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Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions (2024)

Chapter: Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
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Appendix B
Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff

COMMITTEE MEMBERS

Richard L. Corsi, Ph.D., PE (Chair), was appointed the dean of engineering of the University of California, Davis, in July 2021. He was formerly the H. Chik M. Erzurulu Dean of the Maseeh College of Engineering and Computer Science at Portland State University (PSU). Prior to joining PSU, Dr. Corsi was a faculty member, department chair, and endowed research chair at the University of Texas at Austin in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering. Dr. Corsi is an internationally recognized expert in the field of indoor air quality, with a specific interest in physical and chemical interactions between pollutants and indoor materials. He and his colleagues have published nearly 270 peer-reviewed papers stemming from 70 funded research projects and supervision of over 120 students in research. He was inducted into the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climates’ Academy of Fellows in 2008 and is a past president of that Academy. Dr. Corsi was a member of the planning committee responsible for the 2016 National Academies report Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Particulate Matter: Workshop Summary. He received his B.S. degree in environmental resources engineering from Humboldt State University, where he was honored as a Distinguished Alumnus in 2006, and his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University of California, Davis, where he was honored with a Distinguished Engineering Alumni Medal from the College of Engineering in 2016.

Lilia A. Abron, Ph.D., PE, BCEE (NAE), is the president and chief executive officer of PEER Consultants, P.C. (PEER). She was the first African American woman in the nation to earn a Ph.D. in chemical engineering. Dr. Abron has built one of the largest black, female-owned and operated environmental engineering firms in the United States. PEER provides services to clients in environmental engineering and sciences; field services; energy and environmental sustainability; and water and wastewater engineering. Her experience spans more than 45 years in planning, managing, and directing environmental engineering programs for the improvement, maintenance, and enhancement of the natural and built environments. She is also the president and founder of PEER Africa (Pty) Ltd., an innovative design-build, sustainable development company with offices in Johannesburg and Cape Town, South Africa. Dr. Abron earned her Ph.D. in chemical engineering from the University of Iowa, an M.S. in sanitary science from Washington University, and a B.S. in chemistry from Lemoyne-Owen College. She was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2020, is a board-certified environmental engineer, and was the 2021 president of the American Academy of Environmental Engineers and Scientists.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×

Seema Bhangar, Ph.D., serves as the principal of healthy buildings and communities for innovation and research at the U.S. Green Building Council. She previously held program manager and technical lead roles at the commercial real estate firm WeWork. Dr. Bhangar specializes in indoor air quality research projects with a focus on applying human-centric approaches to environmental sensing in buildings and transportation systems. Earlier in her career, she was a technical lead and product manager for the design and development of next-generation indoor sensing devices for Aclima, Inc. She is a regular peer reviewer for journals including Indoor Air, Building and Environment, and Environmental Science & Technology. Dr. Bhangar earned a B.A.S. from Stanford University and an M.S. and Ph.D. in environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Wanyu (Rengie) Chan, Ph.D., is a staff scientist and the deputy indoor environment group leader in the Energy Analysis and Environmental Impact Division at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her work focuses on characterizing indoor air quality and implications of human exposures in residential and commercial buildings. Dr. Chan led a recent field study to evaluate the role of mechanical ventilation on indoor air quality in new California homes. She is part of an ongoing project funded by Department of Energy’s Building America Program to study indoor air quality in new homes across different U.S. regions. Dr. Chan has also modeled the health benefits from filtration of ambient PM2.5 and during wildfire smoke. She joined the Lawrence Berkeley lab as a graduate student and worked on the evaluation of shelter-in-place effectiveness. Dr. Chan earned her B.S. in chemical engineering from Carnegie Mellon University and her M.S. and Ph.D. in civil and environmental engineering from the University of California, Berkeley, in 2006.

Elizabeth C. Matsui, M.D., M.H.S., is a professor of population health and pediatrics at the Dell Medical School at the University of Texas at Austin, where she is also the director of clinical and translational research. She is a leading international expert on environmental allergies and asthma. Her research focuses on examining the impact of allergen exposure on allergic disease. She serves on the editorial board of the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology and is a member of the American College of Asthma, Allergy, and Immunology and of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma, and Immunology. Dr. Matsui serves on the National Academies Standing Committee on Medical and Epidemiological Aspects of Air Pollution on U.S. Government Employees and Their Families. She received her undergraduate degree in molecular biology and her M.D. from Vanderbilt University. Dr. Matsui also completed a master of health science in epidemiology at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Linda A. McCauley, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, FAAOHN (NAM), is a professor in and the dean of Emory University’s Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing. Dean McCauley has special knowledge in the design of epidemiological investigations of environmental hazards and is nationally recognized for her expertise in occupational and environmental health nursing. Her work aims to identify culturally appropriate interventions to decrease the impact of environmental and occupational health hazards in vulnerable populations, including workers and young children. Dr. McCauley was previously the associate dean for research and the Nightingale Professor in Nursing at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing. She

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×

received a bachelor of nursing degree from the University of North Carolina, a masters in nursing from Emory, and a doctorate degree in environmental health and epidemiology from the University of Cincinnati. She was elected a member of the Institute of Medicine (now the National Academy of Medicine) in 2008 and has served on numerous National Academies committees.

Meredith C. McCormack M.D., M.H.S., is an associate professor of medicine at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine with a joint appointment in environmental health and engineering at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. Dr. McCormack is a physician–scientist with a research focus on the effect of environmental influences on underlying obstructive lung disease—specifically air pollution, diet, and obesity influences on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. She has conducted environmental cohort studies to understand the effects of indoor and outdoor air pollution on children and adults with underlying respiratory disease. She earned her M.D. from Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University and her M.H.S. from the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health.

Kimberly A. Prather, Ph.D. (NAE, NAS), holds a joint appointment as a professor in chemistry and biochemistry at Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego. Her research involves the development and application in field and lab studies of real-time measurements of size-resolved chemistry of aerosols. Dr. Prather is involved in aerosol source apportionment studies and her group is working to better understand the impact of specific aerosol sources on health and climate. She was formerly a member of the Fine Particle Monitoring Subcommittee of the Environmental Protection Agency’s Clean Air Scientific Advisory Committee. Dr. Prather is on several editorial boards for journals including Aerosol Science and Technology and is a member of a number of professional societies including the American Association for Aerosol Research, the American Chemical Society, and the American Geophysical Union. She received her B.S. and Ph.D. in chemistry from the University of California, Davis. Dr. Prather was elected a member of the National Academy of Engineering in 2019 and of the National Academy of Sciences in 2020.

Jeffrey A. Siegel, Ph.D., is a professor of civil engineering at the University of Toronto and a member of the university’s Building Engineering Research Group. He holds joint appointments at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health and the Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences. Dr. Siegel is a fellow of the American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers and a member of the Academy of Fellows of the International Society of Indoor Air Quality and Climate. His research interests including healthy and sustainable buildings, ventilation and indoor air quality in residential and commercial buildings, control of indoor particulate matter, the indoor microbiome, and moisture interactions with indoor chemistry and biology. He holds a B.Sc. from Swarthmore College and an M.S. and Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley.

Brent Stephens, Ph.D., is a professor of architectural engineering, Arthur W. Hill Endowed Chair in Sustainability, and department chair in the Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering at the Illinois Institute of Technology (IIT). He is a specialist in the fate and transport of indoor pollutants, building energy and environmental measurements and models, HVAC filtration, and human exposure assessment. Dr. Stephens co-directs the Built

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×

Environment Research Group at IIT, which consists of undergraduate students, graduate students, and postdoctoral researchers conducting research on energy efficiency and indoor air quality in buildings. His research projects have included improving and applying methods to measure the infiltration of outdoor particulate matter and reactive gases into homes; measuring gas and particle emissions and evaluating emission control devices; measuring the in-situ particle removal efficiency of HVAC filters in real environments; developing inexpensive, open-source devices for measuring and recording long-term indoor environmental and building operational data; and characterizing the energy, air quality, and health impacts of ventilation and air cleaning interventions. Dr. Stephens holds a B.S. in civil engineering from Tennessee Technological University and an M.S.E. in environmental and water resources engineering and Ph.D. in civil engineering from The University of Texas at Austin.

Marina E. Vance, Ph.D., is an associate professor and McLagan Family Faculty Fellow in the Department of Mechanical Engineering at University of Colorado Boulder, and she holds a courtesy appointment in the university’s environmental engineering program. Her research is focused on air quality, specifically on measuring emissions and understanding the dynamics of aerosols in the context of ambient and indoor air quality. She is one of the principal investigators of the HOMEChem (House Observations of Microbial and Environmental Chemistry) and CASA (Chemical Assessments of Surfaces and Air) research initiatives, which were large indoor chemistry field campaigns incorporating measurements from several research groups. Dr. Vance earned B.S. (sanitation and environmental engineering) and M.S. (environmental engineering) degrees from the Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina (Brazil) and a Ph.D. (civil and environmental engineering) from Virginia Tech.

PROJECT STAFF

David A. Butler, Ph.D., is the J. Herbert Hollomon Scholar of the National Academy of Engineering (NAE). He also serves as the director of NAE’s Cultural, Ethical, Social, and Environmental Responsibility in Engineering program. Before joining the National Academies, Dr. Butler served as an analyst for the U.S. Congress Office of Technology Assessment, was a research associate in the Department of Environmental Health of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, conducted research at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government and practiced as a product safety engineer at Xerox Corporation. He has directed numerous National Academies studies on environmental health and technology policy topics, including ones that produced the reports Climate Change, the Indoor Environment, and Health; Damp Indoor Spaces and Health; and Clearing the Air: Asthma and Indoor Air Exposures. Dr. Butler earned his B.S. and M.S. degrees in electrical engineering from the University of Rochester and his Ph.D. in public policy analysis from Carnegie Mellon University. He is a recipient of the National Academies’ Cecil Medal for Research.

Courtney Hill, Ph.D., was formerly a program officer at the National Academy of Engineering working within the Cultural, Ethical, Social, and Environmental Responsibility in Engineering Program. Prior to joining the National Academy of Engineering, Dr. Hill was a Mirzayan Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the InterAcademy Partnership where she coordinated international meetings addressing how academies across the globe could work together to support the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals. In addition, Dr. Hill has also taught

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×

English at a magnet high school in South Korea as a Fulbright Scholar. Dr. Hill earned her B.S. degree in civil engineering from the University of Arkansas and her M.E. and Ph.D. degrees in civil engineering from the University Virginia. Her doctoral research investigated the relationship between human health and access to silver-embedded ceramics as well as other mechanisms by which silver can be used to treat water in low-income areas.

Maiya Spell, B.S., was formerly a senior program assistant in the Program Office of the National Academy of Engineering. Ms. Spell graduated from the University of Maryland, College Park, in 2021, where she received a B.S. in public health science and certificate in Black women’s studies. During her undergraduate career, she worked across a variety of fields, including interning in the cardiology department at the University of Maryland Medical Center; interning at Time Organization Inc., a mental health clinic for kids and adolescents; and working in property management for Morgan Properties.

Casey Gibson, M.S. E.I.T, is an associate program officer at the National Academy of Engineering where she focuses on projects related to cultural, ethical, social, and environmental responsibility. In 2022 Ms. Gibson earned her M.S. degree in humanitarian engineering and science with a focus in environmental engineering from the Colorado School of Mines. During her master’s degree work, she developed, taught, and implemented a participatory methodology for sociotechnical analysis in engineering projects and focused her fieldwork in rural Colombian communities. She holds dual undergraduate degrees in biological/agricultural engineering and Spanish with a minor in sustainability from the University of Arkansas. Additionally, she was a Fulbright Scholar in Mexico from 2018 to 2020.

Chessie Briggs, B.A., is a senior program assistant in the Program Office of the National Academy of Engineering. Ms. Briggs graduated from the University of Redlands in 2022, where she received a B.A. in both public policy and political science. During her undergraduate career, she worked for an international nonprofit organization, traveling to China to help implement a new program in a local orphanage, and worked for the (Washington State) City of Federal Way’s Economic Development Director, assessing the city’s capabilities to host a large-scale event. Additionally, she has recently worked as a legislative intern on Capitol Hill.

Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×

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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
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Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
Page 234
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
Page 235
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
Page 236
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
Page 237
Suggested Citation:"Appendix B: Biographic Sketches of Committee Members and Project Staff." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2024. Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27341.
×
Page 238
Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions Get This Book
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 Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions
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Schools, workplaces, businesses, and even homes are places where someone could be subjected to particulate matter (PM) – a mixture of solid particles and liquid droplets found in the air. PM is a ubiquitous pollutant comprising a complex and ever-changing combination of chemicals, dust, and biologic materials such as allergens. Of special concern is fine particulate matter (PM2.5), PM with a diameter of 2.5 microns (<0.0001 inch) or smaller. Fine PM is small enough to penetrate deep into the respiratory system, and the smallest fraction of it, ultrafine particles (UFPs), or particles with diameters less than 0.1 micron, can exert neurotoxic effects on the brain. Overwhelming evidence exists that exposure to PM2.5 of outdoor origin is associated with a range of adverse health effects, including cardiovascular, pulmonary, neurological and psychiatric, and endocrine disorders as well as poor birth outcomes, with the burden of these effects falling more heavily on underserved and marginalized communities.

Health Risks of Indoor Exposure to Fine Particulate Matter and Practical Mitigation Solutions explores the state-of the-science on the health risks of exposure to fine particulate matter indoors along with engineering solutions and interventions to reduce risks of exposure to it, including practical mitigation strategies. This report offers recommendations to reduce population exposure to PM2.5, to reduce health impacts on susceptible populations including the elderly, young children, and those with pre-existing conditions, and to address important knowledge gaps.

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