Proceedings  of  the  Third  Congress  of  European  Lepidopterology,  Societus  Europaea  Lepidopterologica,  Karluhe.  Cambridge. pp. 74–84.  Gall, L. F. 1984. “Population structure and recommendations for conservation of the narrowly endemic alpine  butterfly, Boloria acrocnema (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).” Biological Conservation 28:111–138.  Garibaldi, L. A., I. Steffan‐Dewenter, C. Kremen, J. M. Morales, R. Bommarco, S. A. Cunningham, et al. 2011.  “Stability of pollination services decreases with isolation from natural areas despite honey bee visits.”  Ecology Letters 14(10):1062–1072.  Garibaldi, L. A., I. Steffan‐Dewenter, R. Winfree, M. A. Aizen, R. Bommarco, S. A. Cunningham, C. Kremen, L.  G. Carvalheiro, L. D. Harder, O. Afik, I. Bartomeus, F. Benjamin, V. Boreux, D. Cariveau, N. P. Chacoff, J.  H. Dudenhöffer, B. M. Freitas, J. Ghazoul, S. Greenleaf, J. Hipólito, A. Holzschuh, B. Howlett, R. Isaacs, S.  K.  Javorek, C. M. Kennedy, K. M. Krewenka,  S. Krishnan, Y. Mandelik, M. M. Mayfield,  I. Motzke, T.  Munyuli, B. A. Nault, M. Otieno, J. Petersen, G. Pisanty, S. G. Potts, R. Rader, T. H. Ricketts, M. Rundlöf,  C. L. Seymour, C. Schüepp, H. Szentgyörgyi, H. Taki, T. Tscharntke, C. H. Vergara, B. F. Viana, T. C. Wanger,  C. Westphal, N. Williams, and A. M. Klein. 2013. “Wild pollinators enhance fruit set of crops regardless  of honey bee abundance.” Science 339:1608–1611.  Gelbard,  J. L., and  J. Belnap. 2003. “Roads as conduits  for exotic plant  invasions  in a semiarid  landscape.”  Conservation Biology 17(2):420–432.  Geldmann,  J.,  and  J.  P.  González‐Varo.  2018.  :Conserving  honey  bees  does  not  help  wildlife.”  Science  359(6374):392–393.  Ghazoul, J. 2006. “Floral diversity and the facilitation of pollination.” Journal of Ecology 94:295–304.  Gibble, W.,  and  J.  Fleckenstein.  2013.  Copablepharon  fuscum  (sand‐verbena moth)  and Abronia  latifolia  (yellow sand‐verbena) Washington State Surveys. Natural Heritage Report 2013‐02. Prepared  for U.S.  Fish and Wildlife Service. January 14, 2013. 16 pp. + appendix. 

References and Other Resources  R-11 Gjessing, E., E. Lygren, L. Berglind, T. Gulbrandsen, and R. Skanne. 1984. “Effect of highway runoff on  lake  water quality.” Science of the Total Environment 33(1‐4):245–257.  Glenny, W. R., J. B. Runyon, and L. A. Burkle. 2018. “Drought and increased CO2 alter floral visual and olfactory  traits with context‐dependent effects on pollinator visitation.” New Phytologist 220(3):785–798.  Gorelick, G. A., and R. S. Wielgus. 1968. “Notes and observations on  the biology and host preferences of  Vanessa tameamea (Nymphalidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 22(2):111–114.  Goulson, D. 2003. Bumblebees, Their Behavior and Ecology. Oxford University Press. 235 pages.  Gove, B.,  S. A. Power, G. P. Buckley,  and  J. Ghazoul. 2007.  “Effects of herbicide  spray drift  and  fertilizer  overspread on selected species of woodland ground flora: comparison between short‐term and  long‐ term impact assessments and field surveys.” Journal of Applied Ecology 44(2):374–384.  Graham, J., C. King, and W. Haines. 2015. “The nest architecture of Hylaeus anthracinus and other coastal  solitary bees.” Hawaii Conservation Conference Proceedings. August 3–6, 2015. University of Hawaii,  Hilo, Hawaii.  Graham, J., S. Plentovich, and C. King. 2016. Nest ecology of an endemic Hawaiian bee, Hylaeus anthracinus  (Hymenoptera: Colletidae), and implications for conservation. University of Hawaii at Manoa. College of  Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources. Unpublished Data.  Grant, V. 1994. Historical Development of Ornithophily in The Western North American Flora. Proceedings of  the National Academy of Sciences, 91(22):10407–10411.  Greenleaf, S. S., and C. Kremen. 2006. “Wild bee species increase tomato production and respond differently  to surrounding land use in Northern California.” Biological conservation 133:81–87.  Griscom, B. W., J. Adams, P. W. Ellis, R. A. Houghton, G. Lomax, D. A. Miteva, W. H. Schlesinger, D. Shoch, J.  V. Siikamäki, P. Smith, P. Woodbury, C. Zganjar, A. Blackman, J. Campari, R. T. Conant, C. Delgado, P. Elias, T. Gopalakrishna, M. R. Hamsik, M. Herrero, J. Kiesecker, E. Landis, L. Laestadius, S. M. Leavitt, S. Minnemeyer, S. Polasky, P. Potapov, F. E. Putz, J. Sanderman, M. Silvius, E. Wollenberg, and J. Fargione. 2017. Natural  Climate  Solutions.  Proceedings  of  the National  Academy  of  Sciences,  114(44):11645– 11650. Griswold,  T.  1993.  “New  species  of  Perdita  (Pygoperdita)  Timberlake  of  the  P.  californica  species  group  (Hymenoptera: Andrenidae).” The Pan‐Pacific Entomologist 69:183–189.  Grixti, J. C., L. T. Wong, S. A. Cameron, and C. Favret. 2009. “Decline of bumble bees (Bombus) in the North  American Midwest.” Biological Conservation 142:75–84.  Grunau, L., A. K. Ruggles, M. Veneer, C. Pague, R. Rondeau, and J. M. Powell. 2003. Programmatic Biological  Assessment,  Conference  Report,  and  Conservation  Strategy  for  Impacts  from  Transportation  Improvement  Projects  on  Select  Sensitive  Species  on  Colorado’s  Central  Shortgrass  Prairie.  May.  Available: http://hermes.cde.state.co.us/drupal/islandora/object/co:12176/datastream/OBJ/view.   Gustafson, D. J., D. J. Gibson, and D. L. Nickrent. 2005. “Using local seeds in prairie restoration—data support  the paradigm.” Native Plants Journal 6(1):25–28.  Guyton, J., J. C. Jones, and E. Entsminger. 2014. Alternative Mowing Regimes’ Influence on Native Plants and  Deer. Report No. FHWA/MDOT‐RD‐14‐228. 

References and Other Resources  R-12 Haack, R. A. 1993. The endangered Karner blue butterfly  (Lepidoptera: Lycaenidae): biology, management  considerations, and data gaps.  Haan, N.  L.,  and D. A.  Landis.  2019.  “Grassland  disturbance  increases monarch  butterfly  oviposition  and  decreases arthropod predator abundance.” Biological Conservation 233:185–192.  Haan, N. L., J. D. Bakker, P. W. Dunwiddie, and M. J. Linders. 2018. “Instar‐specific effects of host plants on  survival of endangered butterfly  larvae: Host plants and caterpillar ontogeny.” Ecological Entomology  43:742–753.  Habel, J. C., M. Husemann, T. Schmitt, and W. Ulrich. 2020. “Island‐mainland lepidopteran assemblies: a blue‐ print for species conservation in fragmented habitats.” Biodiversity and Conservation 29(11):3313–3325.  Habel, J. C., W. Ulrich, and T. Schmitt. 2020. “Butterflies in corridors: quality matters for specialists.” Insect  Conservation and Diversity 13(1):91–98.  Haddad, N. M. 1999. “Corridor and distance effects on interpatch movements: a landscape experiment with  butterflies.” Ecological Applications 9:612–622.   Haddad, N. M.,  and  K. A. Baum.  1999.  “An  experimental  test  of  corridor  effects  on  butterfly  densities.”  Ecological Applications 9:623–633.   Haddad, N. M., B. Hudgens, C. Damiani, K. Gross, D. Kuefler, and K. Pollock. 2008.  “Determining optimal  population monitoring for rare butterflies.” Conservation Biology 22(4):929–940.  Haines, W. 2018. Personal communication with Michele Blackburn and Candace Fallon, the Xerces Society.  Research  Entomologist,  Hawaii  Invertebrate  Program,  Hawaii  Department  of  Land  and  Natural  Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife, University of Hawaii, Center for Conservation Research and  Training, Honolulu, Hawaii. 22 October 2018.  Haines, W. 2019. Personal communication with Michele Blackburn, Conservation Biologist, the Xerces Society.  Research  Entomologist,  Hawaii  Invertebrate  Program,  Hawaii  Department  of  Land  and  Natural  Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife University of Hawaii, Center for Conservation Research and  Training. January 8–10, 2019.  Halbritter, D. A., J. C. Daniels, D. C. Whitaker, and L. Huang. 2015. “Reducing mowing  frequency  increases  floral  resource  and  butterfly  (Lepidoptera: Hesperioidea  and  Papilionoidea)  abundance  in managed  roadside margins.” Florida Entomologist 98(4):1081–1092.  Hall,  F.  C.  2002.  Photo  Point Monitoring Handbook. Gen.  Tech.  Rep.  PNW‐GTR‐526. U.S. Department  of  Agriculture,  Forest  Service,  Pacific  Northwest  Research  Station,  Portland,  OR.  Available:  https://www.fs.fed.us/pnw/pubs/gtr526/.  Hamm, C. A., B. L. Williams, and D. A. Landis. 2013. “Natural history and conservation status of the endangered  Mitchell’s satyr butterfly: synthesis and expansion of our knowledge  regarding Neonympha mitchellii  mitchellii (French 1889).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 67:15–28.  Hamm, C. A., V. Rademacher, D. A. Landis, and B. L. Williams. 2013. Data from: Conservation genetics and the  implication for recovery of the endangered Mitchell’s satyr butterfly, Neonympha mitchellii mitchellii.  Dryad Digital Repository. 

References and Other Resources  R-13 Hammond, P. 2012. Personal communication with Sarah Foltz  Jordan,  the Xerces Society  for  Invertebrate  Conservation. Lepidopterist and Research Associate  in  the Department of Entomology, Oregon State  University. January 3.  Hansen, M. J., and A. P. Clevenger. 2005. “The influence of disturbance and habitat on the presence of non‐ native plant species along transport corridors.” Biological Conservation 125(2):249–259.  Hanula, J. L., and S. Horn. 2011. “Removing an invasive shrub (Chinese privet) increases native bee diversity  and abundance in riparian forests of the southeastern United States.” Insect Conservation and Diversity  4(4):275–283.  Harmon‐Threatt, A. N.,  and  C.  Kremen.  2015.  “Bumble  bees  selectively  use  native  and  exotic  species  to  maintain nutritional  intake across highly variable and  invaded  local  floral  resource pools.” Ecological  Entomology 40(4):471–478.  Harper‐Lore, B., and M. Wilson, Eds. 2000. Roadside Use of Native Plants. Island Press, Washington, DC, 665  pp.  Harper‐Lore, B., M. Johnson, and W. F. Ostrum. 2013. Vegetation Management: An Ecoregional Approach.  United States Department of Transportation Federal Highway Administration.  Harrison, G. L. 2014. Economic Impact of Ecosystem Services Provided by Ecologically Sustainable Roadside  Right of Way Vegetation Management Practices. University of Florida/IFAS, Wakulla County Extension  Service.  Harvey, J. A., K. Tougeron, R. Gols, R. Heinen, M. Abarca, P. K. Abram, Y. Basset, M. Berg, C. Boggs, J. Brodeur,  P. Cardoso, J. G. de Boer, G. R. De Snoo, C. Deacon, J. E. Dell, N. Desneux, M. E. Dillon, G. A. Duffy, L. A. Dyer, J. Ellers, A. Espíndola, J. Fordyce, M. L. Forister, C. Fukushima, M. J. G. Gage, C. García‐Robledo, C. Gely, M. Gobbi, C. Hallmann, T. Hance, J. Harte, A. Hochkirch, C. Hof, A. A. Hoffmann, J. G. Kingsolver, G.  P. A. Lamarre, W. F. Laurance, B. Lavandero, S. R. Leather, P. Lehmann, C. Le Lann, M. M. López‐Uribe, C.‐S. Ma, G. Ma, J. Moiroux, L. Monticelli, C. Nice, P. J. Ode, S. Pincebourde, W. J. Ripple, M. Rowe, M. J.  Samways, A. Sentis, A. A. Shah, N. Stork, J. S. Terblanche, M. P. Thakur, M. B. Thomas, J. M. Tylianakis, J.  Van Baaren, M. Van de Pol, W. H. Van der Putten, H. Van Dyck, W. C. E. P. Verberk, D. L. Wagner, W. W. Weisser, W. C. Wetzel, H. A. Woods, K. A. G. Wyckhuys, and S. L. Chown. 2022. Scientists’ warning on climate change and insects. Ecological Monographs: e1553. Hatfield, R. G., and G. LeBuhn. 2007. “Patch and landscape factors shape community assemblage of bumble  bees, Bombus spp.  (Hymenoptera: Apidae),  in montane meadows.” Biological Conservation 139:150– 158.  Hatfield, R. G., S. R. Colla, S.  Jepsen, L. L. Richardson, and R. W. Thorp. 2016.  International Union  for  the  Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Assessments for North American Bombus spp. for the North American  IUCN Bumble Bee Specialist Group. The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Hatfield, R., C. Fallon, and M. Blackburn. 2018. Mardon skipper (Polites mardon) distance sampling surveys at  four sentinel sites in Oregon and Washington: Year 5. Final report to the U.S. Forest Service, Bureau of  Land Management, and the Interagency Special Status/Sensitive Species Program (ISSSSP). The Xerces  Society, Portland, OR. 31 pp. 

References and Other Resources  R-14 Hatfield, R., R. Jepsen, R. Thorp, L. Richardson, S. Colla, and S. Foltz Jordan. 2015. “Bombus pensylvanicus.”  The  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species  2015:  e.T21215172A21215281.  Available:  https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015‐4.RLTS.T21215172A21215281.en. Accessed: March 24, 2020.  Hatfield, R., S. Jepsen, E. Mader, S. H. Black, and M. Shepherd. 2012. Conserving Bumble Bees, Guidelines for  Creating  and Managing  Habitat  for  America’s  Declining  Pollinators.  32  pp.  The  Xerces  Society  for  Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Hatfield, R., S. Jepsen, R. Thorp, L. Richardson, and S. Colla. 2015. “Bombus terricola.” The IUCN Red List of  Threatened  Species  2015:  e.T44937505A46440206.  Available:  https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015‐2.RLTS.T44937505A46440206.en. Accessed: March 24, 2020.  Hatfield, R., S. Jepsen, R. Thorp, L. Richardson, S. Colla, and S. Foltz Jordan. 2015. “Bombus fervidus.” The IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species  2015:  e.T21215132A21215225.  Available:  https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015‐4.RLTS.T21215132A21215225.en. Accessed: March 24, 2020.  Hatfield, R., S. Jepsen, R. Thorp, R. Richardson, and S. Colla. 2015. “Bombus suckleyi.” The IUCN Red List of  Threatened  Species  2015:  e.T44937699A46440241.  Available:  https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2015‐2.RLTS.T44937699A46440241.en. Accessed: March 24, 2020.  Hausfather, Z., H. F. Drake, T. Abbott, and G. A. Schmidt. 2020. Evaluating the Performance of Past Climate  Model Projections. Geophysical Research Letters 47:1535.  Havens,  K.,  and  P.  Vitt.  2016.  “The  importance  of  phenological  diversity  in  seed  mixes  for  pollinator  restoration.” Natural Areas Journal 36(4):531–537.  Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources, Division of Forestry and Wildlife. 2015. Draft Habitat  Conservation Plan  for Game Management at Pu‘u Wa‘awa‘a and Pu‘u Anahulu. Napu’u Conservation  Project. 269 pp.  Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources. 2015. Hawai‘i’s State Wildlife Action Plan. Prepared by H.  T. Harvey and Associates, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. 1055 pp.  Hayhoe, K., D. Cayan, C. B. Field, P. C. Frumhoff, E. P. Maurer, N. L. Miller, S. C. Moser, S. H. Schneider, K. N.  Cahill, E. E. Cleland, L. Dale, R. Drapek, R. M. Hanemann, L. S. Kalkstein,  J. Lenihan, C. K. Lunch, R. P.  Neilson, S. C. Sheridan, and J. H. Verville. 2004. Emissions Pathways, Climate Change, and  Impacts on  California. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 101(34):12422–12427.  Heddle,  M.  L.  2004.  Tinostoma  smaragditis.  The  IUCN  Red  List  of  Threatened  Species  2004:  e.T21913A9339981.  Available:  https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2004.RLTS.T21913A9339981.en. Accessed: September 2020. Heddle, M. L., K. R. Wood, A. Asquith, and R. G. Gillespie. 2000. “Conservation status and research on the  Fabulous Green Sphinx of Kaua’i, Tinostoma smaragditis (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae), including checklists  of the vascular plants of the diverse mesic forests of Kaua‘i, Hawai‘i.” Pacific Science 54(1):1–9.  Henry,  E.  2010.  Master  of  Science  Thesis:  “A  first  step  towards  successful  habitat  restoration  and  reintroduction: Understanding  oviposition  site  selection of  an  imperiled butterfly, Mardon  skipper.”  Washington State University, School of Earth and Environmental Science.   Herrera, C. M. 1989. “Pollinator abundance, morphology, and flower visitation rate: analysis of the ‘quantity’  component in a plant‐pollinator system.” Oecologia 80:241–248. 

References and Other Resources  R-15 Herrmann, C. R. 2017. Living on the edge: assessing the effects of catastrophic fire on plants utilized by two  endemic subspecies of spring mountains butterflies. MS, University of Nevada Las Vegas.  Hess, A. N., R.  J. Hess,  J.  L. M. Hess, B. Paulan,  and  J. A. M. Hess.  2014.  “American bison  influences on  lepidopteran  and  wild  blue  lupine  distribution  in  an  oak  savanna  landscape.”  Journal  of  Insect  Conservation 18:327–338.  Holdren,  C.  E.,  and  P.  R.  Ehrlich.  1981.  “Long  range  dispersal  in  checkerspot  butterflies:  Transplant  experiments with Euphydryas gillettii.” Oecologia 50:125–129.  Hopwood,  J.  L.  2008.  “The  contribution  of  roadside  grassland  restorations  to  native  bee  conservation.”  Biological Conservation 141:2632–2640.  Hopwood, J., L. Winkler, B. Deal, and M. Chivvis. 2010. Use of roadside prairie plantings by native bees. Living  Roadway  Trust  Fund.  Available:  http://www.iowalivingroadway.com/ResearchProjects/90‐00‐LRTF‐ 011.pdf. Accessed: October 2014.  Hopwood,  J., S. H. Black, and S. Fleury. 2016a. Pollinators and Roadsides: Best Management Practices  for  Managers and Decision Makers. 96 pp.  Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC. Available:  https://www.environment.fhwa.dot.gov/ecosystems/Pollinators_Roadsides/BMPs_pollinators_roadsid es.pdf.  Hopwood,  J.,  S. H.  Black,  and  S.  Fleury.  2016b.  Identifying  the  Current  State  of  Practice  for  Vegetation  Management  Associated  with  Pollinator  Health  and  Habitat:  An  Interview  Report.  38  pp.  Federal  Highway  Administration,  Washington,  DC.  Available:  https://www.environment.fhwa.dot.gov/ env_topics/ecosystems/pollinator_reports/pollinator_interview_rpt.aspx.  Hopwood, J., S. H. Black, E. Lee‐Mader, A. Charlap, R. Preston, K. Mozumder, and S. Fleury. 2015. Literature  Review: Pollinator Habitat Enhancement and Best Management Practices  in Highway Rights‐of‐Way.  Prepared by The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation in collaboration with ICF International. 68  pp. Federal Highway Administration, Washington, DC.  Houseal,  G.,  and  D.  Smith.  2000.  “Source‐identified  seed:  The  Iowa  roadside  experience.”  Ecological  Restoration 18(3):173–183.  Howarth, F. G. 1985. “Impacts of alien land arthropods and mollusks on native plants and animals in Hawaii.”  Hawaii’s  terrestrial ecosystems: preservation and management. University of Hawaii Press, Honolulu,  Hawaii. Pp. 149–179.  Howarth, F. G., and W. P. Mull. 1992. Hawaiian Insects and Their Kin. University of Hawaii Press. Honolulu,  Hawaii. 160 pp.  Howarth, F. G., D. J. Preston, and R. Pyle. 2012. Surveying for Terrestrial Arthropods (Insects and Relatives)  Occurring within the Kahului Airport Environs, Maui, Hawai‘i: Synthesis Report. Hawaii Biological Survey.  Bishop Museum Technical Report 58, Honolulu, Hawaii. 225 pp.  Huijser, M. P., and A. P. Clevenger. 2006. “Habitat and corridor function of rights‐of‐way.” In The Ecology of  Transportation: Managing Mobility for the Environment (pp. 233–254). Springer Netherlands.  Huijser, M. P., P. McGowen, J. Fuller, A. Hardy, A. Kociolek, A. P. Clevenger, D. Smith, and R. Ament. 2008.  Wildlife‐Vehicle  Collision  Reduction  Study:  Report  to  Congress.  FHWA‐HRT‐08‐034.  Available:  https://www.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/research/safety/08034/08034.pdf.  

References and Other Resources  R-16 Humbert, J‐Y., J. Ghazoul, G. J. Sauter, and T. Walter. 2010. “Impact of different meadow mowing techniques  on field invertebrates.” Journal of Applied Entomology 134(7):592–599.  Huntzinger, M. 2003. “Effects of  fire management practices on butterfly diversity  in  the  forested western  United States.” Biological Conservation 113(1):1–12.  iNaturalist. 2020.  iNaturalist Network  (web application): “Hylaeus.” Available: http://www.inaturalist.org/.  Accessed: September 2020.  Ing, K., and C.  L. Mogren. 2020.  “Evidence of  competition between honey bees and Hylaeus anthracinus  (Hymenoptera: Colletidae), an endangered Hawaiian yellow‐faced bee.” Pacific Science 74(1):75–85.  Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC). 2018: Summary for Policymakers. In: Global Warming of  1.5°C. An IPCC Special Report on the Impacts of Global Warming of 1.5°C Above Pre‐Industrial Levels and  Related Global Greenhouse Gas Emission Pathways, in the Context of Strengthening the Global Response  to the Threat of Climate Change, Sustainable Development, and Efforts to Eradicate Poverty. V. Masson‐ Delmotte, P. Zhai, H.‐O. Pörtner, D. Roberts, J. Skea, P.R. Shukla, A. Pirani, W. Moufouma‐Okia, C. Péan,  R. Pidcock, S. Connors, J.B.R. Matthews, Y. Chen, X. Zhou, M.I. Gomis, E. Lonnoy, T. Maycock, M. Tignor,  and T. Waterfield (eds.). World Meteorological Organization, Geneva, Switzerland.  Intergovernmental  Science‐Policy  Platform  on  Biodiversity  and  Ecosystem  Services  (IPBES).  2016.  The  assessment report on pollinators, pollination and food production. S. G. Potts, V. L. Imperatriz‐Fonseca,  and H. T. Ngo (Eds.). Secretariat of the Intergovernmental Science‐Policy Platform on Biodiversity and  Ecosystem Services, Bonn, Germany. 552 pages. Available: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3402856.  Jablonski, B., Z. Koltowsk, J. Marcinkowski, H. Rybak‐Chmielewska, T. Szczesna, and Z. Warakomska. 1995.  “Zawartosc metali ciezkich [Pb, Cd, i Cu] w nektarze, miodzie i pylku pochodzacym z roslin rosnacych przy  szlakach komunikacyjnych [The content of heavy metals (Pb, Cd and Cu) in the nectar, honey and pollen  collected from roadside plants].” Pszczelnicze Zeszyty Naukowe 39:129–144.  Jacobsen, R. L., N. J. Albrecht, and K. E. Bolin. 1990. “Wildflower Routes: Benefits of a Management Program  for Minnesota Right‐of‐Way Prairies.” Proceedings of  the Twelfth North American Prairie Conference  153–158.  James, D. G., and D. Nunnallee. 2011. Life Histories of Cascadia Butterflies. Oregon State University Press,  Corvallis, Oregon. 447 pp.  Jepsen, S., E. Evans, R. Thorp, R. Hatfield, and S. H. Black. 2013. Petition to List the Rusty Patched Bumble Bee,  Bombus affinis (Cresson), 1863, as an Endangered Species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Xerces  Society  for  Invertebrate  Conservation.  Available:  https://www.xerces.org/sites/default/files/2018‐ 07/Bombus‐affinis‐petition.pdf.   Johnson, A. M. 2000. Best Practices Handbook on Roadside Vegetation Management. Minnesota Department  of  Transportation,  Report  #  2000‐19,  University  of  Minnesota  132  pp.,  p.  78.  Available:  http://www.lrrb.org/media/reports/200820.pdf. Accessed: November 2020.  Johst, K., M. Drechsler,  J. Thomas, and  J.  Settele. 2006.  “Influence of mowing on  the persistence of  two  endangered large blue butterfly species.” Journal of Applied Ecology 43(2):333–342. 

References and Other Resources  R-17 Jordan, S. F., S. H. Black, and S. Jepsen. 2012. Petition to list the island marble butterfly, Euchloe ausonides  insulanus (Guppy and Shepard, 2001) as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  Xerces Society  for  Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, Oregon. Available: https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/ tess/petition/631.pdf. Accessed December 29, 2021.   Jump, P. M., T. Longcore, and C. Rich. 2006. “Ecology and distribution of a newly discovered population of the  federally threatened Euproserpinus euterpe (Sphingidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 60:41– 50.  Kantola, T., J. L. Tracy, K. A. Baum, M. A. Quinn, and R. N. Coulson. 2019. “Spatial risk assessment of eastern  monarch butterfly  road mortality during autumn migration within  the  southern  corridor.” Biological  Conservation 231:150–160.  Kearns, C. A. 2001. “North American dipteran pollinators: Assessing  their value and conservation  status.”  Conservation Ecology 5(1).  Kearns, C. A., and J. D. Thompson. 2001. The Natural History of Bumble bees. A Sourcebook for Investigations.  Boulder: University Press of Colorado.  Kearns, C. A., D. A.  Inouye, and N. M. Waser. 1998. “Endangered mutualisms:  the conservation of plant– pollinator interactions.” Annual Review of Ecology & Systematics 29:83–113.  Keilsohn, W., D. L. Narango, and D. W. Tallamy. 2018. “Roadside habitat  impacts  insect  traffic mortality.”  Journal of Insect Conservation 22(2):183–188.  Kerwin,  A.  E.  2011.  Conservation  assessment  for  the  mardon  skipper  (Polites  mardon).  Version  2.0.  Interagency Special Status/Sensitive Species Program, USDA Forest Service Region 6, and USDI Bureau  of Land Management, Oregon and Washington. 60 pp.  Kevan, P. G. 1975. “Forest application of the  insecticide  fenitrothion and  its effect on wild bee pollinators  (Hymenoptera: Apoidea) of lowbush blueberries (Vaccinium spp.) in Southern New Brunswick, Canada.”  Biological Conservation 7(4):301–309.  Kevan,  P.  G.  1999.  “Pollinators  as  bioindicators  of  the  state  of  the  environment:  species,  activity  and  diversity.” Agriculture Ecosystems & Environment 74(1‐3):373–393.  Keysmoths.com.  No  date.  “Euphyes  pilatka  klotsi,  Palatka  Skipper.”  "Available:  https://www.keysmoths.com/euphyes‐pilatka‐klotsi‐palatka‐skip/.   Kingsley,  K.  J.  1996.  “Behavior  of  the  Delhi  Sands  Flower‐Loving  Fly  (Diptera: Mydidae),  a  Little‐Known  Endangered Species.” Annals of the Entomological Society of America 89:883–891.  Kingsley, K. J. 2002. “Population dynamics, resource use, and conservation needs of the delhi sands flower‐ loving fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis Cazier) (Diptera: Mydidae), an Endangered Species.”  Journal of Insect Conservation 6:93–101.  Kitching,  I.  J., and  J. M. Cadiou. 2000. Hawkmoths of  the World. Comstock Publishing Associates, Cornell  University Press. Ithaca, New York. 227 pp.  Klein, A. M., B. E. Vaissiere, J. H. Cane, I. Steffan‐Dewenter, S. A. Cunningham, C. Kremen, and T. Tscharntke.  2007.  “Importance of pollinators  in  changing  landscapes  for world  crops.” Proceedings of  the Royal  Society of London B: Biological Sciences 274(1608):303–313. 

References and Other Resources  R-18 Kleintjes Neff, P., C. Locke, and E. Lee‐Mӓder. 2017. “Assessing a farmland set‐aside conservation program  for an endangered butterfly: USDA State Acres  for Wildlife Enhancement  (SAFE)  for  the Karner blue  butterfly.” Journal of Insect Conservation 21:929–941.  Koch, J. B., and H. F. Sahli. 2013. “Patterns of flower visitation across elevation and successional gradients in  Hawai ‘i.” Pacific Science 67(2):253–266.  Koch, J. B., and J. P. Strange. 2012. “The status of Bombus occidentalis and B. moderatus in Alaska with special  focus on Nosema bombi incidence.” Northwest Science 86(3):212–220.  Kociolek, A., C. Grilo, and S. Jacobson. 2015. “Flight doesn’t solve everything: Mitigation of road impacts on  Birds.” In: van der Ree, Rodney, Daniel J. Smith, and Clara Grilo (Eds.) Handbook of Road Ecology. John  Wiley & Sons, Ltd., Chichester, UK. pp. 281–289.  Kremen, C., K. S. Ullman, and R. W. Thorp. 2011. “Evaluating the quality of citizen‐scientist data on pollinator  communities.” Conservation Biology 25(3):607–617.  Kremen,  C.,  N. M. Williams,  and  R. W.  Thorp.  2002a.  Crop  Pollination  from  Native  Bees  at  Risk  From  Agricultural Intensification. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99(26):16812–16816.  Kremen, C., R. L. Bugg, N. Nicola, S. A. Smith, R. W. Thorp, and N. M. Williams. 2002b. “Native bees, native  plants, and crop pollination in California.” Fremontia 30(3‐4):41–49.  Kruess, A., and T. Tscharntke. 2002. “Grazing intensity and the diversity of grasshoppers, butterflies, and trap‐ nesting bees and wasps.” Conservation Biology 16:1570–80.  Kudo,  G.,  and  E.  J.  Cooper.  2019.  “When  spring  ephemerals  fail  to  meet  pollinators:  mechanism  of  phenological mismatch  and  its  impact  on  plant  reproduction.”  Proceedings  of  the  Royal  Society  B  286(1904):20190573.  Kuefler, D., N. M. Haddad, S. Hall, B. Hudgens, B. Bartel, and E. Hoffman. 2008. “Distribution, Population  Structure  and  Habitat  Use  of  the  Endangered  Saint  Francis  Satyr  Butterfly,  Neonympha  mitchellii  francisci.” American Midland Naturalist 159(2):298–320.  Kuppler, J., M. K. Höfers, W. Trutschnig, A. C. Bathke, J. A. Eiben, C. C. Daehler, and R. R. Junker. 2017. “Exotic  flower visitors exploit large floral trait spaces resulting in asymmetric resource partitioning with native  visitors.” Functional Ecology 31(12):2244–2254.  Kutlesa, N.  J., and S. Caveney. 2001. “Insecticidal activity of glufosinate  through glutamine depletion  in a  caterpillar.” Pest Management Science 57:25–32.  LaBar, C. C., and C. B. Schultz. 2012. “Investigating the role of herbicides  in controlling  invasive grasses  in  prairie habitats: effects on non‐target butterflies.” Natural Areas Journal 32(2):177–189.  Lach,  L.  2005.  “Interference  and  exploitation  competition  of  three  nectar‐thieving  invasive  ant  species.”  Insectes Sociaux 52:257–262.  Lach, L., and L. M. Hooper‐Bui. 2010. Consequences of ant invasions. In: Lach, L., C. L. Parr, and K. L. Abbott  (Eds.), Ant Ecology. Oxford University Press, Inc., Oxford. pp. 261–286.  Lambert, A. M. 2011. Natural history and population ecology of a rare pierid butterfly, Euchloe ausonides  insulanus Guppy and Shepard (Pieridae). Ph.D., University of Washington. 

References and Other Resources  R-19 Lampinen, J. and Anttila, N., 2021. Reconciling road verge management with grassland conservation is met  with positive attitudes among stakeholders, but faces implementation barriers related to resources and  valuation. Journal of Environmental Planning and Management, 64(5), pp.823‐845.  Lange, M., N. Eisenhauer, C. A. Sierra, H. Bessler, C. Engels, R. I. Griffiths, P. G. Mellado‐Vázquez, A. A. Malik,  J. Roy, S. Scheu, S. Steinbeiss, B. C. Thomson, S. E. Trumbore, and G. Gleixner. 2015. “Plant diversity  increases soil microbial activity and soil carbon storage.” Nature Communications 6:6707.  Launer, A. E., D. D. Murphy, J. M. Hoekstra, and H. R. Sparrow. 1992. “The endangered Myrtle’s silverspot  butterfly: present status and initial conservation planning.” The Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera  31:132–146.  Lavsund, S., and F. Sandegren. 1991. “Moose‐vehicle relations in Sweden: a review.” Alces 27:118–126.  Leharne, S., D. Charesworth, and B. Chowdhry. 1992. “A survey of metal  levels  in street dusts  in an  inner  London neighbourhood.” Environment International 18:263–270.  Liebherr, J. K., and D. A. Polhemus. 1997. “R. C. L. Perkins: 100 years of Hawaiian entomology.” Pacific Science  51(4):343–355.  Lindzey, S., and E. F. Connor. 2011. “Monitoring the mission blue butterfly using immature stages.” Journal of  Insect Conservation 15:765–773.  Longcore, T., C. S. Lam, P. Kobernus, E. Polk, and J. P. Wilson. 2010. “Extracting useful data from imperfect  monitoring  schemes:  endangered  butterflies  at  San  Bruno Mountain,  San Mateo  County,  California  (1982–2000) and implications for habitat management.” Journal of Insect Conservation 14:335–346.  Lotts,  K.,  and  T.  Naberhaus,  coordinators.  2017.  Butterflies  and  moths  of  North  America.  Available:  www.butterfliesandmoths.org (Version 09292020).  Louda, S. M., C. Kendall, J. Connor, and D. Simberloff. 1997. “Ecological effects of an insect introduced for the  biological control of weeds.” Science 277:1088–1090.  Lövei, G. L., A. Macleod, and J. M. Hickman. 1998. “Dispersal and effects of barriers on the movement of the  New Zealand hover fly Melanostoma fasciatum (Dipt., Syrphidae) on cultivated land.” Journal of Applied  Entomology 122(1‐5):115–120.  Lucey,  A.,  and  S.  Barton.  2010.  Public  Perception  and  Sustainable  Roadside  Vegetation  Management  strategies.  Available:  http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.347.2930& rep=rep1&type=pdf.   Macdonald, E., R. Sanders, and P. Supawanich. 2008. The Effects of Transportation Corridors’ Roadside Design  Features on User Behavior and Safety, and Their Contributions to Health, Environmental Quality, and  Community  Economic  Vitality:  A  Literature  Review.  University  of  California  Transportation  Center,  Research Report 878.   Macgregor, C. J., M. J. Pocock, R. Fox, and D. M. Evans. 2015. “Pollination by nocturnal Lepidoptera, and the  effects of light pollution: a review.” Ecological Entomology 40(3):187–198.  Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus anthracinus. In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  

References and Other Resources  R-20 Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus assimulans. In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus  facilis.  In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus hilaris.  In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.   Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus kuakea  In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus longiceps. In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.   Magnacca, K. N. 2005. Species Profile: Hylaeus mana.  In Shepherd, M. D., D. M. Vaughan, and S. H. Black  (Eds.), Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May 2005). The Xerces Society  for Invertebrate Conservation, Portland, OR.  Magnacca,  K.  N.  2007.  “Conservation  status  of  the  native  bees  of  Hawaii,  Hylaeus  (Nesoprosopis)  (Hymenoptera: Apoidea).” Pacific Science 61(2):173–190.  Magnacca, K. N. 2007. “New records of Hylaeus (Nesoprosopis) and Ceratina bees in Hawai‘i.” Bishop Museum  Occasional Papers 96:44–45. Honolulu, Hawaii.  Magnacca, K. N. 2018. Personal database of Hawaiian Hylaeus records. Entomological Specialist, Oahu Army  Natural Resources Program.  Magnacca, K. N., and B. N. Danforth. 2006. “Evolution and biogeography of native Hawaiian Hylaeus bees  (Hymenoptera: Colletidae).” Cladistics 22(5):393–411.  Magnacca, K. N., and C. King. 2013. Assessing the presence and distribution of 23 Hawaiian yellow‐faced bee  species on lands adjacent to military installations on O‘ahu and Hawai‘i Island. Technical Report No. 185.  Pacific Cooperative Studies Unit, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawai‘i. 39 pp.  Magrach, A., J. P. González‐Varo, M. Boiffier, M. Vilà, and I. Bartomeus. 2017. “Honeybee spillover reshuffles  pollinator diets and affects plant reproductive success.” Nature Ecology & Evolution 1(9):1299–1307.  Marschalek, D. A. 2004. Factors influencing population viability of hermes copper (Lycaena hermes). MS, San  Diego State University.  Marschalek,  D.  A.,  and  D.  H.  Deutschman.  2008.  “Hermes  copper  (Lycaena  [Hermelycaena]  hermes:  Lycaenidae):  life history and population estimation of a rare butterfly.” Journal of Insect Conservation  12:97–105.  Marschalek,  D.  A.,  and M. W.  Klein.  2010.  “Distribution,  ecology,  and  conservation  of  Hermes  copper  (Lycaenidae: Lycaena [Hermelycaena] hermes).” Journal of Insect Conservation 14:721–730. 

References and Other Resources  R-21 Marschalek, D. A., D. H. Deutschman, S. Strahm, and M. E. Berres. 2016. “Dynamic  landscapes shape post‐ wildfire  recolonisation  and  genetic  structure  of  the  endangered  Hermes  copper  (Lycaena  hermes)  butterfly: Hermes copper recolonisation and genetics.” Ecological Entomology 41:327–337.  Marschalek, D. A., J. A. Jesu, and M. E. Berres. 2013. “Impact of non‐lethal genetic sampling on the survival,  longevity and behaviour of  the Hermes copper  (Lycaena hermes) butterfly.”  Insect Conservation and  Diversity / Royal Entomological Society of London 6:658–662.  Mastro, L. L., M. R. Conover, and S. N. Frey. 2008. “Deer‐vehicle collision prevention techniques.” Human‐ Wildlife Conflicts 2(1):80–92.  Mattoni,  R.  1992.  Rediscovery  of  the  endangered  Palos  Verdes  blue  butterfly,  Glaucopsyche  lygdamus  palosverdesensis Perkins and Emmel (Lycaenidae). The Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera 31:180– 194.  Mattoni,  R.,  T.  Longcore,  C.  Zonneveld,  and  V.  Novotny.  2001.  “Analysis  of  transect  counts  to monitor  population size in endangered insects: The case of the El Segundo blue butterfly, Euphilotes bernardino  allyni.” Journal of Insect Conservation 5:197–206.  Mattoni, R., T. Longcore, Z. Krenova, and A. Lipman. 1998. “Mass rearing the endangered Palos Verdes blue  butterfly  (Glaucopsyche  lygdamus  palosverdesensis:  Lycaenidae).”  The  Journal  of  Research  on  the  Lepidoptera 37:55–67.  Mattoni, Rudi, Kurt Medinger, Richard Rogers, Christopher D. Nagano. 1997. Final recovery plan for the Delhi  sands flower‐loving fly. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  McCleery, R. A., A. R. Holdorf, L. L. Hubbard, and B. D. Peer. 2015. “Maximizing the Wildlife Conservation  Value of Road Right‐of‐Ways in an Agriculturally Dominated Landscape.” PLOS ONE 10(3):1–19.   McCorkle, D. V., and P. C. Hammond. 1988. “Biology of Speyeria zerene hippolyta (Nymphalidae) in a marine‐ modified environment.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 42:184–195.  McGregor,  S.  E.  1976.  Insect  Pollination  of  Cultivated  Crop  Plants. USDA Agriculture Handbook No.  496.  Available:  https://www.ars.usda.gov/ARSUserFiles/20220500/onlinepollinationhandbook.pdf.  Accessed: November 2020.  McKenna, D. D., K. M. McKenna, S. B. Malcom, and M. R. Berenbaum. 2001. “Mortality of Lepidoptera along  roadways in central Illinois.” Journal of the Lepidopterists Society 55(2):63–68.  Medeiros, A. C., L. L. Loope, and F. R. Cole. 1986. “Distribution of ants and their effects on endemic biota of  Haleakala  and  Hawaii  Volcanoes  National  Park:  a  preliminary  assessment.”  Proceedings  of  the  6th  Conference of Natural Sciences, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. Pp. 39–52.  Medeiros, A., and E. vonAllmen. 2006. Restoration of a native Hawaiian dryland forest at Auwahi, Maui. U.S.  Geological Survey Fact Sheet 2006–3035.  Medeiros, M. J., J. A. Eiben, W. P. Haines, R. L. Kaholoaa, C. B. A. King, P. D. Krushelnycky, K. N. Magnacca, D.  Rubinoff, F. Starr, and K. Starr. 2013. “The  importance of  insect monitoring to conservation actions  in  Hawaii.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 45:149–166.  Meissen, J. C., A. J. Glidden, M. E. Sherrard, K. J. Elgersma, and L. L. Jackson. 2019. “Seed mix design and first  year  management  influence  multifunctionality  and  cost‐effectiveness  in  prairie  reconstruction.”  Restoration Ecology 28(4):807–816. 

References and Other Resources  R-22 Memmott, J., and N. M. Waser. 2002. “Integration of alien plants  into a native flower–pollinator visitation  web.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London Series B: Biological Sciences 269:2395–2399.  Menz, M. H.,  R. D.  Phillips,  R. Winfree,  C.  Kremen, M.  A.  Aizen,  S. D.  Johnson,  and  K. W. Dixon.  2011.  “Reconnecting plants and pollinators: challenges in the restoration of pollination mutualisms.” Trends in  Plant Science 16(1):4–12.  Mesnage, R., and M. N. Antoniou. 2018. “Ignoring adjuvant toxicity falsifies the safety profile of commercial  pesticides.” Frontiers in Public Health 5:361.  Metalmark  Web  and  Data.  “Ferris’  Copper:  Lycaena  ferrisi  K.  Johnson  &  Balogh,  1977.”  Available:  https://www.butterfliesandmoths.org/species/Lycaena‐ferrisi.   Michener, C. D. 2007. The Bees of the World. 2nd Edition. Johns Hopkins University Press, Baltimore, Maryland.  972 pp.  Michigan  State  University.  No  date.  “Erynnis  persius  persius:  Persius  dusky  wing.”  Available:  https://mnfi.anr.msu.edu/species/description/11586/Erynnis‐persius‐persius.   Milko, L. V., N. M. Haddad, and S. L. Lance. 2012. “Dispersal via Stream Corridors Structures Populations of  the  Endangered  St.  Francis’  Satyr  Butterfly  (Neonympha  mitchellii  francisci).”  Journal  of  Insect  Conservation 16:263–273.  Miller, A. E., B. J. Brosi, K. N. Magnacca, G. C. Daily, and L. Pejchar. 2015. “Pollen carried by native and non‐ native bees in the large‐scale reforestation of pastureland in Hawaii: implications for pollination.” Pacific  Science 69(5):67–79.  Miller, J. C., and P. C. Hammond. 2007. Butterflies and Moths of Pacific Northwest Forests and Woodlands:  Rare, Endangered, and Management‐Sensitive Species. 243 pp.  Miller, Lee D., Donald J. Harvey, and Jacqueline Y. Miller. 1985. “Notes on the genus Euphyes with description  of a new subspecies (Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae).” The Florida Entomologist 68:323–335.  Minnerath, A., M. Vaughan, and E. Mader. 2016. Maritime Northwest Citizen Science Monitoring Guide for  Bees and Butterflies. 60 pp. The Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. No date. “Atrytone arogos iowa (Scudder, 1868).” Minnesota  Department  of  Natural  Resources,  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP70012.  Accessed: October 4, 2020.  Minnesota  Department  of Natural  Resources. No  date.  “Hesperia  assiniboia  (Lyman,  1892).” Minnesota  Department  of Natural  Resources,  St.  Paul, Minnesota.  Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/ profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP65190.   Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. No date.  “Hesperia  leonardus: Basis  for  Listing.” Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP65060.  Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. No date. “Hesperia ottoe (W. H. Edwards, 1866).” Minnesota  Department  of Natural  Resources,  St.  Paul, Minnesota.  Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/ profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP65050.  

References and Other Resources  R-23 Minnesota Department of Natural Resources. No Date. “Hesperia uncas (W. H. Edwards, 1863).” Minnesota  Department  of Natural  Resources,  St.  Paul, Minnesota.  Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/ profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP65010.  Minnesota  Department  of  Natural  Resources.  No  date.  “Oarisma  garita  (Reakirt,  1866).”  Minnesota  Department  of  Natural  Resources,  St.  Paul,  Minnesota.  Available:  https://www.dnr.state.mn.us/rsg/profile.html?action=elementDetail&selectedElement=IILEP57020.  Minno, M. C., and M. Minno. 2006. Conservation of the Arogos Skipper, Atrytone arogos arogos (Lepidoptera:  Hesperiidae)  in Florida. p. 219‐222.  In R. F. Noss (ed.) Land of Fire and Water: The Florida Dry Prairie  Ecosystem.  Proc.  Florida  Dry  Prairie  Conf.,  Sebring,  FL.  October  5–7,  2006.  Available:  www.ces.fau.edu/fdpc/proceedings/3‐17145_p.21924_Min_FDPC_d.pdf.  Mitchell, T. S., L. Agnew, R. Meyer, K. L. Sikkink, K. S. Oberhauser, E. T. Borer, and E. C. Snell‐Rood. 2020.  “Traffic influences nutritional quality of roadside plants for monarch caterpillars.” Science of The Total  Environment 724(1):138045.  Mok,  J‐H, H. C. Landphair, and  J. R. Naderi. 2006. “Landscape  improvement  impacts on roadside safety  in  Texas.” Landscape and Urban Planning 78(3):263–274.  Monroe, E. M., K. D. Alexander, and H. B. Britten. 2016. “Still here after all these years: the persistence of the  Uncompahgre fritillary butterfly.” Journal of Insect Conservation 20:305–313.  Montana Natural Heritage Program. No date. “Garita Skipperling—Oarisma garita.” Montana Field Guide.  Available: http://fieldguide.mt.gov/speciesDetail.aspx?elcode=IILEP57020.  Montana  Natural  Heritage  Program.  No  date.  “Uncas  Skipper—Hesperia  uncas.” Montana  Field  Guide.  Available: http://fieldguide.mt.gov/speciesDetail.aspx?elcode=IILEP65010.  Mora Alvarez, B. X., R. Carrera‐Treviño, and K. A. Hobson. 2019. “Mortality of monarch butterflies (Danaus  plexippus) at two highway crossing ‘Hotspots’ during autumn migration in Northeast Mexico.” Frontiers  in Ecology and Evolution 7:273.  Morandin, L. A., and C. Kremen. 2013. “Bee preference for native versus exotic plants in restored agricultural  hedgerows.” Restoration Ecology 21(1):26–32.  Moranz, R. A. 2010. The Effects of Ecological Management on Tallgrass Prairie Butterflies and Their Nectar  Sources, Ph.D. Thesis. Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma.  Morris, M. G. 2000. “The effects of structure and its dynamics on the ecology and conservation of arthropods  in British grasslands.” Biological Conservation 95:121–226.  Morse, R. A., and N. W. Calderone. 2000. “The value of honey bees as pollinators of US crops in 2000.” Bee  Culture 128(3):1–15.  Morton, H. L., and J. O. Moffett. 1972. “Ovicidal and larvicidal effects of certain herbicides on honey bees.”  Environmental Entomology 1:611–614.  Motta, E. V. S., K. Raymann, and N. A. Moran. 2018. Glyphosate Perturbs the Gut Microbiota of Honey Bees.  Proceedings of the National Academy of Science, 115(41):10305–10310. 

References and Other Resources  R-24 Motta, E. V. S., M. Mak, T. K. De Jong, J. E. Powell, A. O’Donnell, K. J. Suhr, I. M. Riddington, and N. A. Moran.  2020. “Oral or Topical Exposure to Glyphosate in Herbicide Formulation Impacts the Gut Microbiota and  Survival Rates of Honey Bees.” Applied and Environmental Microbiology 86.  Munguira, M. L., and J. A. Thomas. 1992. “Use of road verges by butterfly and burnet populations, and the  effect of roads on adult dispersal and mortality.” Journal of Applied Ecology 29:316–329.  Munoz, P. T., F. P. Torres, and A. G. Megias. 2015. “Effects of roads on  insects: A review.” Biodiversity and  Conservation 24(3):659–682.  Murphy, D. D., K. E. Freas, and S. B. Weiss. 1990. “An environment‐metapopulation approach to population  viability analysis for a threatened invertebrate.” Conservation Biology 4(1):41–51.   Narango, D. L., D. W. Tallamy, and P. P. Marra. 2017. “Native plants improve breeding and foraging habitat  for an insectivorous bird.” Biological Conservation 213:42–50.  Narango, D. L., D. W. Tallamy, and P. P. Marra. 2018. Nonnative Plants Reduce Population Growth of an  Insectivorous Bird. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 115(45):11549–11554.  Nassauer, J. I., E. S. Dayrell, and Z. Wang. 2006. Perceptions of the View from the Road. AIMS II: A Statewide  Survey. June. 2008‐34. Prepared for the Minnesota Department of Transportation, St. Paul, Minnesota.  Available: https://www.lrrb.org/media/reports/200834.pdf  National Agricultural Statistic Service, United States Department of Agriculture. 2019. Statistical summary:  honey bees.   National Research Council. 2007. Status of Pollinators in North America. Washington, DC: National Academies  Press.  NatureServe. 2018. Conservation Status. Available: http://explorer.natureserve.org/ranking.htm.  NatureServe.  2020.  NatureServe  Explorer  (web  application).  NatureServe,  Arlington,  Virginia.  Available:  https://explorer.natureserve.org/.   Ne’eman, G., A. Dafni, and S. G. Potts. 2000. “The effect of fire on flower visitation rate and fruit set in four  core‐species in east Mediterranean scrubland.” Plant Ecology 146:97–104.  Nemec,  K.,  Stephenson, A., Gonzalez,  E.A.  and  Losch, M.,  2021.  “Local Decision‐makers’  Perspectives  on  Roadside Revegetation and Management in Iowa, USA.” Environmental Management 67(6):1060–1074.  New, T.R., Sands, D.P. and Taylor, G.S., 2021. Roles of roadside vegetation in insect conservation in Australia.  Austral Entomology 60(1):128‐137.  Noordijk, J., K. Delille, A. P. Schaffers, and K. V. Sýkora. 2009. “Optimizing grassland management for flower‐ visiting insects in roadside verges.” Biological Conservation 142:2097–2103.  Norcini, J. G. 2014. Madison County Energy Conservation Study 2012–2013 Survey of Roadside Vegetation.  Final  Report  to  Florida  Department  of  Transportation.  PR6365252  February.  107  pp.  Available:  https://fdotwww.blob.core.windows.net/sitefinity/docs/default‐source/research‐center/research‐ center/completed_proj/summary_emo/fdot‐pr6365252‐rpt.pdf?sfvrsn=95a9fecb_0.  

References and Other Resources  R-25 Norcini, J. G., J. H. Aldrich, M. Thetford, K. A. Klock‐Moore, M. L. Bell, and B. K. Harbaugh. 2001. “Growth,  flowering,  and  survival  of  black‐eyed  susan  from  different  regional  seed  sources.”  HortTechnology  11(1):26–30.  O’Dell, R. E., S. L. Young, and V. P. Claassen. 2007. “Native roadside perennial grasses persist a decade after  planting in the Sacramento Valley.” California Agriculture 61:79–84.  Oberts, G. L. 1986. “Pollutants associated with sand and silt applied to roads in Minnesota.” Water Resources  Bulletin 22:479–483.  Olaya‐Arenas, P., K. Hauri, M. E. Scharf and  I. Kaplan. 2020.  “Larval pesticide exposure  impacts monarch  butterfly performance.” Scientific Reports 10(1):1–12.  Ollerton, J., R. Winfree, and S. Tarrant. 2011. “How many flowering plants are pollinated by animals?” Oikos  120:321–326.  Olliff‐Yang, R. L., T. Gardali, and D. D. Ackerly. 2020. Mismatch Managed? Phenological Phase Extension as a  Strategy to Manage Phenological Asynchrony in Plant–Animal Mutualisms. Restoration Ecology 11:147.  Opler, P. A., and A. B. Wright. 1999. A Field Guide  to Western Butterflies. Second edition. Peterson Field  Guides. Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston, MA.  Oregon Department of  Fish  and Wildlife.  2016. Oregon Conservation  Strategy.  Salem, Oregon. Available:  https://www.oregonconservationstrategy.org/. Accessed: September 17, 2020.  Ornstein, Robert E., and Paul R. Ehrlich. 1989. New World, New Mind: Moving Toward Conscious Evolution.  New York: Doubleday.  Osborne,  K.  H.,  and  R.  A.  Redak.  2000.  Microhabitat  Conditions  Associated  with  the  Distribution  of  Postdiapause Larvae of Euphydryas editha quino (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).  Ottewell, K. M., S. C. Donnellan, A. J. Lowe, and D. C. Paton. 2009. “Predicting reproductive success of insect‐ versus bird‐pollinated scattered trees  in agricultural  landscapes.” Biological Conservation 142(4):888– 898.  Ouin,  A.,  S.  Aviron,  J.  Dover,  and  F.  Burel.  2004.  “Complementation/supplementation  of  resources  for  butterflies in agricultural landscapes.” Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 103:473–479.  Pacific  Northwest  Moths.  2020.  “Copablepharon  fuscum  Troubridge  &  Crabo,  1996.”  Available:  http://pnwmoths.biol.wwu.edu/browse/family‐noctuidae/subfamily‐noctuinae/tribe‐ noctuini/copablepharon/copablepharon‐fuscum/. Accessed: September 16, 2020.  Pan, A. D., and J. S. Wilson. 2020. “A scientific note on the behavior of the endangered Anthricinan yellow‐ faced bee (Hylaeus anthracinus) from South Kohala District, Hawai‘i, Hawai‘i.” Apidologie:1–4.  Parmesan, C., A. Williams‐Anderson, M. Moskwik, A. S. Mikheyev, and M. C. Singer. 2015. “Endangered Quino  checkerspot butterfly and climate change: Short‐term success but long‐term vulnerability?” Journal of  Insect Conservation 19:185–204.  Parr, T. W., and J. M. Way. 1988. “Management of roadside vegetation: the  long‐term effects of cutting.”  Journal of Applied Ecology 25:1073–1087. 

References and Other Resources  R-26 Patrick, B., and H. Patrick. 2012. Butterflies of the South Pacific (Vol. 240). Otago University Press. Dunedin,  New Zealand. 240 pp.  Patterson,  T.A., Grundel,  R., Dzurisin,  J.D.K.,  Knutson,  R.L., Hellmann,  J.J.,  2020.  Evidence  of  an  extreme  weather‐induced phenological mismatch and a local extirpation of the endangered Karner blue butterfly.  Conservation Science and Practice 2, e147.  Pelton, E. M., C. B. Schultz, S.  J.  Jepsen, S. H. Black, and E. E. Crone. 2019. “Western monarch population  plummets: status, probable causes, and recommended conservation actions.” Frontiers in Ecology and  Evolution 7:258.  Pelton, E., S. Jepsen, C. Schultz, C. Fallon, and S. H. Black. 2016. State of the monarch butterfly overwintering  sites  in  California.  The  Xerces  Society  for  Invertebrate  Conservation,  Portland,  OR.  Available:  https://www.xerces.org/sites/default/files/2018‐05/16‐015_01_XercesSoc_State‐of‐Monarch‐ Overwintering‐Sites‐in‐California_web.pdf.   Perkins,  R.  C.  L.  1899.  Hymenoptera  Aculeata.  In  David  Sharp  (Ed.),  Fauna  Hawaiiensis.  Vol.  1,  Part  1.  Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom. pp. 1–115.  Perkins, R. C. L. 1913.  Introduction. Pages  i–ccxxvii  In D. Sharp (Ed.), Fauna Hawaiiensis. Vol. 1. Cambridge  University Press, London.  Perugini, M., M. Manera, L. Grotta, M. Cesarina Abete, R. Tarasco, and M. Amorena. 2011. “Heavy metal (Hg,  Cr,  Cd,  and  Pb)  contamination  in  urban  areas  and  wildlife  reserves:  honeybees  as  bioindicators.”  Biological Trace Element Research 140(2):170–176.  Philip, K. W., and C. D. Ferris. 2016. Butterflies of Alaska, A Field Guide. Second edition. Alaska Entomological  Society, Fairbanks, AK.  Phillips, B. B., C. Wallace, B. R. Roberts, A. T. Whitehouse, K.  J. Gaston,  J. M. Bullock, L. V. Dicks, and  J. L.  Osborne.  2020.  “Enhancing  road  verges  to  aid  pollinator  conservation:  A  review.”  Biological  Conservation 250:108687.  Phillips, B. B., J. M. Bullock, K. J. Gaston, K. A. Hudson‐Edwards, M. Bamford, D. Cruse, L. V. Dicks, C. Falagan,  C. Wallace, and J. L. Osborne. 2021. “Impacts of multiple pollutants on pollinator activity in road verges.”  Journal of Applied Ecology 58(5):1017–1029.  Pickens, B. A., and K. V. Root. 2008. Factors Affecting Host‐plant Quality and Nectar Use for the Karner Blue  Butterfly: Implications for Oak Savanna Restoration.  Pogue, C. D., M. J. Monfils, D. L. Cuthrell, B. J. Heumann, and A. K. Monfils. 2016. “Habitat suitability modeling  of  the  federally  endangered  poweshiek  skipperling  in  Michigan.”  Journal  of  Fish  and  Wildlife  Management 7:359–368.  Pokorny, M. L., S. A. Dewey, and S. R. Radosevich. 2006. “Getting Started: Fundamentals of Nonindigenous  Plant Species Inventory/Survey.” In: Rew, L. J. and M. L. Pokorny (Eds.) Inventory and Survey Methods for  Nonindigenous  Plant  Species.  Available:  http://msuinvasiveplants.org/documents/archives_cism/ Inventory_and_survey_methods.pdf#page=10.  Polic, D., K. Fiedler, C. Nell, and A. Grill. 2014. “Mobility of ringlet butterflies in high‐elevation alpine grassland:  effects of habitat barriers, resources and age.” Journal of Insect Conservation 18(6):1153–1161. 

References and Other Resources  R-27 Pollard, E., D. O. Elias, M.  J.  Skelton,  and  J. A. Thomas. 1975.  “A method of  assessing  the  abundance of  butterflies in Monks Wood National Nature Reserve in 1973.” Entomol. Gaz 26:79–88.  Ponisio, L. C., L. K. M’Gonigle, K. C. Mace, J. Palomino, P. de Valpine, and C. Kremen. 2015. “Diversification  practices  reduce  organic  to  conventional  yield  gap.”  Proceedings  of  the  Royal  Society  B:  Biological  Sciences 282(1799):20141396.  Portman, Z. M., V. J. Tepedino, and A. D. Tripodi. 2019. “Persistence of an imperiled specialist bee and its rare  host plant in a protected area.” Insect Conservation and Diversity 12:183–192.  Possley, J., S. Hodges, E. Magnaghi, and J. Maschinski. 2016. “Distribution of Croton linearis in Miami‐Dade  County  preserves  with  potential  for  supporting  the  federally  endangered  butterflies  Strymon  acis  bartrami and Anaea troglodyta floridalis.” Natural Areas Journal 36:81–87.  Potter, A., J. Fleckenstein, and J. Feen. 2002. Mardon skipper range and distribution in Washington in relation  to state and federal highways with a habitat description and survey method guidelines. Final report to  Washington Department of Transportation.  Potts, S. G., J. C. Biesmeijer, C. Kremen, P. Neumann, O. Schweiger, and W. E. Kunin. 2010. “Global pollinator  declines: trends, impacts and drivers.” Trends in Ecology & Evolution 25(6):345–353.  Pratt,  G.  F.  2010.  “A  new  larval  food  plant,  Collinsia  concolor,  for  the  endangered  Quino  checkerspot,  Euphydryas editha quino.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 64:36–37.  Pratt, G. F., and J. F. Emmel. 2010. “Sites chosen by diapausing or quiescent stage quino checkerspot butterfly,  Euphydryas editha quino,  (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae)  larvae.” Journal of  Insect Conservation 14:107– 114.  Pratt, L. W., J. R. VanDeMark, and M. Euaparadorn. 2010. Limiting factors of five rare plant species in mesic  forests, Hawai‘i Volcanoes National Park. 151 pp.  Preston, K. L., R. A. Redak, M. F. Allen, and  J. T. Rotenberry. 2012.  “Changing distribution patterns of an  endangered butterfly:  Linking  local extinction patterns and variable habitat  relationships.” Biological  Conservation 152:280–290.  Pyle, R. M. 2002. The Butterflies of Cascadia. Seattle Audubon Society, Seattle, WA. 420 pp.  Pyle, R. M., and C. LaBar. 2018. Butterflies of the Pacific Northwest. Timber Press Field Guide. Timber Press,  Portland, OR. 461 pp.  Quales, W. 2003. “Native plants and  integrated roadside vegetation management.”  IPM Practitioner 25(3‐ 4):1–9.  Quarles, III, H. D., R. B. Hanawalt, and W. E. Odum. 1974. “Lead in small mammals, plants, and soil at varying  distances from a highway.” Journal of Applied Ecology 11(3):937–949.  Ramalho, C. E., M. Byrne, and C. J. Yates. 2017. A Climate‐Oriented Approach to Support Decision‐Making for  Seed Provenance in Ecological Restoration. Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 5:95.  Rao, R. S. P., and M. K. S. Girish. 2007. “Road kills: Assessing insect casualties using flagship taxon.” Current  Science 92(6):830–843. 

References and Other Resources  R-28 Rea, R. V. 2003. “Modifying roadside vegetation management practices to reduce vehicular collisions with  moose Alces alces.” Wildlife Biology 9(2):81–91.  Ries,  L., D. M. Debinski,  and M.  L. Wieland. 2001.  “Conservation  value of  roadside prairie  restoration  to  butterfly communities.” Conservation Biology 15:401–411.  Rightmyer,  M.  G.,  M.  Deyrup,  J.  S.  Ascher,  and  T.  Griswold.  2011.  “Osmia  species  (Hymenoptera,  Megachilidae) from the southeastern United States with modified facial hairs: taxonomy, host plants,  and conservation status.” ZooKeys:257–278.  Rigney, C. L. 2013. Habitat characterization and biology of the threatened Dakota skipper (Hesperia dacotae)  in Manitoba. University of Winnipeg.  Riotte, J. C. E. 1986. “Re‐evaluation of Manduca blackburni (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae).” Proceedings of the  Hawaiian Entomological Society 27:79–90.  Robins P., R. B. Holmes, and K. Laddish (Eds.). 2001. “Bring farm edges back to life!” Landowner Conservation  Handbook. Yolo County Resource Conservation District. Woodland, CA. Available: www.yolorcd.ca.gov.  101 pp.  Robinson, G. S., P. R. Ackery, I. J. Kitching, G. W. Beccaloni, and L. M. Hernández. 2010. HOSTS ‐ A Database  of  the  World’s  Lepidopteran  Hostplants.  Natural  History  Museum,  London.  Available:  http://www.nhm.ac.uk/hosts.   Royer, R. A., J. E. Austin, and W. E. Newton. 1998. “Checklist and ‘Pollard Walk’ butterfly survey methods on  public lands.” The American Midland Naturalist 140(2):358–371.  Royer, R. A., R. A. McKenney,  and W.  E. Newton.  2008.  “A  characterization of  non‐biotic  environmental  features of prairies hosting the Dakota skipper (Hesperia dacotae, Hesperiidae) across its remaining US  range.” Journal‐Lepidopterists Society 62:1.  Rubinoff, D. and M. San Jose. 2010. “Life history and host range of Hawaii’s Endangered Blackburn’s Sphinx  Moth (Manduca blackburni Butler).” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 42:53–59.  Rubinoff,  D.,  M.  San  Jose,  and  A.  Y.  Kawahara.  2012.  “Phylogenetics  and  species  status  of  Hawai‘i’s  endangered Blackburn’s Sphinx moth, Manduca blackburni (Lepidoptera: Sphingidae).” Pacific Science  66(1):31–41.  Rubinoff, D., M. San Jose, P. Johnson, R. Wells, K. Osborne, and J. J. Le Roux. 2015. “Ghosts of glaciers and the  disjunct distribution of a threatened California moth (Euproserpinus euterpe).” Biological Conservation  184:278–289.  Runkle, J., K. Kunkel, S. Champion, and D. Easterling. 2017. Nevada State Climate Summary. NOAA Technical  Report NESDIS 149‐NV.  Russell,  C.,  and  C.  Schultz.  2010.  “Effects  of  grass‐specific  herbicides  on  butterflies:  an  experimental  investigation to advance conservation efforts.” Journal of Insect Conservation 14:53‐63.    Russo,  L.,  J.  Keller,  A.  D.  Vaudo,  C. M.  Grozinger,  and  K.  Shea.  2019. Warming  Increases  Pollen  Lipid  Concentration  in an  Invasive Thistle, with Minor Effects on  the Associated Floral‐Visitor Community.  Insects 11. 

References and Other Resources  R-29 Rusterholz, H. P., and A. Erhardt. 1998. Effects of Elevated CO2 on Flowering Phenology and Nectar Production  of Nectar Plants Important for Butterflies of Calcareous Grasslands. Oecologia 113:341–349.  Saarinen, E. V., P. F. Reilly, and J. D. Austin. 2016. “Conservation genetics of an endangered grassland butterfly  (Oarisma poweshiek)  reveals historically high gene  flow despite  recent and  rapid  range  loss.”  Insect  conservation and diversity / Royal Entomological Society of London 9:517–528.  Saarinen, K., A. Valtonen, J. Jantunen, and S. Saarnio. 2005. “Butterflies and diurnal moths along road verges:  Does road type affect diversity and abundance?” Biological Conservation 23:403–412.  Sakai, A. K., W.  L. Wagner, and  L. A. Mehrhoff. 2002.  “Patterns of endangerment  in  the Hawaiian  flora.”  Systematic Biology 51(2):276–302.  Salvato, M. H.,  and H.  L.  Salvato.  2010.  “Notes  on  the  status  and  ecology  of Anaea  troglodyta  floridalis  (Nymphalidae) in Everglades National Park.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 64:91–97.  Salvato, M. H., and H. L. Salvato. 2010. “Notes on the status and ecology of Strymon acis bartrami (Lycaenidae)  in Everglades National Park.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 64:154–160.  Samways, M.  J., P. M. Caldwell, and R. Osborn. 1996.  “Ground‐living  invertebrate assemblages  in native,  planted and invasive vegetation in South Africa.” Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 59:19–32.  Sanford, M. P. 2006. “Conservation of the endangered Carson wandering skipper (Pseudocopaeodes eunus  obscurus Austin  and  Emmel)  in Western Great  Basin  saltgrass  communities.” Natural Areas  Journal  26:396–402. Available: https://www.fws.gov/nevada/protected_species/inverts/species/cws.html.  Satterfield,  D.  A.,  F.  X.  Villablanca,  J.  C. Maerz,  and  S.  Altizer.  2016.  “Migratory monarchs wintering  in  California  experience  low  infection  risk  compared  to monarchs  breeding  year‐round  on  non‐native  milkweed.” Integrative and Comparative Biology 56(2):343–352.  Saunders, D. A., R. J. Hobbs, and C. R. Margules. 1991. “Biological consequences of ecosystem fragmentation  – a review.” Conservation Biology 5:18–32. Schaffers, A. P., I. P. Raemakers, and K. V. Sykora. 2012. “Successful overwintering of arthropods in roadside  verges.” Journal of Insect Conservation 16(4):511–522.  Schonberg, L., S.  Jepsen, and S. H. Black. 2009. Petition  to  list  two species of Hawaiian yellow‐faced bees  Hylaeus  anthracinus  and Hylaeus  longiceps  as  endangered  under  the U.S.  Endangered  Species  Act.  Submitted by  the Xerces Society  for  Invertebrate Conservation  to  the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  Portland, Oregon. 49 pp.  Schonberg,  L., S.  Jepsen, and S. H. Black. 2009. Petition  to  list one  species of Hawaiian yellow‐faced bee  Hylaeus assimulans as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Submitted by the  Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Portland, Oregon. 34  pp.  Schonberg,  L., S.  Jepsen, and S. H. Black. 2009. Petition  to  list one  species of Hawaiian yellow‐faced bee  Hylaeus facilis as an endangered species under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Submitted by the Xerces  Society for Invertebrate Conservation to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Portland, Oregon. 38 pp. 

References and Other Resources  R-30 Schonberg,  L., S.  Jepsen, and S. H. Black. 2009. Petition  to  list one  species of Hawaiian yellow‐faced bee  Hylaeus hilaris  as  an endangered  species under  the U.S.  Endangered  Species Act.  Submitted by  the  Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Portland, Oregon. 23  pp.  Schonberg, L., S.  Jepsen, and S. H. Black. 2009. Petition  to  list  two species of Hawaiian yellow‐faced bees  Hylaeus mana and Hylaeus kuakea as endangered under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Submitted by  the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Portland, Oregon.  24 pp.  Schultz,  C.  B.  2001.  “Restoring  Resources  for  an  Endangered  Butterfly.”  The  Journal  of  Applied  Ecology  38:1007–1019.  Schultz, C. B., and J. A. Ferguson. 2019. “Demographic costs and benefits of herbicide‐based restoration to  enhance habitat for an endangered butterfly and a threatened plant.” Restoration Ecology 28:3, 564– 572.   Schultz, C. B., and K. M. Dlugosch. 1999. “Nectar and hostplant scarcity limit populations of an endangered  Oregon butterfly.” Oecologia 119(2):231–238.  Schultz, C. B., and P. C. Hammond. 2003. “Using population viability analysis to develop recovery criteria for  endangered insects: Case study of the Fender’s blue butterfly.” Conservation Biology 17:1372–1385.  Schultz, C. B., E. Henry, A. Carleton, T. Hicks, R. Thomas, A. Potter, M. Collins, M. Linders, C. Fimbel, S. Black,  H. E. Anderson, G. Diehl, S. Hamman, R. Gilbert, J. Foster, D. Hays, D. Wilderman, R. Davenport, E. Steel,  N. Page, P. L. Lilley, J. Heron, N. Kroeker, C. Webb, and B. Reader. 2011. “Conservation of Prairie‐Oak Butterflies in Oregon, Washington, and British Columbia.” Northwest Science: Official Publication of the  Northwest Scientific Association 85:361–388. Schultz, C. B., J. L. Zemaitis, C. C. Thomas, M. D. Bowers, and E. E. Crone. 2016. “Non‐target effects of grass‐ specific herbicides differ among species, chemicals and host plants in Euphydryas butterflies.” Journal of  Insect Conservation 20(5):867–877.  Schultz,  C.  B.,  L. M.  Brown,  E.  Pelton,  and  E.  E.  Crone.  2017.  “Citizen  science monitoring  demonstrates  dramatic declines of monarch butterflies in western North America.” Biological Conservation 214:343– 346.  Scott, J. A. 1986. The Butterflies of North America: A Natural History and Field Guide. Stanford University Press,  Stanford, CA.  Scott, J. A. 1992. The Butterflies of North America: A Natural History and Field Guide. Stanford University Press,  Stanford, CA. 668 pp.   Scott, J. A. 2014. Lepidoptera of North America. 13. Flower visitation by Colorado butterflies (40,615 records)  with a review of the literature on pollination of Colorado plants and butterfly attraction (Lepidoptera:  Hesperioidea  and  Papilionoidea).  Contributions  of  the  C.P. Gillette Museum  of Arthropod Diversity,  Colorado State University.   Scott, J. A. 2020. “Butterflies of the Southern Rocky Mountains Area, and Their Natural History and Behavior.”  Papilio 27:1–391. Available: https://mountainscholar.org/handle/10217/200723. Accessed: September  29, 2020. 

References and Other Resources  R-31 Scott,  J.  A.,  and  R.  E.  Stanford.  1981(82).  “Geographic  variation  and  ecology  of  Hesperia  leonardus  (Hesperiidae).” Journal of Research on the Lepidoptera 20:18–35.  Seidl, A. L. 1996. “Oviposition behavior and larval biology of the endangered Uncompahgre fritillary Boloria  acrocnema (Nymphalidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 50:290–296.  Selby, G. 2007. Great Basin Silverspot Butterfly  (Speyeria nokomis nokomis  [W.H. Edwards]): A Technical  Conservation Assessment.  Selby, G. 2007. Regal Fritillary (Speyeria idalia Drury): a Technical Conservation Assessment. February 9. USDA  Forest  Service,  Rocky  Mountain  Region.  Available:  http://www.fs.fed.us/r2/projects/scp/assessments/regalfritillary.pdf. Accessed: August 17, 2020.  Semmens, B. X., D. J. Semmens, W. E. Thogmartin, R. Wiederholt, L. López‐Hoffman, J. E. Diffendorfer, J. M.  Pleasants, K. S. Oberhauser, and O. R. Taylor. 2016. “Quasi‐extinction risk and population targets for the  Eastern, migratory population of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus).” Scientific Reports 6(1):1–7.  Severns,  P. M.  2008.  “Exotic  grass  invasion  impacts  fitness  of  an  endangered  prairie  butterfly,  Icaricia  icarioides fenderi.” Journal of Insect Conservation 12(6):651–661.  Severns, P. M. 2008. “Road crossing behavior of an endangered grassland butterfly, Icaricia icarioides fenderi  Macy (Lycaenidae), between a subdivided population.” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 62:53–56.  Sgrò, C. M., A. J. Lowe, and A. A. Hoffmann. 2011. Building Evolutionary Resilience for Conserving Biodiversity  Under Climate Change. Evolutionary Applications 4:326–337.  Shanahan, M. 2022. “Honey Bees and Industrial Agriculture: What Researchers Are Missing, and Why It’s a  Problem.” Journal of Insect Science 22(1):14.  Shay, K. R. 2014. Pollination ecology of Hawaiian coastal plants. Ph. D. Dissertation. University of Hawaii at  Manoa, Honolulu, Hawaii. 76 pp.  Shochat, E., M. A. Patten, D. W. Morris, D. L. Reinking, D. H. Wolfe, and S. K. Sherrod. 2005. “Ecological traps  in isodars: effects of tallgrass prairie management on bird nest success.” Oikos 111(1):159–169.  Shuey, J. A. 1996. “Another new Euphyes from the southern United States coastal plain (Hesperiidae).” Journal  of the Lepidopterists’ Society. 50(1):46–53.  Shuey, J., E. Jacquart, S. Orr, F. Becker, A. Nyberg, R. Littiken, T. Anchor, and D. Luchik. 2016. Landscape‐scale  response  to  local  habitat  restoration  in  the  regal  fritillary  butterfly  (Speyeria  idalia)  (Lepidoptera:  Nymphalidae). Journal of Insect Conservation 20:773–780.  Simberloff, D., and P. Stiling. 1996. “How risky is biological control?” Ecology 77(7):1965–1974.  Sims, S. R., and A. M. Shapiro. 2016. “Reproductive strategies and  life history evolution of some California  Speyeria (Nymphalidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 70:114–120.  Singh, R., A. L. Levitt, E. G. Rajotte, E. C. Holmes, N. Ostiguy, D. Vanengelsdorp, W. I. Lipkin, C. W. Depamphilis,  A. L. Toth, and D. L. Cox‐Foster. 2010. “RNA viruses in hymenopteran pollinators: evidence of inter‐taxa virus  transmission  via  pollen  and  potential  impact  on  non‐Apis  hymenopteran  species.”  PLOS  One 5(12):e14357.

References and Other Resources  R-32 Skórka, P., M. Lenda, D. Moroń, K. Kalarus, and P. Tryjanowski. 2013. “Factors affecting road mortality and  the suitability of road verges for butterflies.” Biological Conservation 159:148–157.  Skórka, P., M. Lenda, D. Moroń, R. Martyka, P. Tryjanowski, and W. J. Sutherland. 2015. “Biodiversity collision  blackspots  in  Poland:  separation  causality  from  stochasticity  in  roadkills  of  butterflies.”  Biological  Conservation 187:154–163.  Snell‐Rood, E. C., A. Espeset, C.  J. Boser, W. A. White, and R. Smykalski. 2014. Anthropogenic Changes  in  Sodium Affect Neural and Muscle Development in Butterflies. Proceedings of the National Academy of  Sciences, 111(28):10221–10226.  Soderstrom, B., and M. Hedblom. 2007.  “Comparing movement of  four butterfly  species  in experimental  grassland strips.” Journal of Insect Conservation 11(4):333–342.  Sonntag, D., H. O. Gao, P. Morse, and M. O’Reilly. 2011. Energy and Emission Rates of Highway Mowing  Activities. Transportation Research Board 90th Annual Meeting, Washington, DC.  Sovell, J. R. 2018. Pawnee montane skipper monitoring study for the Upper South Platte watershed protection  and restoration project August 2017. Colorado Natural Heritage Program, Colorado State University, Fort  Collins, Colorado.  Spira, T. P. 2001. “Plant‐pollinator interactions: a threatened mutualism with implications for the ecology and  management of rare plants.” Natural Areas Journal 21(1):78–88.  Spomer, S. M., L. C. Higley, T. T. Orwig, G. L. Selby, and L. J. Young. 1993. “Clinal variation in Hesperia leonardus  (Hesperiidae)  in  the  Loess Hills  of  the Missouri  River  Valley.”  Journal  of  the  Lepidopterists’  Society  47:291–302.  St. Clair, A. B., P. W. Dunwiddie, J. B. Fant, T. N. Kaye, and A. T. Kramer. 2020. Mixing Source Populations  Increases Genetic Diversity of Restored Rare Plant Populations. Restoration Ecology 38:313.  Stark,  J. D., X. D. Chena, and C. S.  Johnson. 2012. “Effects of herbicides on Behr’s metalmark butterfly, a  surrogate species for the endangered butterfly, Lange’s metalmark.” Environmental Pollution 164:24– 27.  Starr  Environmental.  2020.  “Documented  plant  and  arthropod  observations  on  Hawaii.”  Available:  http://www.starrenvironmental.com/resources/. Accessed: September 2020.  Steffan‐Dewenter,  I., and C. Westphal. 2008. “The  interplay of pollinator diversity, pollination services and  landscape change.” Journal of Applied Ecology 45(3):737–741.  Steidle, Johannes LM, Thomas Kimmich, Michael Csader, and Oliver Betz. 2022. Negative impact of roadside  mowing on arthropod fauna and  its reduction with ‘arthropod‐friendly’ mowing technique. Journal of  Applied Entomology).  Stevens, L., R. Frankson, K. Kunkel, P‐S. Shin, and W. Sweet. 2017. Hawaii State Climate Summary. NOAA  Technical Report NESDIS 149‐HI.  Stoner, K. J. L., and A. Joern. 2004. “Landscape vs. local habitat scale influences to insect communities from  tallgrass prairie remnants.” Ecological Applications 14:1306–1320. 

References and Other Resources  R-33 Straw, E. A., E. N. Carpentier, and M. J. F. Brown. 2021. “Roundup causes high levels of mortality following  contract  exposure  in  bumble  bees.”  Journal  of  Applied  Ecology  58,  6:  1167–1176.  Available:  https://doi.org/10.1111/1365‐2664.13867.   Sugden, E. A. 1985. “Pollinators of Astragalus monoensis Barneby  (Fabaceae): new host records; potential  impact of sheep grazing.” Great Basin Naturalist 45:299–312.  Summerville, K. S., and T. O. Crist. 2002. “Effects of timber harvest on forest Lepidoptera: community, guild,  and species responses.” Ecological Applications 12(3):820–835.  Svensson,  B.,  J.  Lagerlöf,  and  B.  G.  Svensson.  2000.  “Habitat  preferences  of  nest‐seeking  bumble  bees  (Hymenoptera: Apidae) in an agricultural landscape.” Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment 77(3):247– 255.  Swaileh, K. M., R. M. Hussein, and S. Abu‐Elhaj. 2004. “Assessment of heavy metal contamination in roadside  surface  soil  and  vegetation  from  the  West  Bank.”  Archives  of  Environmental  Contamination  and  Toxicology 47(1):23–30.  Swain, D. L., B. Langenbrunner, J. David Neelin, and A. Hall. 2018. Increasing Precipitation Volatility in Twenty‐ First‐Century California. Nature Climate Change 8:427–433.  Swengel, A. B., and  S. R.  Swengel. 1999.  “Observations of prairie  skippers  (Oarsima poweshiek, Hesperia  dacotae, H. ottoe, H. loenardus pawnee, and Atrytone argos Iowa) [Lepidoptera: Hesperiidae) in Iowa,  Minnesota, and North Dakota during 1988–1997.” The Great Lakes Entomologist 32:267–292.  Swengel, A. B., and S. R. Swengel. 2018. “Patterns of  long‐term population trends of three  lupine‐feeding  butterflies in Wisconsin.” Diversity 10:31.  Swengel, S. R., D. Schlicht, F. Olsen, and A. B. Swengel. 2011. “Declines of prairie butterflies in the midwestern  USA.” Journal of Insect Conservation 15:327–339.  Swezey,  O.  H.  1910.  “The  Feeding  Habits  of  Hawaiian  Lepidoptera.”  Proceedings  of  the  Hawaiian  Entomological Society 2(3):131–143.  Swezey, O. H. 1954. Forest entomology in Hawaii. Bernice P. Bishop Museum Special Publication 44. 266 pp.  Swezey, O. H. and E. H. Bryan. 1929. “Further notes on the  forest  insects of Molokai.” Proceedings of the  Hawaiian Entomological Society 7(2):293–314.  Swezey, O. H., and F. X. Williams. 1932.  “Some Observations on Forest  Insects at  the Nauhi Nursery and  Vicinity on Hawaii.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 8(1):179–190.  Symon, D. E. 1999. Solanaceae in: Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawaii. W. L. Wagner, D. R. Herbst, and  S. H. Sohmer, (eds.). University of Hawaii Press and Bishop Museum Press, Honolulu. Bishop Museum  Special Publications. pp. 1251–1278.  Tabashnik, B. E., W. D. Perreira,  J. S. Strazanac, and S. L. Montgomery. 1992.  “Population ecology of  the  Kamehameha butterfly  (Lepidoptera: Nymphalidae).” Annals of  the Entomological Society of America  85(3):282–285.  Tallamy, D. W., and K. J. Shropshire. 2009. “Ranking  lepidopteran use of native versus  introduced plants.”  Conservation Biology 23(4):941–947. 

References and Other Resources  R-34 Talley, T. S., and M. Holyoak. 2009. The Effects of Highways and Highway Construction Activities on Valley  Elderberry  Longhorn  Beetle  Habitat.  Final  Report  FHWA/CA09‐0925.  Prepared  for  the  California  Department  of  Transportation.  Available:  https://dot.ca.gov/‐/media/dot‐media/programs/research‐ innovation‐system‐information/documents/f0016602‐construction‐impacts‐valley‐elderberry‐ longhorn‐beetle.pdf.   Talley,  T.  S.,  E.  Fleishman, M.  Holyoak,  D.  D. Murphy,  and  A.  Ballard.  2007.  “Rethinking  a  rare‐species  conservation  strategy  in  an  urban  landscape:  The  case  of  the  valley  elderberry  longhorn  beetle.”  Biological Conservation 135:21–32.  Talley, T. S., M. Holyoak, and D. A. Piechnik. 2006. “The effects of dust on the  federally threatened valley  elderberry longhorn beetle.” Environmental Management 37:647–658.  Tania, Sultana Quader. 2020. “Public Perception of Different Planting Techniques using Augmented Reality.”  Electronic  Theses  and  Dissertations.  2041.  Available:  https://digitalcommons.georgiasouthern.edu/etd/2041.  Taron,  D.,  and  L.  Ries.  2015.  “Butterfly  monitoring  for  conservation.”  In:  Daniels,  J.  C.  (Ed.)  Butterfly  Conservation in North America. pp. 35–57. Springer, Dordrecht.  Tepedino, V. J., and Z. M. Portman. 2021. “Intensive monitoring for bees in North America: indispensable or  improvident?”  Insect  Conservation  and  Diversity  14(5):535–542.  Available:  https://doi.org/10.1111/ icad.12509.  Tepedino, V. J., J. Mull, T. L. Griswold, and G. Bryant. 2014. “Reproduction and pollinator of the endangered  dwarf  bear‐poppy  Arctomecon  humilis  (Papaveraceae)  across  a  quarter  century:  unraveling  of  a  pollination web?” Western North American Naturalist 74:311–324.  Tewksbury, J. J., D. J. Levey, N. M. Haddad, S. Sargent, J. L. Orrock, A. Weldon, B. J. Danielson, J. Brinkerhoff,  E.  I. Damschen,  and  P.  Townsend.  2002.  Corridors Affect  Plants, Animals,  and  Their  Interactions  in  Fragmented Landscapes. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 99(20):12923–12926.  The  Urban Wildlands  Group,  Inc.  2005.  Icaricia  shasta  charlestonensis  petition  to  be  listed  under  the  Endangered Species Act.  Thogmartin, W. E., L. López‐Hoffman, J. Rohweder, J. Diffendorfer, R. Drum, D. Semmens, S. Black, I. Caldwell,  D. Cotter, P. Drobney, and L. L. Jackson. 2017. “Restoring monarch butterfly habitat in the Midwestern  US: ‘all hands on deck.’” Environmental Research Letters 12(7):074005.  Thom, M. D., and  J. D. Daniels. 2017. “Patterns of microhabitat and  larval host‐plant use by an  imperiled  butterfly in northern Florida.” Journal of Insect Conservation 21:39–52.   Thom, M. D., J. D. Daniels, L. N. Kobziar, and J. R. Colburn. 2015. “Can butterflies evade fire? Pupa location  and heat tolerance in fire prone habitats of Florida.” PLOS ONE 10(5):1–22.   Thomas,  J. A. 1984.  “Conservation of butterflies  in  temperate  countries: past efforts and  lessons  for  the  future.” Symposia of the Royal Entomological Society of London 11:333–353.  Thomas, R. C., and C. B. Schultz. 2016. “Resource Selection in an Endangered Butterfly: Females Select Native  Nectar Species.” The Journal of Wildlife Management 80:171–180. 

References and Other Resources  R-35 Thompson, D. B., K. McKelvey, P. van Els, G. Andrew, P. Jacoby‐Garrett, M. Glenn, C. Kallstrom, K. L. Pilgrim,  and  P.  A.  Opler.  2020.  “Conserve  the  eco‐evolutionary  dynamic,  not  the  subspecies:  phenological  divergence and gene flow between temporal cohorts of Euphilotes ancilla endemic to southern Nevada.”  Conservation Genetics 21:341–357.  Thomson, D. M. 2016. “Local bumble bee decline linked to recovery of honey bees, drought effects on floral  resources.” Ecology Letters 19:1247–1255.  Thorp, R. W., S. Jepsen, S. F. Jordan, E. Evans, and S. H. Black. 2010. Petition to  list Franklin’s bumble bee  Bombus  franklini  (Frison),  1921  as  an  Endangered  Species  under  the  US  Endangered  Species  Act.  Available: https://xerces.org/sites/default/files/2019‐10/bombus‐franklini‐petition.pdf.  Tilman, D.,  P. B. Reich,  and  J. M. H. Knops.  2006. Biodiversity  and  Ecosystem  Stability  in  a Decade‐Long  Grassland Experiment. Nature 441:629‐632.  Tinsley, J. M., M. T. Simmons, and S. Windhager. 2006. “The establishment success of native versus non‐native  herbaceous seed mixes on a revegetated roadside in Central Texas.” Ecological Engineering 26:231–240.  Tonietto, R. K. and D. J. Larkin. 2018. “Habitat restoration benefits wild bees: A meta‐analysis.” Journal of  Applied Ecology 55(2):582–590.  Topp, H. H. 1990. “Traffic safety, usability and streetscape effects of new design principles for major urban  roads.” Transportation 16:297–310.  Tracy, J. L., T. Kantola, K. A. Baum, and R. N. Coulson. 2019. “Modeling fall migration pathways and spatially  identifying  potential  migratory  hazards  for  the  eastern  monarch  butterfly.” Landscape  Ecology 34(2):443–458.  Tscharntke, T., A. M. Klein, A. Kruess,  I. Steffan‐Dewenter, and C. Thies. 2005. “Landscape perspectives on  agricultural intensification and biodiversity–ecosystem service management.” Ecology Letters 8(8):857– 874.  Tuley, N. C. 1878.  “Description of  a new  species of butterfly  from  the  Sandwich  Islands.” Entomologist’s  Monthly Magazine 15:9–10.  Tuskes, P. M., and J. F. Emmel. 1981. “The life history and behavior of Euproserpinus euterpe (Sphingidae).”  Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 35.  Tuttle, J. P. 2007. The Hawk Moths of North America. Wedge Entomological Research Foundation. Allen Press.  Lawrence, Kansas. 253 pp.  Tyser, R. W., and C. A. Worley. 1992. “Alien flora in grasslands adjacent to road and trail corridors in Glacier  National Park, Montana (USA).” Conservation Biology 6(2):253–262.  U.S. Department of Agriculture Forest Service (USDA USFS) 2016. Tebuthiuron: Human Health and Ecological  Risk  Assessment  Final  Report.  Available:  https://www.fs.fed.us/foresthealth/pesticide/pdfs/Tebuthiuron.pdf.   U.S. Department of Transportation. 2022. U.S. Department of Transportation Strategic Plan for FY 2022‐2026.  April.  Available:  https://www.transportation.gov/sites/dot.gov/files/2022‐04/US_DOT_FY2022‐ 26_Strategic_Plan.pdf.  

References and Other Resources  R-36 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). 2017. Triclopyr: Draft Ecological Risk Assessment for Registration  Review. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution  Prevention, Environmental Fate and Effects Division. Available: https://downloads.regulations.gov/EPA‐ HQ‐OPP‐2014‐0576‐0026/content.pdf.  U.S. Environmental Protection Agency  (EPA). 2019. Fluazifop‐p‐butyl: Draft Ecological Risk Assessment  for  Registration Review. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Chemical Safety  and  Pollution  Prevention,  Environmental  Fate  and  Effects  Division.  Available:  https://downloads.regulations.gov/EPA‐HQ‐OPP‐2014‐0779‐0017/content.pdf.  U.S.  Environmental  Protection  Agency  (EPA).  2020.  Oxadiazon:  Draft  Ecological  Risk  Assessment  for  Registration Review. Washington, DC: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Chemical Safety  and  Pollution  Prevention,  Environmental  Fate  and  Effects  Division.  Available:  https://downloads.regulations.gov/EPA‐HQ‐OPP‐2014‐0782‐0017/content.pdf.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service. No  date.  “Desmocerus  californicus  dimorphus:  valley  elderberry  longhorn  beetle.”  Available:  https://www.fws.gov/species/valley‐elderberry‐longhorn‐beetle‐desmocerus‐ californicus‐dimorphus.   U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service.  No  date.  “Lycaeides  argyrognomon  lotis.”  Available:  https://www.fws.gov/species/lotis‐blue‐lycaeides‐argyrognomon‐lotis.   U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service.  No  date.  “Pseudocopaeodes  eunus  obscurus.”  Available:  https://www.fws.gov/species/carson‐wandering‐skipper‐pseudocopaeodes‐eunus‐obscurus.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No date. E. editha taylori candidate assessment.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No date. Fender’s blue recovery plan.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No date. Saint Francis’ Satyr (Neonympha mitchellii francisci) 5‐Year Review.  Available: https://www.fws.gov/southeast/wildlife/insects/saint‐francis‐satyr/.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. No date. Schaus Swallowtail Butterfly: Heraclides aristodemus ponceanus.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1976. Determination That Six Species of Butterflies are Endangered Species.  Service  Region  8,  Pacific  Southwest  San  Francisco  Bay‐Delta  Fish  and Wildlife  Office,  Sacramento,  California. 41 Federal Register 22041.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1984. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants: Review of invertebrate  wildlife for listing as endangered or threatened species. Federal Register 49:21664–21673.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  1994.  Endangered  and  threatened  wildlife  and  plants:  determination  of  endangered  or  threatened  status  for  24  plants  from  the  Island  of  Kauai,  Hawaii.  Federal  Register  59(38):9304–9329.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  1994.  Endangered  and  threatened  wildlife  and  plants;  determination  of  endangered or threatened status for 21 plants for the Island of Hawaii, State of Hawaii. Federal Register  59(43):10305–10325.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1995. Recovery Plan for the Kauai Plant Cluster. Portland, Oregon. 270 pp.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1996. Recovery Plan for the Big Island Plant Cluster. Portland, Oregon. 202+ pp. 

References and Other Resources  R-37 U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  1998.  Pawnee  montane  skipper  butterfly  (Hesperia  leonardus montana)  recovery plan. Denver, Colorado.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1998. Recovery Plan for El Segundo Blue Butterfly (Euphilotes battoides allyni).  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2003. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants; designation of critical  habitat for Blackburn’s sphinx moth, final rule. Federal Register 68(111):34710–34766.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2005. Recovery Plan for the Blackburn’s Sphinx Moth (Manduca blackburni).  Portland, Oregon. 125 pp.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2005.  Species Assessment  and  Listing  Priority  Form  for Cyclargus  thomasi  bethunebakeri, The Miami Blue Butterfly. Unpublished Document. March 2005.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2006.  Smith’s  blue  butterfly  (Euphilotes  enoptes  smithi).  5  year  review:  summary and evaluation.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2006. Valley elderberry longhorn beetle (Desmocerus californicus dimorphus).  5‐year evaluation: summary and review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2007. Biological Opinion of the Formal Section 7 Consultation for the Clinton  Keith Road Extension Project, Riverside County, California (1‐6‐07‐F‐4357.3).  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2007.  Formal  Section  7 Consultation  for  the Clinton Keith Road  Extension  Project, Riverside County, California (1‐6‐07‐F‐4357.3). Reference Number FWS‐WRIV‐4357.3. Carlsbad,  California.   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2007. Kern primrose sphinx moth (Euproserpinus euterpe): 5‐Year Review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. Candidate assessment for Dakota skipper (Oarisma poweshiek).  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. Delhi Sands Flower‐loving Fly (Rhaphiomidas terminatus abdominalis). 5‐ year review: summary and evaluation.   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. El Segundo Blue Butterfly  (Euphilotes battoides allyni) 5‐Year Review:  Summary and Evaluation.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. Hawaiian  Islands Plants: Listed  species, as designated under  the U.S.  Endangered.  Endangered  and  Threatened Wildlife  and  Plants;  Review  of  Native  Species  That  Are  Candidates for Listing as Endangered or Threatened; Annual Notice of Findings on Resubmitted Petitions;  Annual Description of Progress on Listing Actions; Proposed Rule Species Act. 50 CFR Part 17. 70 pp.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2008. Hesperia dacotae candidate assessment.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2009. Bay checkerspot butterfly (Euphydryas editha bayensis) 5‐Year Review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2009. Callippe silverspot butterfly: 5 year review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2009. Mitchell’s satyr butterfly (Neonympha mitchellii mitchellii). 5 year review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2009. Myrtle’s silverspot butterfly (Speyeria zerene myrtleae) 5‐Year Review.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service. 2009. Uncompahgre  Fritillary Butterfly  (Boloria  acrocnema) 5  year  review:  summary and evaluation. 

References and Other Resources  R-38 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2010. San Bruno Elfin Butterfly (Callophrys mossii bayensis) and Mission Blue  Butterfly (Icaricia icarioides missionensis) 5‐Year Review: Summary and Evaluation.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2010.  Species  Assessment  and  Listing  Priority  Assignment  Form:  Anaea  troglodyta  floridalis.  Available:  https://ecos.fws.gov/docs/candidate/assessments/2010/ r4/I087_I01.pdf.   U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2011.  Lotis  blue  butterfly  (Lycaeides  argyrognomon  lotis).  5‐year  review:  summary and evaluation.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2011. Pawnee montane skipper (Hesperia leonardus montana) 5 year review:  summary and evaluation. Colorado Field Office, Lakewood, CO.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2012. Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for  23  Species on Oahu and Designation of Critical Habitat  for 124  Species;  Final Rule.  Federal Register  77(180):57648–57862.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2012. Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Listing 15 Species on  Hawaii  Island  as  Endangered  and Designating  Critical Habitat  for  3  Species;  Proposed  Rule.  Federal  Register 77(201):63928–64018.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2012. Karner Blue Butterfly (Lycaeides melissa samuelis) 5‐Year Review.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2014. Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for  the  Florida  Leafwing  and  Bartram’s  Scrub‐Hairstreak  Butterflies;  Final  Rule.  Federal  Register  79(155):47222‐47244.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2014. Palos Verdes Blue Butterfly (Glaucopsyche lygdamus palosverdesensis) 5‐ Year Review.  U.S.  Fish and Wildlife  Service. 2015. Recovery Plan  for  the Behren’s  Silverspot Butterfly  (Speyeria  zerene  behrensii).   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2015. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Species Assessment and Listing Priority  Assignment Form: Rattlesnake‐master Borer Moth (Papaipema eryngii).   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2016. Endangered and threatened wildlife and plants: Endangered Status for  49 Species from the Hawaiian Islands. Federal Register 81(190):67786–67857.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2016. Endangered Status for 49 Species from the Hawaiian Islands. September  30, 2016. Federal Register 81(190):67786–67860.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2018. Species status assessment report for the frosted elfin (Callophrys irus),  Version 1.2. April. Cortland, NY.  U.S.  Fish  and Wildlife  Service.  2018. U.S.  Federal  Endangered  and  Threatened  Species by Calendar  Year.  Environmental  Conservation  Online  System.  Available:    https://ecos.fws.gov/ecp/report/species‐ listings‐by‐year‐totals. Accessed: October 18, 2018.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Recovery Plan Amendment for Palos Verdes Blue Butterfly.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Recovery plan for Laguna Mountains Skipper (Pyrgus ruralis lagunae).  

References and Other Resources  R-39 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Recovery plan for San Bruno Elfin Butterfly (Callophrys mossii bayensis)  and Mission Blue Butterfly (Icaricia icarioides missionensis). Region 8, Sacramento, CA.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Recovery Plan for Three Endangered Species Endemic to Antioch Dunes,  California: Lange’s metalmark butterfly (Apodemia mormo langei), Oenothera deltoides subsp. howellii  (Antioch Dunes evening‐primrose), and Erysimum capitatum var. angustatum (Contra Costa wallflower).  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Region 8, Pacific Southwest San Francisco Bay‐Delta Fish and Wildlife Office.  Sacramento, California.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Revised recovery plan for valley elderberry longhorn beetle (Desmocerus  californicus dimorphus).   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2019. Species Status Assessment for the Sand Verbena Moth (Copablepharon  fuscum).   U.S.  Fish  and  Wildlife  Service.  2019.  Transmittal  –  Regional  Forester  Special  Status  Species  List,  with  enclosures. Available:  http://www.fs.fed.us/r6/sfpnw/issssp/agency‐policy/. Accessed August 7, 2020.   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2020. Lange’s metalmark butterfly (Apodemia mormo langei) 5‐year review.   U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2020. Species Status Assessment Report for the Rattlesnake‐master Borer Moth  (Papaipema eryngii). Version 1.1.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2021. Species status assessment report for Speyeria nokomis nokomis. Grand  Junction, Colorado.  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 2022. “Threatened and Endangered Pollinators.” Retrieved June 2022.  U.S.  Forest  Service  and Washington Office  Enterprise  Program.  2019.  Persistence  analysis  for  species  of  conservation concern. Inyo National Forest, Region 5 Regional Office.   United States Global Change Research Program (USGCRP). 2018. Impacts, Risks, and Adaptation in the United  States: Fourth National Climate Assessment, Volume II. D. R. Reidmiller, C.W. Avery, D.R. Easterling, K.E.  Kunkel,  K.L.M.  Lewis,  T.K. Maycock,  and  B.C.  Stewart  (eds.). U.S. Global  Change  Research  Program,  Washington, DC. doi: 10.7930/NCA4.2018.  University of California  Statewide  Integrated Pest Management Program. 2022. Bee Precaution Pesticide  Ratings (and studies cited within): https://www2.ipm.ucanr.edu/beeprecaution/. Accessed: April 2022.  University  of Hertfordshire  Agriculture &  Environment  Research Unit  (AERU).  2022.  Pesticide  Properties  Database. Available: http://sitem.herts.ac.uk/aeru/ppdb/en/index.htm. Accessed: April 2022.  Valiente‐Banuet,  A.,  F.  Molina‐Freaner,  A.  Torres,  M.  C.  Arizmendi,  and  A.  Casas.  2004.  “Geographic  differentiation  in  the  pollination  system  of  the  columnar  cactus  Pachycereus  pecten‐aboriginum.”  American Journal of Botany 91:850–855.  Valtonen, A., and K. Saarinen. 2005. “A highway intersection as an alternative habitat for a meadow butterfly:  effect  of  mowing,  habitat  geometry  and  roads  on  the  ringlet  (Aphantopus  hyperantus).”  Annales  Zoologici Fennici 42(5):545–556.  Valtonen, A., K. Saarinen, and J. Jantunen. 2006. “Effect of different mowing regimes on butterflies and diurnal  moths on road verges.” Animal Biodiversity and Conservation 29:133–148. 

References and Other Resources  R-40 Valtonen, A., K. Saarinen, and J. Jantunen. 2007. “Intersection reservations as habitats for meadow butterflies  and diurnal moths: Guidelines  for planning and management.”  Landscape and Urban Planning 79.3‐ 4:201–209.  Van Hoose, Natalie. 2021. “Scientists discover nest, new northern  range of Florida’s  rare blue calamintha  bee.”  Florida  Museum  of  Natural  History.  Available:  https://www.floridamuseum.ufl.edu/science/discover‐nest‐northern‐range‐blue‐calamintha‐bee/.   Vaughan, D. M., and M. D. Shepherd. 2005. Species Profile: Callophrys comstocki. In Shepherd, M. D., D. M.  Vaughan, and S. H. Black (Eds). Red List of Pollinator Insects of North America. CD‐ROM Version 1 (May  2005). Portland, OR: The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation.  Von der Lippe, M., and I. Kowarik. 2007. “Long‐Distance Dispersal of Plants by Vehicles as a Driver of Plant  Invasions.” Conservation Biology 21(4):986–996.  Wagner, W. L., D. R. Herbst, and S. H. Sohmer. 1999. Manual of the Flowering Plants of Hawai‘i, Vols. 1 and  2. University of Hawai‘i and Bishop Museum Press. Honolulu, Hawaii. xviii + 1919 pp.  Waite,  Marilyn.  2013.  “SURF  Framework  for  a  Sustainable  Economy.”  Journal  of  Management  and  Sustainability 3(4):25. doi:10.5539/jms.v3n4p25. ISSN 1925‐4733.  Wang, T. Y. 2007. A Survey of  the Grasslands of  the Northeast Ridge  (Guadalupe Hills) as Habitat  for  the  Mission Blue Butterfly  (Icaricia  icarioides missionensis) and  the Callippe  Silverspot  (Speyeria  callippe  callippe).  Warchola, N., C. Bastianelli, C. B. Schultz, and E. E. Crone. 2015. “Fire increases ant‐tending and survival of  the Fender’s blue butterfly larvae.” Journal of Insect Conservation 19:1063–1073.  Warner, R. E. 1992. “Nest ecology of grassland passerines on road rights‐of‐way in central Illinois.” Biological  Conservation 59(1):1–7.  Warner, R. E. 1994. “Agricultural land use and grassland habitat in Illinois: future shock for midwestern birds?”  Conservation Biology 8(1):147–156.  Warren, A. D. 2005. Butterflies of Oregon: Their Taxonomy, Distribution, and Biology. Lepidoptera of North  America 6. Contributions of the C.P. Gillette Museum of Arthropod Diversity. Colorado State University,  Fort Collins, Colorado. 408 pp.  Warren, M. S. 1993. “A review of butterfly conservation in central southern Britain: II. Site management and  habitat selection of key species.” Biological Conservation 64(1):37–49.  Warren, R., N. W. Arnell, and R. Nicholls. 2008. “Regional impacts of climate change.” In: Cuff, D. J., and A. S.  Goudie (Eds.) The Oxford Companion to Global Change, pp. 352–358. Oxford University Press, USA.  Warshauer, F. R., J. D. Jacobi, and J. Price. 2009. Native coastal flora and plant communities in Hawai‘i: Their  composition,  distribution,  and  status. Hawai‘i  Cooperative  Studies Unit  Technical  Report HCSU‐014.  University of Hawai‘i at Hilo. 108 pp.  Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife. 2015. Washington’s State Wildlife Action Plan: 2015 Update.  Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife, Olympia, Washington, USA.  Washington  Natural  Heritage  Program.  2017.  Animal  Species  with  Ranks.  Available:  https://www.dnr.wa.gov/publications/amp_nh_animals_ranks.pdf. Accessed: August 7, 2020. 

References and Other Resources  R-41 Washington State Department of Agriculture. 2009. Human Health and Ecological Effects Risk Assessment:  Imazpyr.  Available:  https://agr.wa.gov/getmedia/c7759568‐f7f2‐41e3‐91ab‐7e3cf5395fba/ 2009amechumanhealthecologicaleffectsriskassessmentimazapyr.pdf.  Washington State Department of Transportation (WSDOT). 2022. Roadside Manual. Engineering and Regional  Operations. Available: https://www.wsdot.wa.gov/publications/manuals/fulltext/m25‐30/roadside.pdf.  Waterbury, B., A. Potter, and L. K. Svancara. 2019. “Monarch Butterfly Distribution and Breeding Ecology in  Idaho and Washington.” Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution 7:172.  Weber, P. 1936. “Notes and Exhibitions.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 9(2):145.  Weber, P. G., S. Preston, M. J. Dlugos, and A. P. Nelson. 2008. “The effects of field mowing on adult butterfly  assemblages in central New York state.” Natural Areas Journal 28(2):130–143.  Weiss, S. B. 1999. Cars, cows, and checkerspot butterflies: nitrogen deposition and management of nutrient‐ poor grasslands for a threatened species. Conservation Biology 13(6):1476–1486.  Weiss, S. B., L. Naumovich, and C. Niederer. 2015. Assessment of the past 30 years of habitat management  and covered  species monitoring associated with  the San Bruno Mountain habitat conservation plan.  Prepared for the San Mateo County Parks Department.  Wepprich, T., J. R. Adrion, L. Ries, J. Wiedmann, and N. M. Haddad. 2019. “Butterfly abundance declines over  20 years of systematic monitoring in Ohio, USA.” PLOS ONE 14:e0216270.  Westbrooks, R. G. 1998. Invasive Plants: Changing the Landscape of America: Fact Book. Federal Interagency  Committee for the Management of Noxious and Exotic Weeds, Washington, DC. 109 pp.  White, A., J. B. Fant, M. Skinner, K. Havens, and A. T. Kramer. 2018. “Restoring species diversity: Assessing  capacity in the United States native plant industry.” Restoration Ecology 26:605–611.  WildEarth Guardians and The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation. 2010. Petition submitted to the  U.S. Secretary of the Interior Acting through the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Petition to List the Sand  Verbena Moth (Copablepharon fuscum) under the Endangered Species Act. 19 pp.  WildEarth Guardians. 2011. Petition to list the Euphilotes ancilla purpura and Euphilotes ancilla cryptica under  the U.S. Endangered Species Act.  WildEarth Guardians. 2013. Petition to list the Great Basin silverspot (Speyeria nokomis nokomis) under the  Endangered Species Act.  Williams, D. W., L. L. Jackson, and D. D. Smith. 2007. “Effects of frequent mowing on survival and persistence  of forbs seeded into a species‐poor grassland.” Restoration Ecology 15(1):24–33.  Williams,  E.  H.  1981.  “Thermal  influences  on  oviposition  in  the montane  butterfly  Euphydryas  gillettii.”  Oecologia 50:342–346.  Williams,  E. H.  2012.  “Population  loss  and  gain  in  the  rare butterfly  Euphydryas gillettii  (Nymphalidae).”  Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 66:147–155.  Williams,  E.  H.,  and  M.  D.  Bowers.  1987.  “Factors  affecting  host‐plant  use  by  the  montane  butterfly  Euphydryas gillettii (Nymphalidae).” The American Midland Naturalist 118:153–161. 

References and Other Resources  R-42 Williams, E. H., C. E. Holdren, P. R. Ehrlich. 1981. “The life history and ecology of Euphydryas gillettii Barnes  (Nymphalidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 38:1–12.  Williams, F. X. 1928. “The Kamehameha Butterfly, Vanessa tammeamea Esch.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian  Entomological Society 7(1):164–169.  Williams, F. X. 1947. “Notes and Exhibitions for the Year 1946.” Proceedings of the Hawaiian Entomological  Society 13(1):1–31.  Williams, F. X. 1947. “Notes and Exhibitions: Protoparce quinquemaculata blackburni (Butler).” Proceedings  of the Hawaiian Entomological Society 13:10.  Williams, N. M., and C. Kremen. 2007. “Resource distribution among habitats determine solitary bee offspring  production in a mosaic landscape.” Ecological Applications 17:910–921.  Williams, N. M., D. Cariveau, R. Winfree, and C. Kremen. 2011. “Bees in disturbed habitats use, but do not  prefer, alien plants.” Basic and Applied Ecology 12(4):332–341.  Williams, N. M., E. E. Crone, H. R. T’ai, R. L. Minckley, L. Packer, and S. G. Potts. 2010. “Ecological and  life‐ history  traits predict bee  species  responses  to environmental disturbances.” Biological Conservation  143(10):2280–2291.  Williams,  P. H.,  R. W.  Thorp,  L.  L. Richardson,  and  S. R.  Colla.  2014.  Bumble Bees  of North America: An  Identification Guide. Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. doi:10.2307/j.ctt6wpzr9.  Willis, K. J., editor. 2017. Climate Change – Which Plants Will Be the Winners? Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.  Wilsey, B. 2020. Restoration in the Face of Changing Climate: Importance of Persistence, Priority Effects, And  Species Diversity. Restoration Ecology 365:76.  Wilson, E. E., C. S. Sidhu, K. E. LeVan, and D. A. Holway. 2010. “Pollen foraging behaviour of solitary Hawaiian  bees revealed through molecular pollen analysis.” Molecular Ecology 19(21):4823–4829.  Winfree, R.  2010.  “The  conservation  and  restoration of wild bees.” Annals of  the New  York Academy of  Sciences 1195(1):169–197.  Wolf, Amy T., Watson, Jay C., Hyde, Terrell J., Carpenter, Susan G., and Jean, Robert P. (n.d.). Floral Resources  Used by the Endangered Rusty Patched Bumble Bee (Bombus affinis) in the Midwestern United States.  Wood, E. M., A. M. Pidgeon, C. Gratton, and T. T. Wilder. 2011. “Effects of oak barrens habitat management  for  Karner  blue  butterfly  (Lycaeides  samuelis)  on  the  avian  community.”  Biological  Conservation  144:3117–3126.  Wooley, R. L., and R. E. Stanford. 1991. “Oviposition behavior and nectar sources of the Pawnee montane  skipper, Hesperia Leonardus Montana (Hesperiidae).” Journal of the Lepidopterists’ Society 45:239–240.  Wu, Y‐T., C.‐H. Wang, X.‐D. Zhang, B. Zhao, L.‐F. Jiang, J.‐K. Chen, and B. Li. 2009. “Effects of saltmarsh invasion  by Spartina alterniflora.” Biological Invasions 11:635–649.  Wynhoff,  I.  1998.  “Lessons  from  the  reintroduction  of  Maculinea  teleius  and  M.  nausithous  in  the  Netherlands.” Journal of Insect conservation 2(1):47–57.  Xerces Society and Monarch  Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat  for monarchs: Milkweeds of Arkansas,  Louisiana, and Mississippi. Xerces Society, Portland, OR. 

References and Other Resources  R-43 Xerces Society and Monarch Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat for monarchs: Milkweeds of Florida. Xerces  Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch  Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat  for monarchs: Milkweeds of  Iowa and  Minnesota. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat for monarchs: Milkweeds of Kansas and  Missouri. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat for monarchs: Milkweeds of Oklahoma  and Texas. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch  Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat  for monarchs: Milkweeds of the Great  Lakes. Xerces Society, Portland, OR  Xerces Society and Monarch  Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat  for monarchs: Milkweeds of  the Mid‐ Atlantic. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat for monarchs: Milkweeds of the Northeast.  Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society and Monarch Joint Venture. 2019. Roadside habitat for monarchs: Milkweeds of the Southeast.  Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Florida. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Mid‐Atlantic. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Midwest. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Northeast. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Southeast. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2016. Monarch nectar plants: Southern Plains. Xerces Society, Portland, OR.  Xerces Society. 2017. Protecting California’s Butterfly Groves: Management Guidelines for Monarch Butterfly  Overwintering  Habitat.  The  Xerces  Society  for  Invertebrate  Conservation.  Available:  https://xerces.org/sites/default/files/2018‐05/17‐040_01_ProtectingCaliforniaButterflyGroves.pdf.   Xerces Society. 2018. Managing  for monarchs  in  the west: best management practices  for conserving  the  monarch  butterfly  and  its  habitat.  The  Xerces  Society  for  Invertebrate  Conservation,  Portland, OR.  Available: www.xerces.org.  Yang,  Y., D.  Tilman, G.  Furey, C.  Lehman.  2019.  “Soil  carbon  sequestration  accelerated by  restoration of  grassland biodiversity.” Nature Communications 10.  Zalucki, M. P., A. R. Clarke, and S. B. Malcolm. 2002. Ecology and behavior of first instar larval Lepidoptera.  Annual Review of Entomology 47:361–393.  Zielin, S. B., and Portland State University. Department of Environmental Science and Management. 2010.  Exploring Mitigation Options  to Reduce Vehicle‐caused Mortality  for  the Oregon  Silverspot Butterfly,  Speyeria zerene hippolyta, along Highway 101 at the Siuslaw National Forest. 

References and Other Resources  R-44 Zimmerman, E. C. 1948.  Insects of Hawaii: a manual of  the  insects of  the Hawaiian  Islands,  including an  enumeration of the species and notes on their origin, distribution, hosts, parasites, etc. University of  Hawaii Press, Honolulu, HI. 222 pp.  Zimmerman,  E.  C.  1958.  Insects  of Hawaii, Volume  7, Macrolepidoptera. Honolulu, Hawaii, University  of  Hawaii Press. 549 pp.  Ziska, L. H., J. S. Pettis, J. Edwards, J. E. Hancock, M. B. Tomecek, A. Clark, J. S. Dukes, I. Loladze, and H. Wayne  Polley. 2016. Rising Atmospheric CO2  is Reducing the Protein Concentration of a Floral Pollen Source  Essential for North American Bees. Proc. R. Soc. B 283:20160414.  Zuefle, M. E., W. P. Brown, and D. W. Tallamy. 2008. “Effects of non‐native plants on native insect community  of Delaware.” Biological Invasions 10:1159–1169. 

Next: Appendix A: Decision Support for Compliance with the Endangered Species Act: Listed Pollinators »
Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin Get This Book
×
 Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Transportation agencies can make a difference for imperiled pollinators by managing existing roadside vegetation and designing new revegetation plantings with habitat needs in mind. This can generate public support for the agency and help to mitigate the negative ecological effects of roads.

NCHRP Web-Only Document 362: Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 4: Great Basin, from TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program, is part of a 16-volume series, with each volume focused on a specific region of the United States, and is intended to provide relevant guidance to rights-of-way owners and operators for roadside vegetation management practices that support pollinators, as well as strategies that are compliant with the federal Endangered Species Act.

Supplemental to the document are a Dataset of Great Basin Accessory Materials, a Communications Toolbox, a Conduct of Research Report, and a Video.

All the other volumes are available on the webpage for NCHRP Web-Only Document 362: Pollinator Habitat Conservation Along Roadways, Volume 1: Alaska.

The other volumes are:

Volume 1: Alaska

Volume 2: California

Volume 3: Florida

Volume 5: Great Lakes

Volume 6: Hawaii

Volume 7: Inland Northwest

Volume 8: Maritime Northwest

Volume 9: Mid-Atlantic

Volume 10: Midwest

Volume 11: Northeast

Volume 12: Northern Plains

Volume 13: Rocky Mountains

Volume 14: Southeast

Volume 15: Southern Plains

Volume 16: Southwest

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!