National Academies Press: OpenBook

Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems (2023)

Chapter: Chapter 5 - Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations

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Page 43
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Page 43
Page 44
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 5 - Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27182.
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Page 44

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43   Summary, Conclusions, and Recommendations Summary Profiler certification was originally developed as a provisional AASHTO standard in 2002. Since the development of the original standard, the CPAR report (Karamihas 2005) provided guidance on the development of accuracy and repeatability requirements for reference devices and for inertial profilers being certified. Additionally, NCHRP Synthesis 526 identified that many state DOTs do not use AASHTO R 56-14 for certifying equipment as of 2018. While changes may have occurred to the status of the use of AASHTO R 56-14 since NCHRP Synthesis 526 was developed, it is also apparent from that synthesis that even those who are using AASHTO R 56-14 are not fully implementing all aspects of the standard, such as the incorporation of multiple sections representing the varying types of surfaces used by the state DOT in their construction practices. Also, as evidenced by the limited survey conducted for this project, state DOTs are having difficulty implementing cross-correlation on some challenging surface types, such as open-graded or coarse-textured surfaces. Additionally, the analyses used in assessing the benchmark device (Karamihas 2011) allowed for adjustment of the sampling interval, which is not allowed by AASHTO R 56-14. For this effort, data from the FHWA Rodeos, the LTPP Profiler Rodeos, and from certification practices of four state DOTs were used to review AASHTO R 56-14 and identify potential updates. Proposed revisions were developed based on these data and tested as part of a field test by the Mississippi Department of Transportation. The proposed revisions are provided in Appendix A. Conclusions A series of revisions were proposed for the AASHTO R 56 standard. These revisions include: • Addition of a prioritized list of test sections; • Allowance for sample interval adjustment; • Check on the IRI to be based on the confidence interval of the level of error in the IRI; and • Revised reporting requirements to capture variable levels of cross-correlation. Recommendations Future efforts should focus on developing a standard for the reference device used for profiler certification. Devices currently used do not specifically meet the definition of a reference device identified in the CPAR report (Karamihas 2005). C H A P T E R   5

44 Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems An effort is needed not just in developing a reference device that meets these requirements, but also in implementing the definition in a standard documenting these requirements. The certification data from the state DOTs demonstrate that these state DOTs often have difficulty collecting the reference data immediately prior to collection by the device(s) being certified. Additional effort is required to assess the impact of the time between the collection of reference data and inertial profiler data on observed differences in these data.

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Inertial profilers are used by state departments of transportation and others to produce an accurate and repeatable measure of the longitudinal pavement profile, which can be analyzed to produce various smoothness statistics such as the International Roughness Index.

NCHRP Research Report 1057: Enhancement of the Practice for Certification of Inertial Profiling Systems, from TRB's National Cooperative Highway Research Program, proposes revisions to AASHTO R 56-14 to enhance the practice for certification of inertial profiling systems.

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