National Academies Press: OpenBook
« Previous: 5 Infrastructure and Supports for Youth Leadership and Engagement
Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×

6

Closing Discussion

The closing panel included Baxter and members of the planning committee who had participated in earlier sessions along with Teal VanLanen, a co-founder of Kinect M1. Baxter said that the day had been “a bit of a roller coaster of hope, despair, opportunity, constraints.” He repeated the workshop’s objectives—“to underscore the power of young people, to understand the barriers to their building power, and explore the approaches to increasing their power to achieve health, equity, and well-being”—and he then asked panelists to point out what stood out to them from the day’s discussions or what they thought had been overlooked during the earlier conversations.

Zhang said that what had most stood out to her was the need for more data on what is and is not working in efforts to increase the power of young people as well as the need to understand the political climate and take advantage of it. Acknowledging the last panel, Yu emphasized the need to further examine what works in building the infrastructure needed to bring youth involvement to scale. Johnson said that what stood out to him was “persistence and love.” VanLanen echoed Williams’s earlier call to “do what you say you are going to do” and added an additional call to “find those things that are working.” VanLanen said that “we each have a piece to the puzzle in this room . . . [and] it is time to put our puzzle pieces together . . . and spread these things nationwide.”

Terriquez said one thing had been missing from the discussion, although it had been alluded to—understanding “how to prepare our young people to assume leadership in our institutions, not just be a voice

Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×

in them.” Todres mentioned another missing element, which was institutional incentives. “It is not enough just to ask people to change,” he said. “We have to address their incentives.” He then added the positive takeaways, including that youth are experts and should be introduced as such and that “meeting young people where they are . . . needs to be a part of our mantra.” Garcel said that her key takeaways were “creating spaces for healing for our young people and the concept of youth as experts.”

Baxter then posed a final question for the planning committee, noting that the day’s discussion about the infrastructure needed to support youth power addressed two distinct issues—one around youth power within the nonprofit sector, community-based organizations, and philanthropies, and another around “real [youth] representation and engagement” in government institutions. He asked the committee to reflect on these two areas and talk about whether there is a need for further focus or clarity beyond saying “we need both.”

Yu responded by emphasizing the need for strategic investments in the pipeline as well as thinking about investment infrastructure. She added that she is funding a “strategy college for power builders” and asked, “Why can’t we do that for youth-led evaluation and research?” She continued, “We have [not] been thoughtful enough about how to bring together the best minds that would be led by young people to do that strategy making.” Zhang related a conversation that she had during lunch about how to move toward a community where although philanthropy and nonprofits exist, the community relies less on them, and young people have other forms of support, including support for transit infrastructure from government so that young people can more easily get around and to their jobs. Johnson pointed to “things that are working like HBCUs and tribal colleges and Hispanic-serving colleges” and considering whether “we should really double down on” those investments. This is “our collective responsibility,” she said, and given that “public health is about what we do collectively to create conditions for health . . . government should be playing a much broader role.”

VanLanen acknowledged this is a tough question for her, saying that she thought she could change the education system from the inside and had tried to do so previously, but that even in partnership with someone in a position of leadership as a superintendent, “it was really difficult [and] it still is.” She recognized the “great stuff happening outside of the system” discussed during the workshop and asked, “How do we elevate that? How do we not look upon that as this cute little project or this cute little model . . . and how do we truthfully invest in that to show our systems what is possible?” Terriquez added that she is interested in thinking about how best to take the work of community-based organizations and incorporate them into institutions like K–12 schools and community col-

Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×

leges, “which are important access points to many multiply marginalized young people.”

Todres said that government and other institutions, including a lot of philanthropy, operate in a “sector specific” way and do not effectively integrate comprehensive services. He said he is interested in exploring how “to create comprehensive, integrated systems that are really responsive to the interests and the needs of young people,” adding that he approaches this from a “rights perspective,” considering how to “mainstream” children’s rights and youth voice into all sectors, not only health care and education, but also transportation and other areas “where institutions often do not think about young people.”

Garcel called for “go[ing] hard and long on the grassroot infrastructure . . . because that is part of what creates the leaders that we saw today.” She also pointed to the need to focus on culture and arts institutions and organizations, which she acknowledged was not discussed during the workshop. She said that “the arts are such an important part of how young people get engaged and show their leadership and their expertise.” Garcel added that private-sector boards, including those of hospitals and colleges, need to make seats available for young people instead of “power and proceeds” being what drives how those seats are filled. She said, “it is the people who are impacted by these larger institutions that need to be heard and seen.”

Baxter said that he thought “one of the most compelling things we heard today was how often young people are at literally the bleeding edge of the unfair impacts that are happening in society and yet so often the last to be heard or to be considered or to be brought in around both understanding the problem and driving the solution.” Baxter thanked everyone for “an extraordinary day” and concluded the workshop.

Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×

This page intentionally left blank.

Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×
Page 77
Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×
Page 78
Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×
Page 79
Suggested Citation:"6 Closing Discussion." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27332.
×
Page 80
Next: Appendix A: Workshop Agenda »
Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop Get This Book
×
 Exploring the Power of Youth Leadership in Creating Conditions for Health and Equity: Proceedings of a Workshop
Buy Paperback | $20.00 Buy Ebook | $16.99
MyNAP members save 10% online.
Login or Register to save!
Download Free PDF

Young people often engage and lead efforts to improve the social, economic, and environmental factors that influence the health and equity of communities and the nation. The National Academies Roundtable on Population Health Improvement hosted a hybrid public workshop in September 2023 at The California Endowment Center for Healthy Communities in Oakland, California to discuss the power of youth leadership in creating conditions for health and equity and the civic infrastructure and resources that support youth participation and leadership in change efforts.

READ FREE ONLINE

  1. ×

    Welcome to OpenBook!

    You're looking at OpenBook, NAP.edu's online reading room since 1999. Based on feedback from you, our users, we've made some improvements that make it easier than ever to read thousands of publications on our website.

    Do you want to take a quick tour of the OpenBook's features?

    No Thanks Take a Tour »
  2. ×

    Show this book's table of contents, where you can jump to any chapter by name.

    « Back Next »
  3. ×

    ...or use these buttons to go back to the previous chapter or skip to the next one.

    « Back Next »
  4. ×

    Jump up to the previous page or down to the next one. Also, you can type in a page number and press Enter to go directly to that page in the book.

    « Back Next »
  5. ×

    Switch between the Original Pages, where you can read the report as it appeared in print, and Text Pages for the web version, where you can highlight and search the text.

    « Back Next »
  6. ×

    To search the entire text of this book, type in your search term here and press Enter.

    « Back Next »
  7. ×

    Share a link to this book page on your preferred social network or via email.

    « Back Next »
  8. ×

    View our suggested citation for this chapter.

    « Back Next »
  9. ×

    Ready to take your reading offline? Click here to buy this book in print or download it as a free PDF, if available.

    « Back Next »
Stay Connected!