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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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2023 N A T I O N A L C O O P E R A T I V E H I G H W A Y R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M NCHRP RESEARCH REPORT 1057 Enhancement of the Practice for Certication of Inertial Proling Systems Amy L. Simpson Pedro Serigos WSP USA Environment & Infrastructure, Inc. Hanover, MD George K. Chang David K. Merritt The Transtec Group, Inc. Austin, TX Subscriber Categories Construction • Materials • Pavements Research sponsored by the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Ofcials in cooperation with the Federal Highway Administration

NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM Systematic, well-designed, and implementable research is the most effective way to solve many problems facing state departments of transportation (DOTs) administrators and engineers. Often, highway problems are of local or regional interest and can best be studied by state DOTs individually or in cooperation with their state universities and others. However, the accelerating growth of highway transporta- tion results in increasingly complex problems of wide interest to high- way authorities. These problems are best studied through a coordinated program of cooperative research. Recognizing this need, the leadership of the American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials (AASHTO) in 1962 ini- tiated an objective national highway research program using modern scientific techniques—the National Cooperative Highway Research Program (NCHRP). NCHRP is supported on a continuing basis by funds from participating member states of AASHTO and receives the full cooperation and support of the Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), United States Department of Transportation, under Agree- ment No. 693JJ31950003. The Transportation Research Board (TRB) of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine was requested by AASHTO to administer the research program because of TRB’s recognized objectivity and understanding of modern research practices. TRB is uniquely suited for this purpose for many reasons: TRB maintains an extensive com- mittee structure from which authorities on any highway transportation subject may be drawn; TRB possesses avenues of communications and cooperation with federal, state, and local governmental agencies, univer- sities, and industry; TRB’s relationship to the National Academies is an insurance of objectivity; and TRB maintains a full-time staff of special- ists in highway transportation matters to bring the findings of research directly to those in a position to use them. The program is developed on the basis of research needs iden- tified by chief administrators and other staff of the highway and transportation departments, by committees of AASHTO, and by the FHWA. Topics of the highest merit are selected by the AASHTO Special Committee on Research and Innovation (R&I), and each year R&I’s recommendations are proposed to the AASHTO Board of Direc- tors and the National Academies. Research projects to address these topics are defined by NCHRP, and qualified research agencies are selected from submitted proposals. Administration and surveillance of research contracts are the responsibilities of the National Academies and TRB. The needs for highway research are many, and NCHRP can make significant contributions to solving highway transportation problems of mutual concern to many responsible groups. The program, however, is intended to complement, rather than to substitute for or duplicate, other highway research programs. Published research reports of the NATIONAL COOPERATIVE HIGHWAY RESEARCH PROGRAM are available from Transportation Research Board Business Office 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 and can be ordered through the Internet by going to https://www.mytrb.org/MyTRB/Store/default.aspx Printed in the United States of America NCHRP RESEARCH REPORT 1057 Project 10-106 ISSN 2572-3766 (Print) ISSN 2572-3774 (Online) ISBN 978-0-309-69889-4 Library of Congress Control Number 2023940931 © 2023 by the National Academy of Sciences. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the graphical logo are trade- marks of the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, APTA, FAA, FHWA, FTA, GHSA, or NHTSA endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. NOTICE The research report was reviewed by the technical panel and accepted for publication according to procedures established and overseen by the Transportation Research Board and approved by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research and are not necessarily those of the Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; the FHWA; or the program sponsors. The Transportation Research Board does not develop, issue, or publish standards or spec- ifications. The Transportation Research Board manages applied research projects which provide the scientific foundation that may be used by Transportation Research Board sponsors, industry associations, or other organizations as the basis for revised practices, procedures, or specifications. The Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and the sponsors of the National Cooperative Highway Research Program do not endorse products or manufacturers. Trade or manufacturers’ names or logos appear herein solely because they are considered essential to the object of the report.

e National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, non- governmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. e National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson is president. e National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. e three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. e National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org. e Transportation Research Board is one of seven major programs of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. e mission of the Transportation Research Board is to provide leadership in transportation improvements and innovation through trusted, timely, impartial, and evidence-based information exchange, research, and advice regarding all modes of transportation. e Board’s varied activities annually engage about 8,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. e program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individuals interested in the development of transportation. Learn more about the Transportation Research Board at www.TRB.org.

C O O P E R A T I V E R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M S CRP STAFF FOR NCHRP RESEARCH REPORT 1057 Waseem Dekelbab, Deputy Director, Cooperative Research Programs, and Manager, National Cooperative Highway Research Program Amir Hanna, Senior Program Officer Emily Griswold, Program Coordinator Natalie Barnes, Director of Publications Heather DiAngelis, Associate Director of Publications NCHRP PROJECT 10-106 PANEL Field of Materials and Construction—Area of Specs, Procedures, and Practices James H. Greene, Florida Department of Transportation, Gainesville, FL (Chair) John W. Henault, Connecticut Department of Transportation, Newington, CT Xiaoyang Jia, Tennessee Department of Transportation, Nashville, TN Nathan A. Kebede, ARRB Group, Inc. (formerly), Exton, PA; Michael Baker International, Inc., Round Rock, TX Thomas J. Nordstrom, Minnesota Department of Transportation, St. Paul, MN Brian L. Schleppi, Ohio Department of Transportation (formerly), Columbus, OH Kim Schofield, Washington State Department of Transportation (formerly), Tumwater, WA; Washington Asphalt Pavement Association (WAPA), Renton, WA Travis Thompson, Nevada Department of Transportation, Carson City, NV Thomas P. Van, FHWA Liaison

This NCHRP report presents recommended improvements to the practice for certification of inertial profiling systems. The recommended improvements were based on a review of the practices employed by state departments of transportation for certification of inertial profiling systems, and the review and analysis of data relevant to the certification process obtained from a variety of sources. The information contained in the report will be of immediate interest to state pavement engineers and others involved in the different aspects of pavement management, design, construction, and maintenance. Inertial profilers are used by state highway agencies and others to produce a relatively accurate and repeatable measurement of the pavement profile, which can then be analyzed to produce various smoothness statistics (e.g., International Roughness Index and Ride Number). The practice for certification of inertial profiling systems generally involves a certi- fication procedure for operators and test equipment used to measure a longitudinal surface elevation profile of a roadway based on an inertial reference system that is mounted on a data collection vehicle. The practice also stipulates minimum requirements intended to address the need for accurate and repeatable profile measurements for construction quality control/ quality assurance, acceptance, and network-level data collection. Because currently available practices do not adequately address the range of potential applications (e.g., low and high pavement roughness), there was a need to review current practices and identify potential enhancements for possible incorporation in the AASHTO standard practice for certification of inertial profiling systems. Under NCHRP Project 10-106, “Update of AASHTO Standard Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems,” Wood Environment & Infrastructure Solutions, Inc. (now WSP USA Environment & Infrastructure, Inc.) was tasked with identifying proposed enhance- ments to certification practices for inertial profiling systems. To accomplish this objective, the researchers reviewed the practices employed by state departments of transportation for certification of inertial profiling systems, collected data relevant to the certification process from a variety of sources, and reviewed and analyzed these data. Based on the findings of this review and analysis, the researchers identified poten- tial enhancements to the equipment certification process for consideration by AASHTO to incorporate the research results in the next update of the standard practice for certification of inertial profiling systems to provide a more practical approach to equipment certifica- tion while maintaining confidence in the device’s accuracy and repeatability. The report describes the research performed in the project and presents the recommended changes. F O R E W O R D By Amir Hanna Staff Officer Transportation Research Board

Note: Photographs, figures, and tables in this report may have been converted from color to grayscale for printing. The electronic version of the report (posted on the web at nap.nationalacademies.org) retains the color versions. 1 Summary 3 Chapter 1 Introduction 3 Evolution and Improvements of Inertial Profiler Technologies 7 MAP-21/FAST Performance Measure Requirements 8 Development and Revisions of AASHTO R 56-14 8 Report Organization 10 Chapter 2 Review of Existing Practices 10 Certification Process 12 System Factors 14 Environment Factors 23 Summary 24 Chapter 3 Analysis of Certification Data 24 Data Processing 27 Analysis 37 Chapter 4 Proposed Revisions 37 Summary of Proposed Revisions 38 Field Test 43 Chapter 5 Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations 43 Summary 43 Conclusions 43 Recommendations 45 References C O N T E N T S

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Inertial profilers are used by state departments of transportation and others to produce an accurate and repeatable measure of the longitudinal pavement profile, which can be analyzed to produce various smoothness statistics such as the International Roughness Index.

NCHRP Research Report 1057: Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems, from TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program, proposes revisions to AASHTO R 56-14 to enhance the practice for certification of inertial profiling systems.

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