National Academies Press: OpenBook

Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application (2023)

Chapter: Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports

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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 10
Page 11
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 11
Page 12
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 12
Page 13
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 13
Page 14
Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 14
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Suggested Citation:"Chapter 3 - Summary of Survey of Airports." National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine. 2023. Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application. Washington, DC: The National Academies Press. doi: 10.17226/27403.
×
Page 15

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8 The information presented in this report is based on a survey of staff at large, medium, small, and non-hub U.S. airports directly responsible for airport planning, ground transportation oper- ations, or terminal operations. Of the airports contacted, 23 responded. As shown in Table 3-1 and Figure 3-1, the responding airports included 14 large-hub, five medium-hub, three small- hub, and one non-hub airport. The participating airports reflect the range of data collection efforts at airports. Of the 23 respond- ing airports, four are operated by counties, eight are operated by cities, two are operated jointly by city and county, and nine are operated by airport or port authorities. Figure 3-2 through Figure 3-9 summarize the responses from the staff of the 23 airports that completed the survey. Appendix A: Survey Questions with Results provides full individual survey results. 3.1 Data Collection for Ground Access (Passengers Only) Figure 3-2 through Figure 3-4, followed by a written summary of responses, summarize how often the surveyed airports collected ground access data. Continuous data collection is an auto- mated system that continuously collects data without pause. Regular data collection (more than once a year or annually) refers to a scheduled data collection. Responses are indicated here, and for instances where “other” was the response, details are provided if the information was shared: • Total vehicle volume data: Seven airports collect this information continuously; two collect it more than once a year; 10 collect it as necessary; one responded “other”; three do not collect this information. • Mode-specific vehicle volume data: Twelve airports collect this information continuously; one collects it more than once a year; six collect it as necessary; three collect it under “other”; one does not collect this information. One airport indicated that these data are collected as necessary; however, the airport cannot distinguish between some modes. • Vehicle classification data: Seven airports collect this information continuously; one collects it more than once a year; two collect it annually; eight collect it as necessary; one responded “other”; four do not collect this information. One airport indicated that these data are col- lected only for parked vehicles. • Passenger mode share data: Five airports collect this information as necessary; one collects it more than once a year; one collects it annually; six collect it as necessary; three collect it under “other”; two do not know if the airport collects the data; four do not collect this information. C H A P T E R   3 Summary of Survey of Airports

Summary of Survey of Airports 9   DEN SLC Large-hub Medium-hub Small-hub Non-hub IND EUG SAV ORD SNA FLL JAC SAN MDW DFW EWR, JFK, LGA SFO PHX BOS TPA SAT CVG RNO COS Figure 3-1. Online survey respondents. Airport Name Airport Code 2019 Enplanements Hub Size Operating Jurisdiction Chicago O’Hare International Airport ORD 40,871,223 Large City Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport DFW 35,778,573 Large Authority Denver International Airport DEN 33,592,945 Large City & County John F. Kennedy International Airport JFK 31,036,655 Large Authority San Francisco International Airport SFO 27,779,230 Large City & County Newark Liberty International Airport EWR 23,160,763 Large Authority Phoenix Sky Harbor International Airport PHX 22,433,552 Large City Boston Logan International Airport BOS 20,699,377 Large Authority Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport FLL 17,950,989 Large County LaGuardia Airport LGA 15,393,601 Large Authority Salt Lake City International Airport SLC 12,840,841 Large City San Diego International Airport SAN 12,648,692 Large Authority Tampa International Airport TPA 10,978,756 Large Authority Chicago Midway International Airport MDW 10,081,781 Large City John Wayne Airport SNA 5,153,276 Medium County San Antonio International Airport SAT 5,022,980 Medium City Indianapolis International Airport IND 4,709,183 Medium Authority Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport CVG 4,413,457 Medium County Reno-Tahoe International Airport RNO 2,162,250 Medium Authority Savannah/Hilton Head International Airport SAV 1,461,360 Small City Colorado Springs Airport COS 828,429 Small City Eugene Airport EUG 596,156 Small City Jackson Hole Airport JAC 444,047 Non-hub County Source: InterVISTAS Consulting USA LLC; 2019 Enplanement data from FAA. Table 3-1. Hub size and 2019 enplaned passengers of participating airports.

10 Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application 7 12 7 12 1 2 10 6 8 1 3 1 3 1 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 Total vehicle volume data Mode-specific vehicle volume data Vehicle classification data * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-2. Frequency of collecting ground access data (1 of 3). 5 2 1 1 1 1 6 10 9 3 2 1 2 1 5 9 10 0 5 10 15 20 25 Passenger mode share data Wait times for transportation services Curbside dwell times * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-3. Frequency of collecting ground access data (2 of 3).

Summary of Survey of Airports 11   • Wait times for transportation services: One airport collects this information more than once a year; 10 collect it as necessary; two collect it under “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; nine do not collect this information. • Curbside dwell times: Two airports collect this information continuously; one collects it more than once a year; nine collect it as necessary; one responded “other”; 10 do not collect this information. • Ridership of airport-owned shuttle services: Eleven airports collect this information con- tinuously; two collect it more than once a year; two collect it annually; one collects it as neces- sary; two collect it under “other”; five do not collect this information. • Ridership of public transit services: Three airports collect this information more than once a year; three collect it as necessary; one collects it annually; five collect it as necessary; one responded “other”; 10 do not collect this information. • Staging/hold lot wait times: One airport collects this information continuously; one collects it more than once a year; two collect it annually; four collect it as necessary; two collect it under “other”; 13 do not collect this information. 3.2 Data Collection in the Terminal Before Security Figure 3-5 and Figure 3-6, followed by a written summary of responses, indicate how often the surveyed airports collected terminal data on the non-secure side of the terminal. Responses are indicated here, and for instances where “other” was the response, information is detailed if it was shared: • Queue length at ticketing: Eleven airports collect this information as necessary; one collects it annually; two collect it continuously; one responded “other”; one does not know if the air- port collects the data; seven do not collect this information. One airport indicated that data are sometimes requested from airlines. 11 3 1 2 3 1 2 1 2 1 5 4 2 1 2 5 10 13 0 5 10 15 20 25 Ridership of airport-owned shuttle services Ridership of public transit services Staging / hold lot wait times * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-4. Frequency of collecting ground access data (3 of 3).

12 Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application 9 3 3 1 1 1 5 7 5 2 3 1 1 2 5 8 12 0 5 10 15 20 25 Time in queue at security checkpoint Passenger movement (e.g., passenger counts at discrete locations and/or following certain paths) Other data (e.g., related to concessions, bag claim, restrooms, etc.) * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-6. Frequency of collecting terminal data before security (2 of 2). 2 3 12 1 1 1 1 11 9 3 1 2 1 1 7 9 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 Queue length at ticketing Time in queue at ticketing Queue length at security checkpoint * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-5. Frequency of collecting terminal data before security (1 of 2).

Summary of Survey of Airports 13   • Time in the queue at ticketing: Nine airports collect this information as necessary; one col- lects it annually; three collect it continuously; one does not know if the airport collects the data; nine do not collect this information. • Queue length at the security checkpoint: Twelve airports collect this information continu- ously; one collects it more than once a year; one collects it annually; three collect this infor- mation as necessary; two collect it under “other”; four do not collect this information. One airport indicated that these data are collected daily by TSA. • Time in the queue at the security checkpoint: Nine airports collect this information continu- ously; one collects it more than once a year; one collects it annually; five collect it as necessary; two collect it under “other”; five do not collect this information. One airport indicated that data is collected daily by TSA. • Passenger movement: Seven airports collect this information as necessary; three collect it continuously; one collects it annually; three collect it under “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; eight do not collect this information. • Other data: Five airports collect this information as necessary; one responded “other”; three collect it continuously; two do not know if the airport collects the data; 12 do not collect this information. 3.3 Data Collection in the Terminal Post Security Figure 3-7 and Figure 3-8, followed by a written summary of responses, summarize how often the surveyed airports collected terminal data on the secure side of the terminal. Responses are indicated here, and for instances where “other” was the response, information is detailed if it was shared: • Queue length at customs/immigration: Six airports collect this information as necessary; five collect it continuously; one collects it more than once a year; two do not know if the air- port collects the data; nine do not collect this information. 5 5 7 1 1 2 2 6 8 6 1 2 2 19 7 4 0 5 10 15 20 25 Queue length at customs / immigration Time in queue at customs / immigration Concession usage * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-7. Frequency of collecting terminal data after security (1 of 2).

14 Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application • Time in the queue at customs/immigration: Eight airports collect this information as neces- sary; five collect it continuously; one collects it more than once a year; two do not know if the airport collects the data; seven do not collect this information. • Concession usage: Seven airports collect this information continuously; six collect it as neces- sary; two collect it annually; two collect it more than once a year; one collects it under “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; four do not collect this information. • Passenger movement: Five airports collect this information as necessary; four collect it con- tinuously; two collect it more than once a year; and two collect it under “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; nine do not collect this information. • Passenger accumulation: Eight airports collect this information as necessary; two collect it more than once a year; one collects it continuously; two responded “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; nine do not collect this information. • Other data: Four airports collect this information as necessary; one collects it more than once a year; three collect it under “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; 14 do not collect this information. 3.4 Data Collection for Employees Figure 3-9 shows the frequency of data collection on employees. Responses are indicated here, and for instances where “other” was the response, it is detailed if the information was shared: • Mode choice: One airport collects this information more than once a year; six collect it as necessary; two collect it annually; one collects it continuously; one responded “other”; three do not know if the airport collects the data; nine do not collect this information. 4 1 2 2 1 5 8 4 2 2 3 1 1 1 9 9 14 0 5 10 15 20 25 Passenger movement (e.g., passenger counts at discrete locations and/or following certain paths) Passenger accumulation (e.g., holdrooms, restrooms) Other data (e.g., related to concessions, bag claim, restrooms, etc.) * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect Figure 3-8. Frequency of collecting terminal data after security (2 of 2).

Summary of Survey of Airports 15   • Parking/permit data: Thirteen airports collect this information continuously; four collect it more than once a year; five collect it as necessary; one does not collect this information. • Other data related to landside: Three airports collect this information as necessary; one col- lects it more than once a year; one collects it continuously; one responded “other”; one does not know if the airport collects the data; 16 do not collect this information. Figure 3-9. Frequency of collecting employee data. 1 13 1 1 4 1 2 6 5 3 1 1 3 1 9 1 16 0 5 10 15 20 25 Mode choice Parking / permit data Other data related to landside * includes airports that indicated they collect the data but did not identify collection frequency. Continuous More than once/year Annually As Necessary Other* Don’t Know Do Not Collect

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Airports collect data to help understand the customer journey from the entrance or access points of the airport to the boarding gates. Processes may change in order to improve the customer experience when the collected data are analyzed.

ACRP Synthesis 132: Airport Landside Data: Collection and Application, from TRB's Airport Cooperative Research Program, documents landside data, collection methods, analysis, and interpretation and discusses how that information affects airport decision-making.

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