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Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop (2023)

Chapter: 3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body

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Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
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3

Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

LIVED EXPERIENCES AND VISIONS FOR IMPROVED MODELS OF CARE

The second half of the workshop began with an introduction from the session moderator, Anita Glicken of the National Interprofessional Initiative on Oral Health. The session featured several community health workers and individuals with meaningful lived experiences in the realm of oral health. These lived experiences highlighted the impact of, importance of, and considerations regarding proper oral health promotion, prevention, and care for vulnerable populations. The sharing of lived experiences led to a discussion with oral health and health education professionals about how to improve and integrate oral health education to make it more holistic and comprehensive.

The first to share her lived experience was Trina Brown, founder and chief executive officer of NeuroPathic Trainers and DataCivility, author, caretaker, and health care advocate. Brown grew up in rural Virginia as the youngest of 10 children from a coal mining family. She became the primary caretaker for her oldest and closest sibling when, after a lucrative career at a local nonprofit, this sister was diagnosed with early onset dementia. Her sister developed dementia in her 40s and lived for nearly two decades with the debilitating neurodegenerative illness. While caring for her, Brown saw how her sister’s capacity to care for herself diminished over time, leading Brown and her family to transfer Brown’s sister to a full-time care facility. After the move, Brown continued to function as her sister’s caregiver as well as her advocate. For the last 18 months of her life, Brown’s sister could not speak at all, and Brown needed to decipher and convey her sister’s needs to providers in order to ensure that all aspects of her mental and physical health were cared for. Oral health and dental care were among Brown’s concerns. Brown knew the importance of good oral health, which affected everything from what foods her sister was able to eat and thus her nutritional status, to her overall quality of life and, eventually, to her life itself. Brown’s sister passed away from a dental abscess because her care providers did not know how to communicate with her

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

sister in ways that could persuade her to open her mouth and cooperate with a dental exam.

Brown noted that patients in nursing facilities require a different level of care from providers who are trained to work with people who cannot fully communicate, may struggle to open their mouths, and may need special toothbrushes or need to have their teeth cleaned with swabs. Her sister’s facility did not have adequate dental resources in place, Brown said. Her sister’s story also showed how important it is to understand the mental side of oral health and dental care in considering the whole person, Brown said, and she suggested that if doctors felt more comfortable looking in patients’ mouths and if the state of oral health promotion and prevention for people in nursing homes could be improved, patient health would be addressed more holistically. Glicken commented that Brown’s sharing of her sister’s story had provided insights into opportunities to help other people in similar situations in the future.

Next to speak was Ashley Ford with the Healthy Kids Project and Care South Carolina. A community health worker, Ford spoke about the oral health needs of communities, sharing her experience in both community health and oral health working with schools, communities, children, and families. Ford told the story of a young student with chronic mouth pain whose mother had avoided taking her to the dentist. The school nurse involved a social worker who called the home many times, but there was no response, and the child continued to complain of pain. Finally, Ford visited the child’s home and met with the mother. The mother confided in Ford that she herself had dental anxiety, which made her hesitant to take her child to the dentist. Ford empathized, listened, and explained to the mother that oral health is connected to the rest of the body and that mouth pain can negatively impact other aspects of her child’s life, such as how she eats and drinks. Ford explained that maintaining oral health is important for a child’s overall quality of life. By taking the time to reach the mother and engage fully, Ford was able to get dental care for this child and positively affect the family’s overall health behaviors. This story highlighted the important role of community health workers in educating families about oral health.

Another community health worker shared her experience working with Native American tribes in Oklahoma. Angel Martinez-Thornton is a member of the Sac and Fox nation and a community health worker who works with rural tribal populations. She talked about some of the unique barriers to care experienced by people living on tribal land. Tribes are allocated very limited funds to spend on dental care, and once that money is gone there are no additional funds for dental insurance to cover the costs of additional care. Thornton explained that community health workers in these communities help patients navigate their dental health needs and triage between issues needing urgent treatment and those that could potentially wait to

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

be addressed until the following year. Thornton noted the limited scope of care facilities available to Native populations and the complexity of the paperwork required to get a referral to a non-Native facility. She also highlighted additional barriers to care, such as transportation and family structures. For example, elder grandparents who are raising a child may have mobility issues or other challenges that affect their ability to facilitate their grandchild’s care. In describing each of these scenarios, Thornton spoke of the role of community health workers in helping patients navigate complex and confusing circumstances and in assisting some of the most marginalized patients in receiving the oral health care that they need.

The next speaker was Md Koushik Ahmed, who spoke about dental health care in rural Bangladesh. Ahmed described the importance of understanding connections among the mind, mouth, and body. He said that people are more focused generally on their bodies than on their mouths or minds and that in Bangladesh the health care system is structured in such a way that oral health often gets left out. “Oral health care is basically neglected,” he said. Health care in Bangladesh is highly pluralistic, and no one group dominates. Nongovernmental organizations work alongside the government to provide health care. The health-focused groups in Bangladesh have a variety of focus areas, but according to Ahmed, none of them prioritize oral health. If a child has a mouth-related issue, the rural pharmacy, front-line community health workers, or other informal health workers are the first to respond. These providers have only basic training—or sometimes no training at all—in oral health, yet these poorly trained and untrained workers are the first line of defense for oral health needs. When adults have oral pain, they go to the pharmacy for treatment. Only if their initial treatment fails will they see a dental specialist. In this way, dental care and oral health are extremely siloed and disenfranchised in Bangladesh. Recently, Ahmed said, Bangladesh has made progress in training people to serve as frontline community health workers, make house visits, and communicate directly with community members to educate them about health issues. Some community health workers in Bangladesh work on commission, which encourages them to reach more people and more households. They also experience increased social capital from their roles as community health workers. Ahmed said the system in Bangladesh has struggled to provide adequate oral health and dental care across the nation but has worked to create new and innovative strategies to build out their community health teams and reach more people with health education that includes aspects of oral health. Glicken thanked Ahmed for sharing the story with the group and providing an example of a way to expand outreach and education for oral health.

Glicken asked the session’s speakers to reflect on their work with underserved communities and speak about how to meet the needs of these

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

communities, with specific consideration for the mind–mouth–body connection. Thornton responded that care should be proactive rather than reactive and should be focused on preventive treatments. Oral health education should be another key area of focus for the community, including teaching people how to brush and floss and providing toothbrushes. Thornton said that when she works with groups of children, she and her team dress in scrubs to show the children that health care professionals are not intimidating or scary. Thornton recounted a story of a child with extreme dental fear who overcame this fear after working with Thornton’s team and receiving the gift of a new toothbrush.

Brown added that community health workers and care providers could go into schools, churches, nonprofit organizations, and other community hubs to offer dental screenings and education services. She has seen evidence of success with this approach in other areas of health care, she said.

A virtual participant asked the speakers for their thoughts on the potential for telehealth to have a positive impact on barriers to care. Brown said that she believes telehealth could provide a major improvement in access to care within nursing facilities. Ford added that telehealth for dentistry would be a major benefit to the communities with whom she works, as it would increase access for working parents with busy schedules. Glicken closed the discussion by noting that as long as oral health remains siloed from the health of the rest of the body, getting collaboration for holistic health care will be difficult, and oral health will not be seen as an essential component of whole person care.

EXPLORING A NEW MODEL FOR DESIGNING DEMONSTRATION PROJECTS: BARRIERS AND OPPORTUNITIES IN THE FUTURE OF ORAL HEALTH EDUCATION

The final session of the workshop featured a panel discussion on community-integrated oral health projects and best practices in oral health education. The session was moderated by Richard Berman of the University of South Florida and Julian Fisher of the Charité University Berlin. Initial discussants included Michael Glick from the Center for Integrative Global Oral Health at the University of Pennsylvania, Teresa Marshall of the University of Iowa College of Dentistry, and Bruce Doll of the Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences. The conversation was later expanded to include global representatives with community-engaged experiences in oral health. Those discussants included Rita Villena of the University of San Martín de Porres in Peru, Cleopatra Matanhire from the Oral Health for Mental Health Patients Project in Zimbabwe, Lisa Mallonee of the Texas A&M School of Dentistry, Judith Albino of the Colorado School of Public

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

Health, and Jeffery Stewart of the American Dental Education Association. The session began with an introduction from Berman and Fisher.

Berman started by describing the main focus of his career, which has been on the effective translation of scientific developments rather than on oral health. “There is no question that the mouth and the mind and body are connected,” he said, adding that issues of health status are often interconnected with a person’s zip code or geographic location, as their location affects their access to resources. He spoke of the need not just to describe problems, but to actively work toward solutions. Berman invited listeners to consider how caregivers of young children could be better supported in promoting children’s oral health. Fisher then joined the introduction, encouraging the audience and policy makers to place oral health at the center of the global health agenda. Glick agreed, further supporting the idea of oral health having “a seat at the table” and calling for the creation of “oral health in all policies.”

Fisher underscored how the mouth is integral to every aspect of our lives. He reiterated a message from previous speakers, including Mays, that the first few years of life are a critical window for oral health and that it is much easier to create good habits early in life than to correct bad habits later. Fisher suggested that oral health move “out of the bathroom,” beyond the act of toothbrushing, and become embedded into other health programs. He emphasized the importance of collaboration across fields, saying that professionals such as social workers, psychiatrists, doctors, and community health workers could be more involved in promoting and supporting oral health.

On this point, many panelists added their thoughts. Stewart suggested extending holistic oral health education to sectors outside of health care that also touch the health of communities, such as social work and education. Marshall commented that people in underserved communities often engage with non-physician care providers, such as social workers and teachers. She suggested that offering oral health education and experiential learning to these providers could help make them be more empowered to engage in conversation with their clients about oral health and disease prevention. Fisher continued his comments by asking about the need for integrative policy approaches that consider how health affects other sectors and how other sectors affect health. He suggested that teaching people about health in all policies could address the social determinants of health as well as the social determinants of lifelong learning.

Glick spoke about how prevention-focused oral health could be framed for policy makers as an opportunity to improve economic outcomes. He described a meeting that he had with a former governor of Kentucky, in which he learned that explaining the impact of oral health care on the state’s economy, health care costs, and the health of the state’s workforce could be a way to get a politician’s attention. Glick also highlighted the

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

benefits of educating and training dental students on political advocacy to advance oral health policy. To do so, Glick said, one needs to understand what is important to politicians and frame the conversation through that lens. He emphasized the importance of broadening research to include the more holistic framework that had been discussed throughout the workshop and suggested that oral health be better integrated into the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals). Glick then returned to a point made by previous speakers about integrating oral health into other realms of health care. He reminded the group that oral health promotion starts during preconception, pregnancy, and infancy, before a child has teeth, making supporting the health of pregnant mothers and infants a critical window of opportunity. Mallonee elaborated on this point, noting that the focus of oral health policy could be more effective if looked at across the entire life cycle.

Glick closed his remarks with what he acknowledged to be a controversial point, asking if the “right people” are being accepted into dental school, i.e., those focused on oral health from a holistic, prevention-focused perspective and interested in serving the needs of marginalized populations and communities. Dentistry is often viewed as an elite field and an opportunity for wealth accumulation, he said, but assuming that dentistry’s aim is to serve the needs of communities, he posed a question that he termed “a little bit controversial”: “Do we actually accept the right people into dental school?” Perhaps, he suggested, admissions processes might be altered to shift the focus of oral health toward community health and prevention, given that a gap exists between dental education practices and community needs. To help close that gap, Glick said, oral health promotion could benefit from a celebrity spokesperson who could help normalize a prevention-based approach to oral health. He gave the example of a famous athlete serving as an advocate for mental health and said that oral health would also benefit from hearing the perspective of a well-known patient.

Doll reinforced the importance of data in measuring and evaluating progress in the field, saying, “if you can’t measure it, you won’t accomplish it.” Doll added, “if it’s not documented, it didn’t happen.” He then asked about whether the methods that professionals use to approach communities properly communicate the benefits that health professionals intend to provide. Doll suggested creating an agreed-upon value proposition between the community and the health care professionals, and Mallonee further urged that health care professionals involve community members in care planning discussions. Doll underscored the importance of determining appropriate metrics for measuring the successful delivery of the agreed-upon value proposition. As an illustrative example, he spoke about a community in rural Alaska. In this community, he said, it is very difficult to access high-quality oral health care, and many community members simply want to eliminate

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

diseased teeth from their mouths. He spoke of a young woman with decay in her two front teeth, who went on to have those teeth removed. This left her free of disease, but also missing two teeth critical for eating, speaking, and smiling. In speaking about the importance of identifying the measure for success, Doll said, “if the metric is elimination of disease, you get a pretty high score. But if the metric is oral health, I’d say the score is a lot lower.” In telling this story, Doll reinforced the importance of knowing the performance metrics and staying open to routinely reevaluating them.

Marshall, Mallonee, Albino, and Doll spoke about the importance of interventions and messaging being culturally appropriate, sensitive, and realistic. For example, Marshall said, in messaging about healthy eating for oral health, one must consider the availability of certain healthy foods within a community. Mallonee emphasized the importance of meeting people where they are and tailoring health messaging, and Albino suggested learning about a community’s culture and day-to-day lives. She highlighted the importance of asking community members about their values and perceived barriers to success in order to better address the barriers and deliver success as measured by those values. Doll closed the panel by reinforcing the importance of working with pregnant women to establish metrics for measuring the value of preventive oral health care and for educating other community-based health professionals on oral health.

Further expanding the conversation, Berman and Fisher turned to two presenters from outside the United States, who described lessons learned from incorporating oral health promotion and prevention into non-dental health clinics. First to speak was Matanhire, a public health dentist in Zimbabwe who shared her experiences with integrating oral health into mental health, community-based programs in Zimbabwe. She led off by describing a surge in drug and substance use in 2020—and subsequent dental complications—in connection to the COVID-19 pandemic; however, prior to COVID, Matanhire and her colleagues had noticed that mental health patients suffered from multiple problems caused or exacerbated by a lack of oral health attention. She further spoke about the connection between mental and oral health conditions and about the intersection of oral disease, drug abuse, and mental health, noting how mental health patients often have many overlapping issues that could be addressed concurrently. Oral health challenges reduce patient quality of life, she said, and special attention could be paid to understanding the oral health burden of people with mental health challenges and how these challenges contribute to their reduced quality of life. With funding from the FDI World Dental Development Fund, Matanhire set up Transformation of Oral Health Care of Mental Health Patients in Zimbabwe to International Best Practices (Mashiri, 2022). To accomplish this, Matanhire needed to collaborate with mental health specialists and be integrated into their current clinics. The

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

first phase, in 2021–2022, involved a survey that confirmed Matanhire’s hypothesis about the oral–mental health connection and provided details on the sorts of education and training needed to serve the oral health needs of mental health patients. These survey results led to a manual and training workshop. Matanhire is now into phase two of the project, conducting a mental–oral health burden assessment with the intent of scaling and spreading her oral–mental health, community-focused training model for health professionals.

The second presenter was Villena, who spoke about her work in community oral health in Peru. Her program brings nurses and dentists together to serve very young children. The need for her program arose from national data showing that there had been no significant reduction in dental carries in the last decade for children under age 6 and a prevalence rate of greater than 70 percent based on World Health Organization criteria (Castillo et al., 2019). Given the high prevalence rate, starting at 3 years was too late, Villena said. In the strong national Peruvian immunization program, with 92 percent coverage, she and her team saw an opportunity to reach very young children. Villena and her colleagues installed their pilot within the successful immunization program, where the nurses are in charge. This 4-year prospective study was designed for nurses and dentists to be trained to work with infants’ oral health. An oral health card was used to integrate oral health into the immunization appointments. Their results showed 10 percent caries in their population versus 60 percent in controls and demonstrated cost savings through oral health promotion in very young children. Villena reiterated a point that had been mentioned throughout the workshop, saying “it is always better and easier to establish a good habit earlier in life than to try to change a bad one.”

Keeping to the theme of community-engagement and value proposition, Fisher asked Albino to share her thoughts on the importance of integrating health care teams in addressing the social determinants of health while focusing on the unique social needs of individual communities. Albino began by reflecting on her own experiences, saying that when planning health intervention programs and conducting research for Indigenous peoples, the community should be brought into the planning. The community itself knows best what it needs. She then brought up two additional related points. First, it is important to consider the entire lifespan of participants and to address the varying needs of the different age groups being served. For example, while it is critical to focus on the needs of young children, health professionals might also consider that, in the coming decades, the needs of elder populations will overwhelm the system if appropriate preparations are not made. It is critical, Albino said, to embrace new models for oral health providers, including using mid-level providers as a preferred alternative to no dental care at all. Mallonee underscored the importance

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×

of Albino’s messages before commenting on community engagement. She suggested the use of “bite-size” pieces of oral health information so as to not overwhelm patients or communities with too much guidance at once. In her experience, she said, small wins will motivate people to maintain their oral health routine. This harkened back to the earlier words of McNeil, who spoke about the role of integrating tools from psychology into oral health and dental care.

Stewart, in his remarks, reiterated the importance of interprofessional education, saying that education, if designed well, will be collaborative, team-based, and focused on integrating oral health into the overall health care delivery system. He also reminded the group of the importance of continuing to educate practitioners in addition to improving education for students. In this way, the existing health care workforce would become competent in and role models for interprofessional collaborative care, teamwork, roles and responsibilities, and interprofessional communication. He suggested modeling this work after successful programs in other countries, where oral health has been successfully integrated into overall health care, and extending the education to practitioners outside of the traditional health care framework to include all professionals who may have a meaningful impact on the health of individuals and communities.

Berman closed the discussion by highlighting a key point that had been made by prior speakers. He said that to be successful, it is important to keep the person at the center of the health promotion, prevention, and care efforts, and practitioners can meet people where they are and help them achieve their own definition of success. He reminded the audience of the importance of listening to communities and asking them about their needs. Garcia drove home the need for a community-engaged approach to oral health and a new education model. This is a moment, Garcia said, for dentistry to expand in a meaningful and effective way and for oral health to integrate into other avenues of health care, while recognizing the importance of the social determinants of health. Willgerodt added her closing remarks, urging each person in the workshop to use their own positions and expertise to promote oral health. With these words, the workshop concluded, with inspiration that the future of oral health education would be collaborative and focused on overall health promotion.

Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 21
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 22
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 23
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 24
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 25
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 26
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 27
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 28
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 29
Suggested Citation:"3 Envisioning a New Education Model: Oral Health Promotion of the Mind, Mouth, and Body." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Sharing and Exchanging Ideas and Experiences on Community-Engaged Approaches to Oral Health: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27100.
×
Page 30
Next: Appendix A: References »
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Despite the integral contribution of oral health to general health status, it continues to be treated as a marginalized and less important practice of health care. Minimizing its importance begins with how U.S. dental professionals are educated. The National Academies Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education held a public workshop in November 2022 to discuss definitions of community-engaged oral health and its application within, between, and across health professions. Discussions emphasized lifelong learning, the social determinants of health and community engagement, and the development of innovative approaches and models for oral health workforce education and training in a global context. This Proceedings of a Workshop summarizes the discussions held during the workshop.

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