National Academies Press: OpenBook
Page i
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R1
Page ii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R2
Page iii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R3
Page iv
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R4
Page v
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R5
Page vi
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R6
Page vii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R7
Page viii
Suggested Citation:"Front Matter." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27222.
×
Page R8

Below is the uncorrected machine-read text of this chapter, intended to provide our own search engines and external engines with highly rich, chapter-representative searchable text of each book. Because it is UNCORRECTED material, please consider the following text as a useful but insufficient proxy for the authoritative book pages.

2023 BE H AVIORAL TRAFF IC SA FETY COOPERAT IVE RESEARCH PROGRA M BTSCRP RESEARCH REPORT 7 Research sponsored by the Governors Highway Safety Association and National Highway Trafc Safety Administration Subscriber Categories Operations and Trafc Management • Planning and Forecasting • Safety and Human Factors Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Trafc Safety GUIDE AND TOOLKIT Richard Denbow Danena Gaines Ryan Klitzsch Kensington Little Cambridge Systematics, Inc. Raleigh, NC Stefanie Brodie Toole Design Group Silver Spring, MD

BEHAVIORAL TRAFFIC SAFETY COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM Since the widespread introduction of motor vehicles more than a century ago, crashes involving their operation remain a significant public health concern. While there have been enormous improvements in highway design and construction, as well as motor vehicle safety, which have been instrumental in lowering the rate of crashes per mil- lion miles in the United States, more than 35,000 people die every year in motor vehicle crashes. In far too many cases, the root causes of the crashes are the unsafe behaviors of motor vehicle operators, cyclists, and pedestrians. Understanding human behaviors and developing effective countermeasures to unsafe ones is difficult and remains a major weak- ness in our traffic safety efforts. The Behavioral Traffic Safety Cooperative Research Program (BTSCRP) develops practical solutions to save lives, prevent injuries, and reduce costs of road traffic crashes associated with unsafe behav- iors. BTSCRP is a forum for coordinated and collaborative research efforts. It is managed by the Transportation Research Board (TRB) under the direction and oversight of the Governors Highway Safety Association (GHSA) with funding provided by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA). Funding for the program was originally established in Moving Ahead for Progress in the 21st Century (MAP-21), Subsection 402(c), which created the National Cooperative Research and Evaluation Program (NCREP). Fixing America’s Surface Transportation (FAST) Act continued the program. In 2017, GHSA entered into an agreement with TRB to manage the research activities, with the program name changed to Behavioral Traf- fic Safety Cooperative Research Program. The GHSA Executive Board serves as the governing board for the BTSCRP. The Board consists of officers, representatives of the 10 NHTSA regions, and committee and task force chairs. The Research Committee Chair appoints committee members who recommend projects for funding and provide oversight for the activities of BTSCRP. Its ultimate goal is to oversee a quality research program that is committed to addressing research issues facing State Highway Safety Offices. The Executive Board meets annually to approve research projects. Each selected project is assigned to a panel, appointed by TRB, which provides technical guidance and counsel throughout the life of the project. The majority of panel members rep- resent the intended users of the research projects and have an important role in helping to implement the results. BTSCRP produces a series of research reports and other products such as guidebooks for practitio- ners. Primary emphasis is placed on disseminating BTSCRP results to the intended users of the research: State Highway Safety Offices and their constituents. BTSCRP RESEARCH REPORT 7 Project BTS-06 ISSN 2766-5976 (Print) ISSN 2766-5984 (Online) ISBN 978-0-309-69896-2 Library of Congress Control Number 2023942662 © 2023 by the National Academy of Sciences. National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine and the graphical logo are trade- marks of the National Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. COPYRIGHT INFORMATION Authors herein are responsible for the authenticity of their materials and for obtaining written permissions from publishers or persons who own the copyright to any previously published or copyrighted material used herein. Cooperative Research Programs (CRP) grants permission to reproduce material in this publication for classroom and not-for-profit purposes. Permission is given with the understanding that none of the material will be used to imply TRB, AASHTO, APTA, FAA, FHWA, FTA, GHSA, or NHTSA endorsement of a particular product, method, or practice. It is expected that those reproducing the material in this document for educational and not-for-profit uses will give appropriate acknowledgment of the source of any reprinted or reproduced material. For other uses of the material, request permission from CRP. NOTICE The research report was reviewed by the technical panel and accepted for publication according to procedures established and overseen by the Transportation Research Board and approved by the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. The opinions and conclusions expressed or implied in this report are those of the researchers who performed the research and are not necessarily those of the Transporta- tion Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; or the program sponsors. The Transportation Research Board does not develop, issue, or publish standards or spec- ifications. The Transportation Research Board manages applied research projects which provide the scientific foundation that may be used by Transportation Research Board sponsors, industry associations, or other organizations as the basis for revised practices, procedures, or specifications. The Transportation Research Board; the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine; and the sponsors of the Behavioral Traffic Safety Cooperative Research Program do not endorse products or manufacturers. Trade or manufacturers’ names or logos appear herein solely because they are considered essential to the object of the report. Published research reports of the BEHAVIORAL TRAFFIC SAFETY COOPERATIVE RESEARCH PROGRAM are available from Transportation Research Board Business Office 500 Fifth Street, NW Washington, DC 20001 and can be ordered through the Internet by going to https://www.mytrb.org/MyTRB/Store/default.aspx Printed in the United States of America

e National Academy of Sciences was established in 1863 by an Act of Congress, signed by President Lincoln, as a private, non- governmental institution to advise the nation on issues related to science and technology. Members are elected by their peers for outstanding contributions to research. Dr. Marcia McNutt is president. e National Academy of Engineering was established in 1964 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to bring the practices of engineering to advising the nation. Members are elected by their peers for extraordinary contributions to engineering. Dr. John L. Anderson is president. e National Academy of Medicine (formerly the Institute of Medicine) was established in 1970 under the charter of the National Academy of Sciences to advise the nation on medical and health issues. Members are elected by their peers for distinguished contributions to medicine and health. Dr. Victor J. Dzau is president. e three Academies work together as the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to provide independent, objective analysis and advice to the nation and conduct other activities to solve complex problems and inform public policy decisions. e National Academies also encourage education and research, recognize outstanding contributions to knowledge, and increase public understanding in matters of science, engineering, and medicine. Learn more about the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine at www.nationalacademies.org. e Transportation Research Board is one of seven major programs of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. e mission of the Transportation Research Board is to provide leadership in transportation improvements and innovation through trusted, timely, impartial, and evidence-based information exchange, research, and advice regarding all modes of transportation. e Board’s varied activities annually engage about 8,000 engineers, scientists, and other transportation researchers and practitioners from the public and private sectors and academia, all of whom contribute their expertise in the public interest. e program is supported by state transportation departments, federal agencies including the component administrations of the U.S. Department of Transportation, and other organizations and individuals interested in the development of transportation. Learn more about the Transportation Research Board at www.TRB.org.

AUTHOR ACKNOWLEDGMENTS The research conducted for this project was performed under BTSCRP Project 06, “MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety,” by Cambridge Systematics, Inc. and Toole Design Group. Cambridge Systematics was the prime contractor for this project with Toole Design Group serving as a sub-contractor. Richard Denbow, Cambridge Systematics, Inc., was the Principal Investigator. The other authors of this report are Danena Gaines, Ryan Klitzsch, and Kensington Little with Cambridge Systematics, Inc. and Stefanie Brodie with Toole Design Group. C O O P E R A T I V E R E S E A R C H P R O G R A M S CRP STAFF FOR BTSCRP RESEARCH REPORT 7 Waseem Dekelbab, Deputy Director, Cooperative Research Programs Richard Retting, Senior Program Officer Dajaih Bias-Johnson, Senior Program Assistant Natalie Barnes, Director of Publications Heather DiAngelis, Associate Director of Publications Hilary Freer, Senior Editor BTSCRP PROJECT BTS-06 PANEL Edica Esqueda, Washington State Traffic Safety Commission, Olympia, WA (Chair) Osama A. Abaza, University of Alaska, Anchorage, Anchorage, AK Andrew H. Ceifetz, WSP, Walled Lake, MI Eric J. Fitzsimmons, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS Parry Frank, Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP), Chicago, IL Lisa A. Freeman, Louisiana Highway Safety Commission, Baton Rouge, LA Peter C. Martin, CDM Smith, San Francisco, CA Kristie L. Johnson, NHTSA Liaison

BTSCRP Research Report 7 presents evidence-based information and tools to help improve coordination between state highway safety offices (SHSOs) and metropolitan planning orga- nizations (MPOs) on behavioral traffic safety. This publication will be of interest to SHSOs, MPOs, state DOTs, and other stakeholders concerned with improving traffic safety. SHSOs manage behavioral traffic safety programs at the state level. At the regional level, MPOs develop safety performance measures and targets. All states have one or more MPOs that are responsible for providing planning and administering funds in urbanized areas with at least 50,000 people. Behavioral traffic safety could be greatly enhanced by increased engage- ment between SHSOs and MPOs. The latter understand the regional transportation network, can obtain and analyze local crash data, may have the means and skills to develop transporta- tion safety plans, and have connections to local decisionmakers who can fund and implement investments. Progress toward reducing the frequency and severity of traffic crashes can be better accomplished if SHSOs and MPOs work together on regional and local safety needs. Such collaboration could result in better use of local and regional resources and more effec- tively address behavioral traffic safety issues. In BTSCRP Project BTS-06, “MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety,” Cambridge Systematics Inc., was asked to develop guidance for MPOs and SHSOs to improve coordination on local and regional behavioral safety efforts to reduce the frequency and severity of traffic crashes. The research team (1) conducted a literature review to summarize publicly available data and scholarly works documenting the existing conditions, inciting factors, and lessons learned associated with MPO and SHSO coordination; (2) conducted surveys and interviews to assess the level of coordination between MPOs and SHSOs in terms of the behavioral safety outcomes achieved along with opportunities to enhance coordination and collaboration; (3) performed data analysis; and (4) prepared final deliv- erables, including case studies and a toolkit to help improve coordination between SHSOs and MPOs on behavioral traffic safety. In addition to the guide and Toolkit, published as BTSCRP Research Report 7, documentation of the overall research effort is available as the contractor’s final report, which is available on the National Academies Press website (nap.nationalacademies.org) by searching for BTSCRP Research Report 7: Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit. F O R E W O R D By Richard Retting Staff Officer Transportation Research Board

1 Chapter 1 Introduction and Purpose 1 1.1 Purpose 2 1.2 Target Audience 2 1.3 SHSO and MPO Roles 3 1.4 Benefits of SHSO and MPO Coordination 4 1.5 Current Traffic Safety Context 5 1.6 How to Use this Guide and Toolkit 6 Chapter 2 Opportunities to Enhance Collaboration 6 2.1 Level 1: Ad hoc Communication 9 2.2 Level 2: Periodic Communication Around Existing Processes 11 2.3 Level 3: Staff-Developed Collaborative Processes 12 2.4 Level 4: Sustained and Ongoing Collaboration and Coordination 15 2.5 Chapter Summary 16 Chapter 3 SHSO and MPO Collaboration Case Studies 16 3.1 New York State Association of MPOs Safety Working Group and the NY Governor’s Traffic Safety Committee Collaboration 19 3.2 Baltimore Metropolitan Council and the Maryland Highway Safety Office 21 3.3 Mid-America Regional Council (MARC) and Kansas Traffic Safety Section 25 3.4 Southern California Association of Governments (SCAG) and the California OTS 28 Chapter 4 MPO Primer 29 4.1 MPO Requirements 30 4.2 Associated Plans and Decision-Making Processes 30 4.3 Funding 30 4.4 MPO Governance and Staffing 32 Chapter 5 SHSO Highway Safety Planning Primer 32 5.1 Highway Safety Planning Requirements 34 5.2 Associated Plans and Processes 34 5.3 Safety Programs 36 5.4 Funding 36 5.5 SHSO Staff Organization 36 5.6 SHSO Funding Programs 39 Chapter 6 Collaboration Toolkit 39 6.1 Sample Meeting Agenda for SHSO and MPO Introduction 39 6.2 Resources on Behavioral Safety 40 6.3 FAQs on MPO Technical Committees 40 6.4 FAQs on SHSO Stakeholder Groups C O N T E N T S

40 6.5 Sample Outline for PowerPoint Presentation on Regional Safety Challenges and Opportunities to Align Goals 41 6.6 Sample Goals and Objectives that Focus on Behavioral Safety 42 6.7 Tips for Effectively Communicating Safety with Decisionmakers and Elected Officials 43 6.8 Glossary 45 Chapter 7 Summary 46 References Note: Photographs, figures, and tables in this report may have been converted from color to grayscale for printing. The electronic version of the report (posted on the web at nap.nationalacademies.org) retains the color versions.

Next: Chapter 1 - Introduction and Purpose »
Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit Get This Book
×
 Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

State highway safety offices (SHSOs) manage behavioral traffic safety programs at the state level. At the regional level, metropolitan planning organizations (MPOs) develop safety performance measures and targets.

BTSCRP Research Report 7: Improving MPO and SHSO Coordination on Behavioral Traffic Safety: Guide and Toolkit, from TRB's Behavioral Traffic Safety Cooperative Research Program, presents evidence-based information and tools to help improve coordination between SHSOs and MPOs on behavioral traffic safety.

Supplemental to the report is a research results document.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!