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Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework (2023)

Chapter: Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
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Appendix D

Committee Member and Staff Biographies


COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Keith Wailoo, Ph.D. (Co-Chair), is Henry Putnam University Professor of History and Public Affairs at Princeton University. He is jointly appointed in the Department of History and the School of Public and International Affairs. Dr. Wailoo is former vice dean of the School of Public and International Affairs, former chair of history, and current president of the American Association for the History of Medicine (2020–2022). His research straddles history and health policy, touching on drugs and drug policy; on the politics of race and health; on the interplay of identity, ethnicity, gender, and medicine; and on controversies in genetics and society. In 2021, Dr. Wailoo received the Dan David Prize for his “influential body of historical scholarship focused on race, science, and health equity; on the social implications of medical innovation; and on the politics of disease.” His writings have advanced historical and public understanding on a range of topics: racial disparities in health care, the cultural politics of pain and opioids, how pandemics change societies, and the FDA’s decision to ban menthol cigarettes. Before joining the Princeton faculty, Dr. Wailoo taught history and social medicine in the Medical School at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and at Rutgers University, where he was Martin Luther King Jr. professor of history and jointly affiliated with the history department and the Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research. He was elected to the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and is the recipient of numerous other academic honors. As of May 24, 2023, he was elected a member of the board of directors for the Greenwall Foundation. Dr. Wailoo holds a Ph.D. in the history and sociology of science from the University of Pennsylvania, and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Yale University.

Keith R. Yamamoto, Ph.D. (Co-Chair), is vice chancellor for science policy and strategy, director of precision medicine, and professor of cellular and molecular pharmacology at the University of California, San Francisco. He is a leading researcher investigating transcriptional regulation by nuclear receptors, which mediate the actions of essential hormones and cellular

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

signals; he uses mechanistic and systems approaches to pursue these problems in pure molecules, cells, and whole organisms. Dr. Yamamoto has led or served on numerous national committees focused on public and scientific policy; public understanding and support of biological research; science education; and diversity, equity, and inclusion and antiracism. He chairs the Coalition for the Life Sciences, co-chairs the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine Roundtable on Aligning Incentives for Open Science, and is vice chair of the Advisory Council for the California Initiative to Advance Precision Medicine. Dr. Yamamoto sits on the board of directors of the Public Library of Science, the board of directors of Rapid Science, the governing board of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the oversight committee of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine, the board of counselors for the Radiation Effects Research Foundation, and the advisory board for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. He has chaired or served on many committees that oversee training and the biomedical workforce, research funding, and the process of peer review and the policies that govern it at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. Yamamoto was elected to the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Medicine, the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and the American Academy of Microbiology, and is a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science.

Amy Abernethy, M.D., is president of product development and chief medical officer at Verily, where she leads teams in the development and delivery of products that bridge the gap between clinical research and care. Before joining Verily, she was principal deputy commissioner of Food and Drugs of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the agency’s acting chief information officer. Prior to her role at the FDA, Dr. Abernethy was chief medical officer, chief scientific officer, and senior vice president of oncology of Flatiron Health. Before joining Flatiron, she was professor of medicine at Duke University School of Medicine and directed the Center for Learning Health Care in the Duke Clinical Research Institute and Duke Cancer Care Research Program in the Duke Cancer Institute. Dr. Abernethy is a hematologist/oncologist and palliative medicine physician who has authored more than 500 publications. She holds a B.A. in biochemistry from the University of Pennsylvania, an M.D. from Duke University School of Medicine, and a Ph.D. in evidence-based medicine and informatics from Flinders University in Australia.

David A. Asch, M.D., M.B.A., is senior vice dean for strategic initiatives at the Perelman School of Medicine and John Morgan professor at the Perelman School and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He created, and from 2001 to 2012 directed, the Center for Health Equity Research and Promotion—the Department of Veterans Affairs’ health services research center for understanding and eliminating racial disparities in health and health care. From 1998 to 2012, Dr. Asch was executive director of the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics. From 2012 to 2022 he was executive director of the Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation. His research is in the area of behavioral economics and aims to understand and improve how physicians and patients make medical choices. Dr. Asch is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and has received awards for teaching, mentorship, scholarship, and innovation.

Olveen Carrasquillo, M.D., M.P.H., is professor of medicine and public health sciences and associate dean for clinical and translational research at the University of Miami’s Miller School of Medicine. For 8 years, he was director of the Center of Excellence in Health Disparities Research at Columbia University. For 13 years, he served as chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at the University of Miami, where he led a clinical, teaching, and research

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

enterprise of 51 full-time faculty. Dr. Carrasquillo now serves as codirector of the university’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute, whose mission is to drive research translation into evidence-based clinical and community practices to improve the health of South Florida’s diverse population. Since the COVID-19 pandemic began, he has helped lead the health system’s institutional response to COVID-19 and has taken a lead role in community education, including numerous media appearances and presentations to community groups. He is also leading the National Institutes of Health–sponsored Florida Community-Engaged Research Alliance Against COVID-19 in Disproportionately Affected Communities (FL-CEAL). Dr. Carrasquillo is a national expert in minority health, health disparities, community-based participatory research, access-to-care, and community health worker interventions. He is also active in the Society of General Internal Medicine, Physicians for a National Health Program, National Hispanic Medical Association, and Latinos for Health Equity. Dr. Carrasquillo is a board member of the Miami-Dade Area Health Education Center and the South Florida Health Council. He obtained his M.D. from the New York University School of Medicine. He also completed a 3-year internal medicine residency at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center, Harvard’s 2-year general medicine fellowship, and an M.P.H. from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Amitabh Chandra, Ph.D., is Ethel Zimmerman Wiener Professor of Public Policy and director of health policy research at the Harvard Kennedy School of Government, and the Henry and Allison McCance professor of business administration at Harvard Business School, where he directs the joint MS/MBA program in the life sciences. Dr. Chandra is a member of the Congressional Budget Office’s Panel of Health Advisors and is a research associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research. His research focuses on innovation and pricing in the biopharmaceutical industry, value in health care, medical malpractice, and racial disparities in health care. His research has been supported by the National Institute on Aging, the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. His work has been published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Political Economy, the New England Journal of Medicine, the Journal of the American Medical Association, and Health Affairs. He is chair editor of the Review of Economics and Statistics. Dr. Chandra is an elected member of the National Academy of Medicine and the National Academy of Social Insurance.

R. Alta Charo, J.D., is professor emerita of law and bioethics at the University of Wisconsin, and now works as an independent consultant to government and industry on medical and biotechnology ethics, policy, and governance related to human therapeutics, agriculture, species conservation, and national security. She was a member of President Clinton’s National Bioethics Advisory Commission and worked as a legal and policy analyst for the former congressional Office of Technology Assessment, the U.S. Agency for International Development and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Ms. Charo has been elected to the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as the National Academy of Medicine. She is a member of the AAAS committee on science, engineering, and public policy, and has now or recently had consulting contracts with BioMADE, DARPA, Colossal, Conception, eGenesis, Vertex, Johnson & Johnson, Gameto, and Warner Bros. Entertainment. She has also served as a member of the National Academies Committee on Science, Technology, and Law, and co-chaired the Committee on Guidelines for Embryonic Stem Cell Research, the Committee on Genome Editing Governance, and the Committee on Emerging Science and Technology Innovation.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

Hana El-Samad, Ph.D., is founding principal investigator at Altos Labs and professor in the Department of Biochemistry & Biophysics and deputy-director of the Cell Design Institute at the University of California, San Francisco. She is a control and dynamical systems theorist whose work generated fundamental insights into the principles of precise and robust cellular responses through the use of feedback control. Her recent work pioneered real-time measurement of feedback in living cells, synthetic feedback technologies to program cellular function, and theoretical frameworks to quantify biological homeostasis. Dr. El-Samad is founding editor in chief of GEN Biotechnology, and a staunch advocate for the diversification of the STEM workforce. She is the recipient of many honors and awards, including a 2011 Donald P. Eckman Award, and is 2013 Paul G. Allen distinguished investigator, 2017 senior investigator of the Chan-Zuckerberg Biohub, and 2020 fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering.

Michele Bratcher Goodwin, J.D., LLM, SJD, is Linda D. & Timothy J. O’Neill Professor of Constitutional Law and Global Health Policy at Georgetown Law School. She was previously Chancellor’s professor at the University of California, Irvine, and senior lecturer at Harvard Medical School. Previously, she served as Everett Fraser professor at the University of Minnesota, with faculty appointments in the schools of law, medicine, and public health. She directed the first American Bar Association (ABA)–accredited health law program in the nation and founded the first law center focused on race and bioethics. Her primary areas of research span constitutional law, bioethics, and health law policy. Ms. Goodwin is the author of six books and more than 100 articles, book reviews, and commentaries. She is the recipient of the 2020–2021 Distinguished Faculty Award, the highest honor bestowed in the University of California system. In 2022, she received the distinguished Margaret Brent Award from the ABA. Ms. Goodwin was a Gilder Lehrman postdoctoral fellow at Yale University and earned her SJD and LLM (as well as B.A.) from the University of Wisconsin. She earned her J.D. from Boston College.

Anthony Ryan Hatch, Ph.D., is professor of science in society at Wesleyan University, where he is affiliated faculty in the Department of African American Studies, the College of the Environment, and the Department of Sociology. He is the author of Silent Cells: The Secret Drugging of Captive America (Minnesota, 2019) and Blood Sugar: Racial Pharmacology and Food Justice in Black America (Minnesota, 2016). He teaches and lectures widely on health systems, medical technology, and social inequalities. He is a fellow in The Hastings Center, a member of the Health and Social Equity Collective at King’s College, London, and the Sydney Center for Healthy Societies. Dr. Hatch also serves on the Wellcome Trust Medical Humanities Discovery Advisory Group and the Community Development Community Advisory Council of the Federal Reserve Bank of Boston. He is on the editorial boards of Science, Technology & Human Values and the Social History of Alcohol and Drugs. At Wesleyan, Dr. Hatch is the founding director of Black Box Labs, an undergraduate research and training laboratory that offers students training in qualitative research methods in science and technology studies and the opportunity to collaborate with faculty on social research. He earned an A.B. in philosophy from Dartmouth and M.A. and Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Maryland, College Park.

Jianying Hu, Ph.D., is IBM fellow; global science leader, AI for Healthcare, and director of HCLS Research at IBM Research; and adjunct professor at Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. Prior to joining IBM in 2003, she was with Bell Labs at Murray Hill, New Jersey. Dr. Hu has conducted and led extensive research in machine learning, data mining, statistical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

pattern recognition, and signal processing, with applications to health care analytics and medical informatics, business analytics, and multimedia content analysis, with recent efforts focusing on advanced computational methods for deriving data-driven insights from real-world health care data. She has published more than 140 peer-reviewed scientific papers and holds 48 patents. Dr. Hu served as chair of the Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining Working Group of the American Medical Informatics Association (AMIA) from 2014 to 2016, and on the Computational Science Advisory Board of The Michael J. Fox Foundation from 2017 to 2018. She has served as associate editor for many journals, and currently serves on the Journals and Publications Committee of AMIA, editorial board of JAMIA Open, and the External Advisory Board of Vanderbilt University Department of Biomedical Informatics. Dr. Hu is a fellow of the American College of Medical Informatics, International Academy of Health Sciences Informatics, IEEE, and the International Association of Pattern Recognition. She received the Asian American Engineer of the Year Award in 2013.

Lisa I. Iezzoni, M.D., M.Sc., is professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School, based at the Health Policy Research Center, Mongan Institute, Massachusetts General Hospital, and a 2022–2023 fellow of the Harvard Radcliffe Institute. After spending 16 years as codirector of research in the Division of General Medicine and Primary Care at Boston’s Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, she joined the then Institute for Health Policy at Massachusetts General Hospital as associate director in 2006 and served as its director from 2009 to 2018. Her early research focused on risk-adjustment methods for predicting cost and clinical outcomes of care; since 1998, she has studied the lived experiences, health, and health care services of persons with disabilities. She served on the National Committee on Vital and Health Statistics and the Secretary’s Advisory Committee on Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Objectives for 2020. She has served on the editorial boards of the Annals of Internal Medicine, the Journal of General Internal Medicine, Health Affairs, Medical Care, Health Services Research, and the Disability and Health Journal, among others. Dr. Iezzoni is a member of the National Academy of Medicine. She has an M.D. from Harvard Medical School and an M.Sc. from the Harvard School of Public Health.

Alex John London, Ph.D., is Clara L. West Professor of Ethics and Philosophy and director of the Center for Ethics and Policy at Carnegie Mellon University. An elected fellow of the Hastings Center, Dr. London’s work focuses on ethical and policy issues surrounding the development and deployment of novel technologies in medicine, biotechnology, and artificial intelligence; on methodological issues in theoretical and practical ethics; and on cross-national issues of justice and fairness. His book, For the Common Good: Philosophical Foundations of Research Ethics, is available as an open-access title from Oxford University Press (2021). He was previously a member of the National Academy of Medicine Committee on Clinical Trials During the 2014–2015 Ebola outbreak, and was a member of the World Health Organization Expert Group on Ethics and Governance of AI, whose report Ethics and Governance of Artificial Intelligence for Health was published in 2001. He previously served on the U.S. Health and Human Services Advisory Committee on Blood and Tissue Safety and Availability, and he is currently a member of the U.S. National Science Advisory Board for Biosecurity. He also serves on the board of directors for the International Association of Bioethics. He has authored more than 100 papers or book chapters. He is coeditor of Ethical Issues in Modern Medicine, one of the most widely used textbooks in medical ethics.

Debra Mathews, Ph.D., is associate director for research and programs for the Johns Hopkins Berman Institute of Bioethics and an associate professor in the Department of Genetic

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She is also ethics and governance lead for the Johns Hopkins Institute for Assured Autonomy. Her academic work focuses on ethics and policy issues raised by emerging technologies, with particular focus on genetics, stem cell science, neuroscience, synthetic biology, and artificial intelligence. In addition to her academic work, Dr. Mathews has spent time at the Genetics and Public Policy Center, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues, and the National Academy of Medicine, working in various capacities on science policy. Dr. Mathews is an ad hoc member of the Working Group on Data Science and Emerging Technology of the National Institutes of Health NExTRAC and a member of the board of directors of the International Neuroethics Society. In 2020, she was elected as a fellow of the Hastings Center. Dr. Mathews earned her Ph.D. in genetics from Case Western Reserve University, as well as a concurrent master’s in bioethics. She completed a postdoctoral fellowship in genetics at Johns Hopkins University and the Greenwall fellowship in bioethics and health policy at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown universities.

Shobita Parthasarathy, Ph.D., is professor of public policy and women’s and gender studies, and director of the Science, Technology, and Public Policy Program at the University of Michigan. Her research focuses on the social, ethical, equity, historical, and policy dimensions of science and technology, in comparative and international perspective. She has published widely on genetics and biotechnology, intellectual property, innovation policy, and artificial intelligence. She is the author of numerous articles and two books: Building Genetic Medicine: Breast Cancer, Technology, and the Comparative Politics of Health Care (MIT Press, 2007) and Patent Politics: Life Forms, Markets, and the Public Interest in the United States and Europe (University of Chicago Press, 2017). The former influenced the 2013 U.S. Supreme Court case that determined that human genes were not patentable; the latter won the 2018 Robert K. Merton Award from the American Sociological Association. She writes frequently for public audiences and cohosts The Received Wisdom podcast. She has held fellowships from the American Council for Learned Societies, the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and Max Planck Institute for Innovation and Competition. She holds a bachelor’s degree in biology from University of Chicago, and master’s and doctoral degrees in science and technology studies from Cornell University. She has held postdoctoral fellowships at Northwestern University; the University of California, Los Angeles; and University of Cambridge.

Timothy M. Persons, Ph.D., is a partner of PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP, leading its work in the development of innovative assurance solutions for the firm’s clients in artificial intelligence/machine learning, data, algorithms, and other digital transformations to help them build and maintain trust with their customers and stakeholders. He was formerly chief scientist and managing director of the Science, Technology Assessment, and Analytics team of the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO). In addition to founding GAO’s Innovation Lab and leading advanced data analytic activities at GAO, he directed GAO’s science, technology, and engineering portfolio, including technology assessment, technical assistance, and engineering sciences in support of Congress and GAO. Prior to joining GAO, Dr. Persons served as technical director for the Intelligence Advanced Research Projects Activity, as well as technical lead for the Quantum Information Sciences and Biometrics research groups for the Information Assurance Directorate at the National Security Agency.

Arti Rai, J.D., is Elvin R. Latty Professor of Law and faculty director, The Center for Innovation Policy at Duke Law, and is an internationally recognized expert in intellectual property law, innovation policy, administrative law, and health law. Ms. Rai’s extensive research on

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

these subjects has been funded (inter alia) by the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, Arnold Ventures, the Kauffman Foundation, the Greenwall Foundation, and the Woodrow Wilson Center. From March to December 2021, she served as senior advisor on innovation law and policy issues to the Department of Commerce’s Office of General Counsel. She also regularly advises other federal and state agencies, as well as Congress, on these issues. Ms. Rai has served as a member of the National Advisory Council for Human Genome Research, as a public member of the Administrative Conference of the United States, and on numerous National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine committees. She graduated from Harvard College and Harvard Law School.

Kaushik Sunder Rajan, Ph.D., is professor of anthropology, codirector of the Chicago Center for Contemporary Theory, and faculty board member of the Pozen Center for Human Rights at the University of Chicago. He works on the political economy of the life sciences and biomedicine. Dr. Rajan is the author of Biocapital: The Constitution of Post-Genomic Life (Duke, 2006) and Pharmocracy: Value, Politics and Knowledge in Global Biomedicine (Duke, 2017), and the editor of Lively Capital: Biotechnologies, Ethics and Governance in Global Markets (Duke, 2012). He has just completed a book on the politics of ethnography, titled Multi-situated: Ethnography as Diasporic Praxis (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming). Currently, Dr. Rajan is embarked on a research project that studies the intersections of health and law in South Africa.

Krystal Tsosie, Ph.D., M.P.H., is an Indigenous geneticist-bioethicist (Diné/Navajo Nation) and assistant professor in the School of Life Sciences at Arizona State University. She cofounded the first U.S. Indigenous–led biobank, a 501(c)(3) nonprofit research institution called the Native BioData Consortium. She also serves as the 2022–2023 global chair of ENRICH: Equity for Indigenous Research and Innovation, which focuses on enhancing Indigenous rights to develop, control, and govern Indigenous data and supports participation in STEM and in digitally enabled futures. Much of Dr. Tsosie’s current research centers on ethical engagement with Indigenous communities in precision health. She also incorporates biostatistics, genetic epidemiology, public health, and computational approaches to cancer health disparities, particularly in women’s health. At the laboratory bench, she developed and patented a combined targeted ultrasound imaging and chemotherapeutic drug delivery device for treating early metastases in cancer.

NAM FELLOWS

Gilbert S. Omenn Fellowship

Andrew A. Gonzalez, M.D., J.D., M.P.H., is assistant professor of surgery at the Indiana University School of Medicine. He is also associate director for data science and research scientist at the Center for Health Services Research of the Regenstrief Institute, Inc. Dr. Gonzalez is interested in novel uses of technology to improve patient outcomes. His current early career development project seeks to apply artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning toward optimizing outcomes and value in peripheral arterial disease. Specifically, he is exploring three lines of research: (1) creation of a cloud-based platform to organize and analyze structured and unstructured data from the electronic health record, imaging systems, and wearables for clinical implementation and research data curation; (2) development of “doctor in the middle” paradigms for health care AI implementation; and (3) development of best practices for identifying and addressing bias in health care AI algorithms. His clinical

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×

interests are limb optimization in the setting of chronic limb-threatening ischemia, advanced aortic interventions, and vascular trauma. Dr. Gonzalez earned his M.D., M.P.H., and B.S. from the University of Illinois at Chicago and his J.D. from the John Marshall Law School. He completed his residency at the University of Illinois and held a National Institutes of Health (T32) postdoctoral research fellowship in the Center for Healthcare Outcomes & Policy at the University of Michigan’s Institute for Healthcare Policy & Innovation.

James C. Puffer, M.D./American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) Fellowship

Steven Lin, M.D., is clinical associate professor and vice chief of technology innovation in the Division of Primary Care and Population Health at Stanford University School of Medicine. He is founder and executive director of the Stanford Healthcare AI Applied Research Team (HEA3RT). His research focus is at the intersection of health services innovation, digital health, and emerging technologies—specifically artificial intelligence and machine learning. Dr. Lin is the author of more than 350 scholarly works and conference presentations. He earned his M.D. from Stanford University and completed his training at Stanford’s family medicine residency program at O’Connor Hospital.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
Page 224
Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix D: Committee Member and Staff Biographies." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and National Academy of Medicine. 2023. Toward Equitable Innovation in Health and Medicine: A Framework. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27184.
×
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Advances in biomedical science, data science, engineering, and technology are leading to high-pace innovation with potential to transform health and medicine. These innovations simultaneously raise important ethical and social issues, including how to fairly distribute their benefits and risks. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine, in collaboration with the National Academy of Medicine, established the Committee on Creating a Framework for Emerging Science, Technology, and Innovation in Health and Medicine to provide leadership and engage broad communities in developing a framework for aligning the development and use of transformative technologies with ethical and equitable principles. The committees resulting report describes a governance framework for decisions throughout the innovation life cycle to advance equitable innovation and support an ecosystem that is more responsive to the needs of a broader range of individuals and is better able to recognize and address inequities as they arise.

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